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Forum topic by cootcraig posted 02-16-2016 08:29 PM 674 views 0 times favorited 14 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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cootcraig

58 posts in 675 days


02-16-2016 08:29 PM

The Rockwell Delta 990 I asked about was gone before I got there.
Today on CL I see a mid 70’s Sears/Craftsman 10” RAS that looks like this:

http://vintagemachinery.org/photoindex/detail.aspx?id=13682

There is also a 9” possibly early 60’s RAS that looks like this

http://vintagemachinery.org/photoindex/detail.aspx?id=3065

I can be patient on looking for a RAS, how would you compare
these 2 saws? Which would you rather use?


14 replies so far

View Adam's profile

Adam

37 posts in 1692 days


#1 posted 02-16-2016 08:45 PM

If you’re willing to be patient, keep an eye out for one of the 50s Dewalts: http://vintagemachinery.org/photoindex/detail.aspx?id=11989

I picked one up for $110 off CL a year ago and spent a little time cleaning it up, and I like it a lot. Very solid and heavy (cast iron). You just have to make sure the ways are in good shape.

I understand the powershops aren’t too bad either: http://vintagemachinery.org/photoindex/detail.aspx?id=11730

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Cooler

272 posts in 307 days


#2 posted 02-16-2016 08:59 PM

I bought my neighbor’s Craftsman RAS for $100.00. It needed a new battery for the digital read out (angles).

I find it very handy for wide cutoffs, and for dados on boards for bookcases.

Make sure that the blade you use has a negative hook angle. Make sure that the carriage it adjusted so that it is fairly tight. If you can feel up and down play it is too loose.

Remember that a RAS has the potential to be more dangerous than a table saw.

And check to see if the blade guard is on the recall list. Mine was and they sent me (free) a new blade guard and a new table top. The original blade guard would not accommodate any dado heads.

-- This post is a hand-crafted natural product. Slight variations in spelling and grammar should not be viewed as flaws or defects, but rather as an integral characteristic of the creative process.

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shastaman

30 posts in 313 days


#3 posted 02-16-2016 09:03 PM

Where are you located? I have a Dewalt like Adam attached that needs a home. it came with a unisaw I bought and really dont need the project, it is original condition and needs at the very least new electric cords.
I’m in Santa Ynez, Ca.

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

3940 posts in 1957 days


#4 posted 02-16-2016 09:04 PM

King Seeley made some good stuff, but I am completely unfamiliar with their RAS. So I would probably avoid it, and wouldn’t even consider the Craftsman. The thing about the Craftsman saws is that some folks get acceptable performance out of certain models, but many don’t…why take a chance. Look for a good Dewalt, or the Delta/Rockwell turret arm (any) saws. For the Dewalts what is generally considered best are the ones with solid cast iron arms. The older round arm models would include GWI, MBF, 1030, and several others. There were some made with square arms that are also very good..like the 1030K, the 925, 1200, 1400, and some others. Usually (not always) the solid cast iron arms can be identified by the column height adjustment being right at the top of the column. Any of these saws can be tuned to be dead nuts accurate and repeatable (they don’t loose zero when you move the arm around). Narrow your search to those, and if you find a specific model (not listed above) that’s of interest check back with with the details and maybe we can help.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

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cootcraig

58 posts in 675 days


#5 posted 02-16-2016 09:45 PM



Where are you located? I have a Dewalt like Adam attached that needs a home. it came with a unisaw I bought and really dont need the project, it is original condition and needs at the very least new electric cords.
I m in Santa Ynez, Ca.

- shastaman


I’m in SE Colorado, so I’m not close.

View Adam's profile

Adam

37 posts in 1692 days


#6 posted 02-17-2016 12:03 AM

Here’s a 12” Powershop in Denver, not sure what your budget is: https://denver.craigslist.org/tls/5441147842.html

I will say, check this out first, they have a lot of information on what to look for when buying a saw: http://people.delphiforums.com/snotzalot/sawdust/

View JBrow's profile

JBrow

818 posts in 384 days


#7 posted 02-17-2016 01:16 AM

cootcraig,

I would rather use the Craftsman 10” Radial Arm Saw because of the blade size and ease of finding blades for the saw. The blade guard on the 9” model would probably prevent mounting a 10” blade, but that is a guess since I have no experience or knowledge of the 9” Craftsman model.

Indeed the Craftsman Radial Arm Saw is an inexpensive saw, comparatively speaking, and thus is probably inferior to the $3000 – $4000 radial arm saws. However my first woodworking tool was the Craftsman 10” saw, I bought used in 1986. It was used by an aluminum siding contractor to cut siding, and it looked like it was used pretty hard. I used it for cutting wood only and the motor died a couple months ago – probably the capacitor. I researched new saws and elected to replace it with a new Craftsman; because it was affordable and its predecessor served my hobbyists needs very well. I briefly thought about a sliding compound mitre saw, but did not want to rebuild the cross cut station in my shop. Also, I have not seen a sliding compound saw outfitted with a dado set and worried that I could not cut dados.

In my shop, once it was dialed in, the Craftsman Radial Arm Saw made thousands of crosscuts with a Forest Combination blade; all very accurate. However, I kept the saw set to cut at 90 deg. I positioned the workpiece to make miter cuts and bevel cuts were made on the table saw. I just did not want to spend the time to dial the saw back into the 90 deg. position, after setting it to make a bevel or mitre cut.

My recommendation would be to find a newest saw still in production if buying used, and go with a 10” or 12” saw. Doing so would make it easier to find parts should the need arise and blades are widely available. Also ensure the saw you buy comes with its manual. There are a number of critical adjustments that are required to get the most out any radial arm saw you buy. The manual will help in making the adjustments and in maintaining the saw.

A quick look at Craig’s List in Southwest Ohio revealed a number of Radial Arm Saws, mostly Craftsman, but others too. The 10” Craftsman saws were mostly in the $200 price range.

Good luck in your search!

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cootcraig

58 posts in 675 days


#8 posted 02-17-2016 06:01 PM



Here s a 12” Powershop in Denver, not sure what your budget is: https://denver.craigslist.org/tls/5441147842.html

I will say, check this out first, they have a lot of information on what to look for when buying a saw: http://people.delphiforums.com/snotzalot/sawdust/

- Adam

The powershop is above my current budget. That forum looks good, thanks for that.

View JAAune's profile

JAAune

1643 posts in 1781 days


#9 posted 02-17-2016 06:13 PM

See if you can find an OMGA at an auction. They look very well-made and seem to sell much lower used than new. I’m pretty sure I’ve seen them go for less than $500. Downside is most are 3-phase.

-- See my work at http://remmertstudios.com and http://altaredesign.com

View cootcraig's profile

cootcraig

58 posts in 675 days


#10 posted 02-18-2016 04:47 PM

Today’s CL RAS appears to be a 3-phase motor Rockwell 33-892 that looks like this

Asking $150. This looks good, if I’m willing to pull the trigger right now.

View cootcraig's profile

cootcraig

58 posts in 675 days


#11 posted 02-18-2016 04:52 PM



See if you can find an OMGA at an auction. They look very well-made and seem to sell much lower used than new. I m pretty sure I ve seen them go for less than $500. Downside is most are 3-phase.

- JAAune

Thanks, those look good indeed. I’m working on finding a shop space with 3-phase power. I may have to get a less expensive single phase RAS in the meantime.

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

3940 posts in 1957 days


#12 posted 02-18-2016 05:51 PM

Have you considered using a VFD or maybe an RPC to run 3 phase tools?

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View JAAune's profile

JAAune

1643 posts in 1781 days


#13 posted 02-19-2016 02:03 AM


See if you can find an OMGA at an auction. They look very well-made and seem to sell much lower used than new. I m pretty sure I ve seen them go for less than $500. Downside is most are 3-phase.

- JAAune

Thanks, those look good indeed. I m working on finding a shop space with 3-phase power. I may have to get a less expensive single phase RAS in the meantime.

- cootcraig

The 3-phase OMGA saws actually are cheap because they are 3-phase. Hobbyists with money run up the price of quality single phase tools. There’s a surplus of good 3-phase equipment though so you can definitely get deals once you’ve got the power supply.

So yes, if you want an affordable single-phase saw to tide you over, it’s not going to be nearly as nice as a similarly-priced 3-phase machine.

-- See my work at http://remmertstudios.com and http://altaredesign.com

View Redoak49's profile

Redoak49

1951 posts in 1453 days


#14 posted 02-19-2016 12:14 PM

Interesting and timely thread for me. I can get a DeWalt Powershop 925 for free and debating if in have room in my shop. It is a very solid machine made around 1960.

For me, it is a question of space and how it would be used. I do have a nice miter saw and a cabinet saw.

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