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Forum topic by Waldschrat posted 02-16-2010 06:21 PM 2468 views 1 time favorited 35 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Waldschrat

505 posts in 2901 days


02-16-2010 06:21 PM

Topic tags/keywords: tool question

Hi Guys, I thought I would post an interesting question on all you wood workers out there young and old.

Do you know what these are for? I do know, but I am interested if anyone out there can identify them…

I have used them before and they are pretty cool, but nowadays, they pretty much belong to the past, unfortunatly

-- Nicholas, Cabinet/Furniture Maker, Blue Hill, Maine


35 replies so far

View BarryW's profile

BarryW

1015 posts in 3372 days


#1 posted 02-16-2010 06:28 PM

I would imagine they are for some kind of edge beading…but they are quite heavy…and it looks like they are quite old. And the heavy hitting-end almost makes me think they might be for a stone mason.

-- /\/\/\ BarryW /\/\/\ Stay so busy you don't have time to die.

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patron

13538 posts in 2807 days


#2 posted 02-16-2010 06:34 PM

wood chisels for around cement or stone ,
they can be sharpened quickly ,
in case they strike cement .

and can be pounded on with a sledge hammer ,
for fast wood removal .
saving your good chisels ,
for finer work .

they still sell them .

-- david - only thru kindness can this world be whole . If we don't succeed we run the risk of failure. Dan Quayle

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Waldschrat

505 posts in 2901 days


#3 posted 02-16-2010 06:36 PM

I hate to say it barry, but your only 1/3 correct, the heavy end is for hitting with the hammer, not for use on stone nor edge beading. Thanks for your reply though!

-- Nicholas, Cabinet/Furniture Maker, Blue Hill, Maine

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Waldschrat

505 posts in 2901 days


#4 posted 02-16-2010 07:52 PM

patron, I have never heard of using these for stone work, or around stone, Anything is possible though.

they are around 1 mm to about 3 mm thick, nothing that would handle stone or cement.

hint: they are for fine work, and only in wood!

Please keep the guesses comming!

-- Nicholas, Cabinet/Furniture Maker, Blue Hill, Maine

View webwood's profile

webwood

626 posts in 2716 days


#5 posted 02-16-2010 08:09 PM

roundover chisels

-- -erik & christy-

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Waldschrat

505 posts in 2901 days


#6 posted 02-16-2010 08:11 PM

nope :-) but try again!

-- Nicholas, Cabinet/Furniture Maker, Blue Hill, Maine

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Moron

5032 posts in 3359 days


#7 posted 02-16-2010 08:30 PM

they look similar to a chisel, refered to as a “slick” often used in timber framing and boat building

-- "Good artists borrow, great artists steal”…..Picasso

View dustbunny's profile

dustbunny

1149 posts in 2761 days


#8 posted 02-16-2010 08:30 PM

Are they for making some sort of molding by hand?

-- Imagination rules the world. ~ Napoleon Bonaparte ~ http://quiltedwood.com

View DaddyZ's profile

DaddyZ

2475 posts in 2506 days


#9 posted 02-16-2010 08:37 PM

Old Fashioned Biscuit Joiner!!! Ha I knew it! :)

Really no Clue, Dowel Groover?

-- Pat - Worker of Wood, Collector of Tools, Father of one

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Waldschrat

505 posts in 2901 days


#10 posted 02-16-2010 08:44 PM

Dustbunny, sorry no. No molding.

Roman, I must say its is not a slick either. I guess one could use one in the process of building either a house or boat, I would say one would generally find this tool in the cabinet or tool box of a finish carpenter or cabinetmaker, maybe a shipwright (not certian there). Its used for precision work because once this tool is used, its very difficult or next to impossible to correct a inacurate use.

Ok another hint… it is a special type of mortiser (this is half the riddle!) BUT FOR WHAT

-- Nicholas, Cabinet/Furniture Maker, Blue Hill, Maine

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Waldschrat

505 posts in 2901 days


#11 posted 02-16-2010 08:46 PM

DaddyZ Thats a good one! :-))

Sorry, not for dowels and not for joining wood.

-- Nicholas, Cabinet/Furniture Maker, Blue Hill, Maine

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Waldschrat

505 posts in 2901 days


#12 posted 02-16-2010 08:56 PM

DaveR, no cigar, keep thinking,

tom1, sorry but you are getting warmer…

-- Nicholas, Cabinet/Furniture Maker, Blue Hill, Maine

View dustbunny's profile

dustbunny

1149 posts in 2761 days


#13 posted 02-16-2010 09:50 PM

Removing the fur off some of Larry’s hairy oak ?

Photobucket

-- Imagination rules the world. ~ Napoleon Bonaparte ~ http://quiltedwood.com

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Waldschrat

505 posts in 2901 days


#14 posted 02-16-2010 10:04 PM

holy cow, that looks like coconut husk!

sorry but no!

-- Nicholas, Cabinet/Furniture Maker, Blue Hill, Maine

View Dennisgrosen's profile

Dennisgrosen

10850 posts in 2581 days


#15 posted 02-16-2010 10:22 PM

they are used when you have old hinges you have be installt
I can´t remmember the name right now

Dennis

showing 1 through 15 of 35 replies

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