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Trimming veneer "slabs" prior to bent lamination?

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Forum topic by ncnickels posted 02-16-2016 02:48 PM 391 views 0 times favorited 5 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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ncnickels

5 posts in 698 days


02-16-2016 02:48 PM

Hi all,

I’ve searched around but haven’t had luck finding an answer to my question so I’ll pose it here:

I’m getting started on a small round (20”) side table that will have a curved apron and drawer. I’m going to try my hand at bent lamination using 1/32” veneer. I got some beautiful walnut from my local supplier and it’s on average about 10” wide, not trimmed to width “live edge” veneer cuts. It seems to me that it would make sense to trim one edge to get a straight line and then cut it a bit wider than I need for final dimensions and finishing after glue-up…but never having done this before, that’s where you come in. Does my plan sound reasonable, or should I try a different approach? And, if I trim first, what are your recommendations for making the cuts?

Thanks,
Neale


5 replies so far

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

3947 posts in 1959 days


#1 posted 02-16-2016 02:57 PM

I would probably do it the way you described is i was using commercial veneer. The easiest way to cut would probably be with a veneer saw. You would take a straight edge (like a piece of MDF) hold it firmly on the veneer, and follow the edge with the saw (read more here). There’s probably a dozen other ways to do it, but this one works well and you don’t have to worry about the saw following the grain, like a utility knife might do. You didn’t ask about a form, the glue or anything else so I’ll assume you have a plan.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

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ncnickels

5 posts in 698 days


#2 posted 02-16-2016 03:02 PM

Thanks Fred, and you’re right – I have an idea of where to go from there after reading posts on this and other forums. Good thing is I have enough veneer to make a mistake or two, which I fully expect to do for my first try.

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shipwright

7174 posts in 2264 days


#3 posted 02-17-2016 01:38 AM

Are you actually making the aprons and drawer front from 1/32” veneer? I would think you could use thicker stock an less laminations but if you have lots of veneer and a plan, go for it. I would recommend hide glue because it dries crystal hard and there won’t be any spring back. (among all the other reasons for using it)
As for cutting veneer, here’s A quick little video of how I do it. https://youtu.be/fYeeP_cC7Z0
I highly recommend the Gramercy tools veneer saw.

-- Paul M ..............If God wanted us to have fiberglass boats he would have given us fibreglass trees. http://thecanadianschooloffrenchmarquetry.com/

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ncnickels

5 posts in 698 days


#4 posted 02-17-2016 01:51 AM

I went with 1/32” layers because it’s a pretty tight radius at a bit less than 9”. I thought about 1/16” initially but after handling some I thought the spring would put unnecessary stress on the assembly. Do you think it would be safe to go thicker? I’ll still probably use the 1/32” and just muscle through the layers. I was leaning towards hide glue, which I love. I’ve drooled over the gramercy saw. Any issues using a band saw or a table saw simply to get a straight edge?

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shipwright

7174 posts in 2264 days


#5 posted 02-17-2016 04:10 AM

You can sandwich several layers of veneer between something like 1/4” MDF or plywood and cut them on the table saw easily, especially with a sled. Bandsaw would work too. I do this all the time when making up veneer packets for marquetry.

-- Paul M ..............If God wanted us to have fiberglass boats he would have given us fibreglass trees. http://thecanadianschooloffrenchmarquetry.com/

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