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Salvaged Wood Species I.D.

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Forum topic by tyler posted 02-16-2016 06:40 AM 882 views 0 times favorited 21 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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tyler

44 posts in 636 days


02-16-2016 06:40 AM

I just received a good amount of salvaged wood from a buddy that I think was from a very large chicken coop (that’s what I was told). He dropped off 10 boards all a little over 1” thick, 8”-9” wide and four are around 4’ long and the rest are around 7’-8’ long. He still has 7 more of the longer boards. All of the boards are straight from the saw mill with one face being painted brown. They came from Downsville, NY which is in the the south eastern part of NY not to far from the PA border. I have taken one face and one edge down to smooth with my #8 and cleaned up the end grain. All of the pictures are from the same board. If anymore pictures or information is needed to help determine the species just let me know.

Tyler


21 replies so far

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jerryminer

528 posts in 909 days


#1 posted 02-16-2016 08:01 AM

Looks like some sort of pine to me, but hard to tell much from those pics. Does it smell like pine ?(or is the pine smell overpowered by the chicken poop smell?)

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DirtyMike

466 posts in 370 days


#2 posted 02-16-2016 08:22 AM

I have yet to get one of these right, can anyone second my guess of Hickory?

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Tennessee

2410 posts in 1982 days


#3 posted 02-16-2016 12:20 PM

My initial guess was going to be ash or hickory, maybe some old growth poplar.
Growth rings are pretty wide, indicating a rather fast growing tree. That is why I added poplar, along with the bit of yellowish green showing on one end grain.

-- Paul, Tennessee, http://www.tsunamiguitars.com

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BobAnderton

219 posts in 2258 days


#4 posted 02-16-2016 04:44 PM

Looks like pine to me.

-- Bob Anderton - Austin, TX - Nova 3000 lathe, Alaskan Mark III mill, Husqavarna Saw

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LiveEdge

486 posts in 1088 days


#5 posted 02-16-2016 05:05 PM

I’m pretty suspicious of Red Alder. 1) It’s cheap (good for building a coop out of). 2) It grows fast (hence the large rings) 3) The linear lines seen in picture three are common to alder. 4) The knot, to me, looks more like alder than pine (that’s subjective). 5) I think what’s throwing everybody is the discoloration in picture 4. I don’t think that’s the wood. I think it’s the coop.

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boisdearc

44 posts in 803 days


#6 posted 02-16-2016 05:11 PM

I would say yellow pine…. We have a lot of it here in eastern okla…

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tyler

44 posts in 636 days


#7 posted 02-16-2016 07:13 PM

The face of the board shown was the rough unpainted side which I imagine was the inside. From what little I know about identifying wood the blue streaks on the right are from some sort of fungus? No matter how much I planed the darker portions of the board wouldn’t go away (last picture, the square shape at the top and also the bottom of the face pictures). I agree with LiveEdge that I think it is discoloration. I’ve been sick so smell isn’t possible at the moment either. Thanks for the replies everyone.

Tyler

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BinghamtonEd

2281 posts in 1837 days


#8 posted 02-16-2016 08:58 PM

I’d throw in a vote for red alder as well. It looks similar to the few pieces I’ve worked with. I refinished a bookcase my wife’s grandfather built in northwestern PA when he was young, probably in the 40’s. In response to the bookcase being made of red alder, he stated “Because that’s what was cheap and readily available, so that’s what we used.”

-- - The mightiest oak in the forest is just a little nut that held its ground.

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01ntrain

146 posts in 538 days


#9 posted 02-16-2016 10:25 PM

I would guess it to possibly be Soft-Maple….

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LiveEdge

486 posts in 1088 days


#10 posted 02-16-2016 10:31 PM

Can someone confirm that pine has those linear rays (don’t know if they are actual rays)? This picture demonstrates what I see in picture #3 and also demonstrates what an alder knot looks like. Pine knots, to me, are frequently cut at an oblique angle which makes them oval in shape.

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Dusty56

11806 posts in 3156 days


#11 posted 02-16-2016 10:50 PM

My first guess was Pine but then I believe that I’m seeing fine streaks , possibly pores, running with the grain in a couple of the photos. How heavy is the wood?

-- I'm absolutely positive that I couldn't be more uncertain!

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tyler

44 posts in 636 days


#12 posted 02-17-2016 12:01 AM

The wood is quite light. I do not know how old the wood is. I think it’s to light to be any maple. It’s lighter then home center eastern white pine I bought about a month ago (1×12x10). In the 3rd picture, the edge, the streaks shown run down both edges. My first guess was pine also but I’ve never worked with salvage wood and only work with walnut, EWP, oak and some maple. The species isn’t any make or break thing. Just my curiosity since I have so much.

Tyler

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LiveEdge

486 posts in 1088 days


#13 posted 02-17-2016 03:59 AM

Can you scratch it with your fingernail? The pine in my garage can be scratched. The alder cannot. Maple could not either.

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BinghamtonEd

2281 posts in 1837 days


#14 posted 02-17-2016 02:52 PM

The alder that I’ve worked with can definitely be scratched. Not as easily as pine, but much easier than maple.

-- - The mightiest oak in the forest is just a little nut that held its ground.

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LiveEdge

486 posts in 1088 days


#15 posted 02-17-2016 05:19 PM



The alder that I ve worked with can definitely be scratched. Not as easily as pine, but much easier than maple.

- BinghamtonEd

Maybe I grabbed a particularly hard piece. It was 8/4 and 8+ inches wide. Such a big tree may be older and tighter in the rings. Plus I live in Red Alder country (Oregon) where it’s considered a weed. Perhaps that means they are selecting a higher grade. Who knows? I could dent the pine pretty easily, but couldn’t get a scratch going on that piece.

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