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Tack cloth

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Forum topic by SuperDave02 posted 02-16-2010 12:17 AM 2754 views 0 times favorited 13 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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SuperDave02

138 posts in 2696 days


02-16-2010 12:17 AM

I have a ton of cheeese cloth. What can I put on it to make it into tack cloth?

-- David South FLorida http://rockingrrustics.blogspot.com/


13 replies so far

View NBeener's profile

NBeener

4808 posts in 2639 days


#1 posted 02-16-2010 12:36 AM

I give you the benefit of my wisdom (truthfully, my ability to copy and paste….):

A tack cloth is one of the best ways to remove dust and grit before applying a finish, to make one soak a cheese cloth in water, wring out the water, soak it in turpentine, wring it out again, drip enough clear varnish on the cheesecloth to make it evenly gummy throughout. Store it in a jar with a lid to keep it from drying out.

EDIT: or … this link has good info:

http://www.thesuperhandyman.com/tackrag.html

-- -- Neil

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SuperDave02

138 posts in 2696 days


#2 posted 02-16-2010 01:06 AM

That sounds easy enough. I was thinking it would be something that had to be used right away, being able to store and use it when needed is gonna be a big plus. Thanks Beener. Does Lowes or h-depot sell turpintine?

-- David South FLorida http://rockingrrustics.blogspot.com/

View hObOmOnk's profile

hObOmOnk

1381 posts in 3593 days


#3 posted 02-16-2010 01:11 AM

David:

I’ve done professional finishing for about forty years.

A tack cloth can cause more problems than it fixes because you might be moving debris around or leaving streaks of sticky residue.

Use nothing but solvent, e.g. mineral spirits or turp, on a fresh and very clean cloth.
Never reuse the wiping cloth.

-- 温故知新

View SBOhio's profile

SBOhio

24 posts in 2527 days


#4 posted 02-16-2010 03:39 AM

drgoodwood, What about paint thinner, could you comment on its use as tack cloth solvent. The can says “made from mineral spirits.

View Mogebier's profile

Mogebier

170 posts in 2498 days


#5 posted 02-16-2010 03:42 AM

I just buy a new tack cloth for big projects, and use a clean cloth with mineral spirits for little ones.

-- You can get more with a kind word and a 2 by 4, than you can with just a kind word.

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hObOmOnk

1381 posts in 3593 days


#6 posted 02-16-2010 03:51 AM

SBOhio:
The term paint thinner is generic. Generally, it is mineral spirits and/or other petroleum distillates. Read the label.

A cloth dampened with water can also be used as a tack cloth. As long as you let the wood completely dry before applying a solvent and/or oil based finish. A waterborne finish can be applied before the surface is completely dry.

Note: Water on a raw wood surface may raise the grain and that’s a good thing to do before final sanding.

-- 温故知新

View Rick  Dennington's profile

Rick Dennington

5181 posts in 2660 days


#7 posted 02-16-2010 04:40 AM

Throw the tack cloths out the door, and use a rag dipped in mineral spirits…. not too wet….not too dry. It’ll take care of any problems you find with dust….... ‘nuff said…......

-- At my age, an "all--nighter" is not having to get up and pee...!!!

View Chris Wright's profile

Chris Wright

540 posts in 2946 days


#8 posted 02-16-2010 05:00 AM

I use compressed air to clean my pieces off before I apply a finish. If there’s any stubborn dust then I wipe it off with a rag.

-- "At its best, life is completely unpredictable." - Christopher Walken

View SBOhio's profile

SBOhio

24 posts in 2527 days


#9 posted 02-16-2010 02:44 PM

Why is raising the grain a good thing? I am finishing a workbench and did wipe it down with one of the “Green” white colored solvents. (Trying to keep the vapors down in the winter shop.) I thought it was a bad thing when the grain raised and was unbelievably ruff. I sanded again and wiped down with mineral spirits before the first coat. If you just wipe with mineral spirits aren’t you then skipping the grain raising?

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Rick Dennington

5181 posts in 2660 days


#10 posted 02-16-2010 08:06 PM

Why would you want to raise the grain on a workbench anyway? I don’t think SBOhio is talking about a fine piece of furniture, unless I missed something.

-- At my age, an "all--nighter" is not having to get up and pee...!!!

View TheDane's profile

TheDane

4997 posts in 3128 days


#11 posted 02-16-2010 11:00 PM

As I understand it, raising the grain a bit allows the first coat of finish to penetrate better. When the first coat is dry, hit with some 220-grit or finer and give it a light sanding.

I don’t use tack cloths very often, but when I do, I used the pre-packaged throwaways from Rockler.

-- Gerry -- "I don't plan to ever really grow up ... I'm just going to learn how to act in public!"

View SBOhio's profile

SBOhio

24 posts in 2527 days


#12 posted 02-17-2010 12:55 AM

That’s what I was asking just in an effort to better understand the finishing process. Even though in my case it is just a work bench. Would those with more experience intentionally do a tack wipe that would raise the grain on a fine piece as part of a normal process to improve penetration?

View SBOhio's profile

SBOhio

24 posts in 2527 days


#13 posted 02-17-2010 04:10 AM

For any finnish. I was wondering if anyone intentionally does this. The water based solvent I used on a white oak work bench raised it alot more than just a little bit. It left the surface very ruff.

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