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Resawing on table saw.

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Forum topic by 716 posted 02-17-2016 09:38 PM 950 views 0 times favorited 21 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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716

502 posts in 376 days


02-17-2016 09:38 PM

I am trying to save some wood and make a table top from 20mm plywood and gluing 5mm hard maple veneer on top.
I used up my budged for tools for some foreseeable future and I have to cope with what I have so a bandsaw is out of the question for now.
The question is: should I even attempt to resaw 7ft long 6” wide 4×4 hard maple boards into three 5mm each on 2HP Grizzly hybrid saw with thin kerf rip blade.
Or better to play on the safe side and make the whole table top from solid wood ( which will make a better table anyway).

-- It's nice!


21 replies so far

View shampeon's profile

shampeon

1711 posts in 1643 days


#1 posted 02-17-2016 10:00 PM

The first rule of veneering is to veneer both sides of the piece to prevent cupping, for the same reason that you need to apply finish to both sides of a piece.

For a table top, I don’t think I’d use veneered plywood. If I’ve learned one thing, it’s that the wood costs are (usually) dwarfed by the time and effort put into the pieces. If you’re going to spend a lot of time on something, do it right, and don’t cut corners.

I’d resaw your 4×4 maple into 3 1.2” boards (losing 0.375” from the 1/8” thin-kerf blade). That would leave you a decently thick top for final dimensioning.

-- ian | "You can't stop what's coming. It ain't all waiting on you. That's vanity."

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716

502 posts in 376 days


#2 posted 02-17-2016 10:05 PM

Sorry 4×4 really wanted to be 4/4. I would never think wasting 4”x4” maple into regular boards.
But you are right.
When one starts cut corners he’d better go and buy some ready furniture in the store. It is cheaper that way.

-- It's nice!

View AandCstyle's profile

AandCstyle

2561 posts in 1717 days


#3 posted 02-17-2016 11:21 PM

716, even if you had a band saw, you would have to be extremely lucky or extremely skillful to get 15mm of usable stock out of a 4/4 board that length. By the time you face joint and plane it, then plane again after the band saw cuts. FWIW

-- Art

View rwe2156's profile

rwe2156

2187 posts in 940 days


#4 posted 02-18-2016 12:47 PM

My question is how big is the table and how much money are you really saving?

If it were birdseye or quilted maple it would be different.

If you just want to try it yeah you should be able to resaw with a good sharp blade and steady feed.
I would definitely use an auxilary tall fence and a featherboards.
Keep in mind of you stop the cut maple will burn in a heartbeat.

Be ready for warpage and cupping, too.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

View bondogaposis's profile

bondogaposis

4020 posts in 1811 days


#5 posted 02-18-2016 01:06 PM

Make the top from solid wood, you will be much happier. Way less effort and better product.

-- Bondo Gaposis

View BinghamtonEd's profile

BinghamtonEd

2281 posts in 1829 days


#6 posted 02-18-2016 01:25 PM

I agree with Art, you’d be real lucky to get 3 boards out of your 4/4. If they’re quartersawn, stable, and your setup is dead on, maybe (just maybe).

As far as the money saved, I’ll assume you’re using a high-quality plywood, in which case, the money saved is probably negligible between plywood +maple, and just maple. If you’re not using a high quality plywood, and you get your maple applied, and the season changes, and your maple decides to cup/warp…my guess is that the first thing to fail is going to be that top layer of the plywood pulling away from the underlying layer. Also, I don’t know how wide your top is, but even at 5mm thick, across the width of the tabletop, you’re going to have movement.

Long story short, you’ll save yourself time, frustration, and future issues if you just go solid wood. And, I think you’ll feel better about the finished product.

-- - The mightiest oak in the forest is just a little nut that held its ground.

View waho6o9's profile

waho6o9

7166 posts in 2037 days


#7 posted 02-18-2016 01:44 PM

“Or better to play on the safe side and make the whole table top from solid wood ( which will make a better table anyway).”

Make the better table top 716 !

View ThomasChippendale's profile

ThomasChippendale

244 posts in 392 days


#8 posted 02-18-2016 02:59 PM

I have sucessfully performed what you are intending to do on two surfaces, respectively 21 and 15 inches wide. I used 3/4 inch maple plywood as a substrate and with a good bandsaw, sliced 1/4 + inch, 6 inch wide planks from 8/4 Padauk in one case and 8 inch wide 4/4 mahogany in the other.

I jointed the edges and laminated/edge glued it to the plywood using a combination of clamps across the surface and heavy weights pressing down. I used Ă©poxy as a glue so I had plenty of working time. Then I passed them in the planer to a final thickness of 1 inch. There is a chance for further cuping I agree but the cross members, in your case the apron, will contain the cupping until you apply finish on both side.

The main reason for this was to get the nicely figured wood to be displayed, it has held-up well.

-- PJ

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

2406 posts in 1769 days


#9 posted 02-18-2016 08:00 PM

If you don’t have the proper tools go buy veneer for some one who does. It’s a no brainier 716. There’s about a million place to buy veneer.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View rwe2156's profile

rwe2156

2187 posts in 940 days


#10 posted 02-19-2016 12:38 PM

Alaska Guy:

I’ve looked for thicker veneer for a table top not easy to find.

Do you have any sources?

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

View Ger21's profile

Ger21

1047 posts in 2591 days


#11 posted 02-19-2016 03:10 PM

As previously mentioned, you always need to veneer both sides, or it will warp badly.

Also, if gluing a thick veneer to plywood, it should be no thicker than 1/8”, or 3mm. Any thicker and you may have issues with it splitting when it wants to expand and contract.

Certainly Wood sells 1/16” veneer in a variety of species.

-- Gerry, http://www.thecncwoodworker.com/index.html http://www.jointcam.com

View BinghamtonEd's profile

BinghamtonEd

2281 posts in 1829 days


#12 posted 02-19-2016 03:52 PM

Is there a reason you need it very thick? What sort of finish are you planning on using?

-- - The mightiest oak in the forest is just a little nut that held its ground.

View Kelly's profile

Kelly

1108 posts in 2404 days


#13 posted 02-19-2016 06:06 PM

As to the arguments against using a veneer, I disagree. It doesn’t take many years of being in the wood working world before you notice an awful lot of high quality product has been made using veneers. Much of it is museum quality.

The biggest change I see in veneer use would be the thicknesses. In days of old, you could scrape and even sand many of the veneered items. Now, just looking at the stuff will blow through it. Of course, if you’re making your own, it could be up to an eight of an inch thick.

View ThomasChippendale's profile

ThomasChippendale

244 posts in 392 days


#14 posted 02-19-2016 09:10 PM

Even 1/4 inch !

-- PJ

View 716's profile

716

502 posts in 376 days


#15 posted 02-19-2016 11:19 PM

People above ( not me ) say that your piece will wrap into a tube and crack into splinters.

-- It's nice!

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