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Forum topic by willhime posted 02-11-2016 09:16 PM 758 views 0 times favorited 9 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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willhime

83 posts in 1007 days


02-11-2016 09:16 PM

Topic tags/keywords: resource question trick tip cedar

being my first siding project, there was a couple hickups. This one in particular has me stale mated. Not realizing how the siding would line up to the edge corners, I’m looking around for advice or ideas on how to cover up my shame gaps..

I thought about running a piece parallel wide enough to cover all of them but it’s pretty ugly. The opening is the entrance door to my chicken coop I’ve been building. All to be painted white when finished.

-- Burn your fire for no witness


9 replies so far

View JoeinGa's profile

JoeinGa

7489 posts in 1475 days


#1 posted 02-12-2016 01:57 AM

Looks like you have 2 choices …
1. Cut all new pieces so they’re the correct length.
2. Cover the ugly gap with a piece of trim.

Considering the chickens wont really care how it looks, I’d go with option #2 :-)

-- Perform A Random Act Of Kindness Today ... Pay It Forward

View conifur's profile

conifur

955 posts in 619 days


#2 posted 02-12-2016 02:09 AM

Measure twice, cut once!!!!!!!!!!!!!

-- Knowledge and experience equals Wisdom, Michael Frankowski

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JBrow

822 posts in 388 days


#3 posted 02-12-2016 03:09 AM

willhime,

My understanding of the problem is that the corner where two walls meet has an ugly gap that needs to look better. If my understanding is correct and if you have the tools, the applying corner trim boards on top of the existing corner boards could look pretty good. By making the applied corner trim narrower than the existing corner boards and maybe adding a milling detail would add depth and interest to the corner.

First rip a piece of siding to a width that is about half the width of the existing corner boards. Both edges should be square edges, with the half laps removed. Then rip a second piece of siding like the first, except its width is reduced by the thickness of the siding. For example, if the revealed face of the siding is 5-1/2”, the first piece would be about 2-3/4” wide and the second ripped piece would be 2” wide with both edges of both pieces square.

Then mill a profile on one edge of each piece just ripped, leaving the other edge square. The milled edge could end up with a cove or a chamfer. However, ripped pieces could remain un-milled.

Install the narrowest ripped piece at the corner on the first wall, making its un-milled edge flush with the surface of the second wall. The milled edge is away from the corner. The widest piece is installed on the second wall completely covering the edge of the narrowest piece previously installed and made flush with the surface of the first piece of corner trim, again with the milled edge away from the corner.

When done, the corner would have a clean straight edge at the corner and the apparent width of the corner trim on both walls would be the same. The milled edges would bleed into the existing corner boards. The corner would have a bit more massive appearance and the three dimensional affect would add texture and architectural interest.

Alternatively, when the second ripped piece is installed, hold it back from the corner of the first installed piece by ¼” – 3/8”, creating a very small inside corner at the corner of the building. If this option is selected, both ripped corner trim boards should be the same width; but narrower than the existing corner boards.

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willhime

83 posts in 1007 days


#4 posted 02-12-2016 03:44 AM

wow. I’m on my 4th read through and kind of starting to get a handle on your advice.

-- Burn your fire for no witness

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JBrow

822 posts in 388 days


#5 posted 02-12-2016 05:03 AM

willhime,

I am not sure whose post you re-read 4 times. If it was mine, I thought I would add a sketch to hopefully further clarify (I hope you see it well enough) – a picture = 1000 words:


Flushed Corner Corner Trim


Inside Corner Corner Trim

View woodbutcherbynight's profile

woodbutcherbynight

2465 posts in 1877 days


#6 posted 02-13-2016 04:40 AM



Looks like you have 2 choices …
1. Cut all new pieces so they re the correct length.
2. Cover the ugly gap with a piece of trim.

Considering the chickens wont really care how it looks, I d go with option #2 :-)

- JoeinGa

Option #2 cause the chickens are not going to post about it on Facebook. ROFL

-- Live to tell the stories, they sound better that way.

View dhazelton's profile

dhazelton

2326 posts in 1764 days


#7 posted 02-13-2016 02:23 PM

Why don’t you take the corner boards off and put wider ones on? Mark the siding where the corner board overlaps it and run your trim saw on that line, remove the pieces and put the wider corner boards on.

And that’s not ship lap siding if it doesn’t overlay itself to shed water.

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willhime

83 posts in 1007 days


#8 posted 02-14-2016 09:15 AM

Your suggestion worked perfectly JBrow. Thanks for goin the extra mile with the sketch-up. Definitely settled better with the lady of the house now.

and to dhazelton- I guess it might be hard to see in the photos, but they are all dado’d boards that overlap each other by 1/2” with 2mm spacing. Please; these are respectable chickens that deserve nothing less, and you can taste their pride in every bite of waffles their precious diva eggs make a reality. lol.

-- Burn your fire for no witness

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JBrow

822 posts in 388 days


#9 posted 02-16-2016 02:29 AM

willhime,

I am glad it worked out. I had a suspicion that the corner fix was for the wife and not the chickens; even though happy chickens do make for tasty eggs.

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