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Planing vs. Scraping vs. Sanding

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Forum topic by Thomas Keefe posted 02-16-2010 03:07 AM 5134 views 0 times favorited 14 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Thomas Keefe

131 posts in 2869 days


02-16-2010 03:07 AM

Topic tags/keywords: question cherry plane finishing sanding

I am working on a Cherry Display Case. The case is mostly done now and I am thinking about
finishing. My goal is to plane all of the surfaces with a smoothing plane and touch up with
a card scraper. I hope not to sand at all. I like the look that a plane leaves on the wood
and don’t want to mess that up with sanding. I am not opposed to doing the work. It is
purely aesthetic.

I have planed all of the surfaces. After glue up, one of the joints had some glue residue that
I tried to clean up with the scaper but I am having a lot of trouble getting into the corner
and removing all of the glue.

If I sand in a small area (2” x 2”) do you think it will be apparent after the finish is applied (Watco
Danish Oil and Polyurethane). Will it stand out from the other portions of the wood?
Or would it tend to blend in? I would appreciate hearing your thoughts on this. Thanks.

Tom


14 replies so far

View Dragonsrite's profile

Dragonsrite

136 posts in 2857 days


#1 posted 02-16-2010 03:30 AM

Can you get into the corner with a chisel?

-- Dragonsrite, Minnesota

View WayneC's profile

WayneC

12642 posts in 3557 days


#2 posted 02-16-2010 03:42 AM

Good excuse to buy a chisel plane.

-- We must guard our enthusiasm as we would our life - James Krenov

View Mogebier's profile

Mogebier

170 posts in 2493 days


#3 posted 02-16-2010 03:49 AM

I am amazed at how much a little bit of sanding stands out like a sore thumb on projects. I took off some pencil lines from some drawers I made. I was being lazy. I sanded the drawers with 60, 80, 100, 150, 200, 220, 400 then 600… because I am a complete sanding freak :) But then I put lines on it for the pulls, and the lines were a weeee bit too long. So I area sanded with 60, 150, 220, 400 and 600, skipping the ones in between. You can completely see the sanding lines. Or at least I can :)
I would go at it with a chisel.

-- You can get more with a kind word and a 2 by 4, than you can with just a kind word.

View Thomas Keefe's profile

Thomas Keefe

131 posts in 2869 days


#4 posted 02-17-2010 09:27 PM

OK. Thanks for the advice. It sounds like I should avoid sanding.

I have a Stanley 93 Rabbet Plane. If you remove the front it can
be used like a chisel plane. However, the low angle seems to
introduce tearout problems. Are there chisel planes that have a
higher bed angle? Or am I doing something wrong?

Thanks again for the help.

Tom

View WayneC's profile

WayneC

12642 posts in 3557 days


#5 posted 02-18-2010 07:26 AM

Lie-Nielson Chisel Plane

I was thinking….. This is probably considered low angle. Probably overkill.

http://www.lie-nielsen.com/catalog.php?sku=975

Check out the video at http://www.youtube.com/user/LieNielsen#p/u/17/VUUF6qRcwvo

-- We must guard our enthusiasm as we would our life - James Krenov

View Gofor's profile

Gofor

470 posts in 3247 days


#6 posted 02-20-2010 03:32 AM

I would use a chisel, with the bevel side down to give you hand clearance and more control of the amount you remove.. Follow the grain lines into the joint if it is a corner. If the joint is parallel to the grain, run the chisel into the joint at 90 degrees to get all the glue out, and then use the corner of a hand card scraper pulled along the joint to clean up any irregularities in the wood.

Go

-- Go http://ncwoodworker.net/pp/showgallery.php?cat=500&ppuser=730

View Thomas Keefe's profile

Thomas Keefe

131 posts in 2869 days


#7 posted 02-22-2010 09:38 PM

WayneC: I checked out the LieNielsen video. It was very informative. They had a lot of other interesting
videos as well.

Gofor: Thanks for the suggestions. I hadn’t really thought of using the chisel bevel down. That
does provide much better control.

Thanks again.

Tom

View hObOmOnk's profile

hObOmOnk

1381 posts in 3587 days


#8 posted 02-22-2010 09:49 PM

FWIW:

Planes, chisels and card scrappers are cutting tools.

Sandpaper works by scratching.

Under low-power magnification, you can see the difference.

-- 温故知新

View Walnut_Weasel's profile

Walnut_Weasel

360 posts in 2682 days


#9 posted 02-22-2010 10:31 PM

It sounds like a chisel may be your best bet.

Per the earlier comments about planes: The effective cutting angle on any bevel up plane (I think your rabbet plane is?) can be increased/decreased by changing the angle of the iron’s micro bevel. Example – if the bed angle is 12 degrees and you put on a 35 degree micro bevel you get 47 degrees – or similar to a standard bevel down plane. Or put on a 40 degree micro bevel and you get a 52 degree cut which should help you plane some pretty gnarly stuff. If you have not established a very large micro bevel it would not take very long to sharpen a different angle and may not be all that bad of an option.

Also I found this blog post by the Village Carpenter discussing making “tiny scrapers” to clean up hard to reach areas. I have not tried it myself yet but as with a lot of things…”one of these days!” They sure would be handy for removing glue from the inside of small boxes, etc.

-- James - www.walnutweasel.wordpress.com

View CharlesNeil's profile

CharlesNeil

1610 posts in 3330 days


#10 posted 02-22-2010 11:21 PM

Thomas, warm the glue with a hair dryer , just warm, it will peel off alot easier and if you can use a razor blade like a small scraper , works well, just be careful

View Thomas Keefe's profile

Thomas Keefe

131 posts in 2869 days


#11 posted 02-23-2010 02:40 AM

Thanks for the advice. I will give that a try.

Tom

View williams's profile

williams

53 posts in 2477 days


#12 posted 02-23-2010 03:57 AM

If you use a card scraper after sanding, would it not remove all the “sanding” marks and leave same finish as if you used a plane instead of the sandpaper?

-- William, Brighton, MI

View Thomas Keefe's profile

Thomas Keefe

131 posts in 2869 days


#13 posted 02-25-2010 08:46 PM

Yes, that is true. But the reason for not planing/scraping is the difficulty of getting the
plane or scraper into the tight space. I have learned some ways of sanding in tight
corners. However, I am still learning how to plane and scrape in tight quarters.

Tom

View williams's profile

williams

53 posts in 2477 days


#14 posted 02-26-2010 03:50 AM

Could you burnish a card (or chisel) edge to deeper angle to allow you hold it flatter and closer to a corner?

-- William, Brighton, MI

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