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Forum topic by Marc5 posted 02-12-2010 04:06 AM 1814 views 0 times favorited 6 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Marc5

304 posts in 2802 days


02-12-2010 04:06 AM

I have some Ash that I have planed down with my hand planes. I have it very close to the finished thickness and have 3 areas where I can’t seam to prevent the tear out. I have reversed direction attempting to resolve the issue but the tear out is only moved further down the board. I realize scrapers are an option but I don’t think the digits could handle it these days. I have read that using high angle frogs help but in looking the LN site there is 2 of them; one 50 degrees and the other @ 55. I only want to by one of these and I am looking for a littel advise on which to buy. I am hoping the 50 degree is the one in order to keep the workout down a bit.

Any suggestions or comments will be greatly appreciated.

-- Marc


6 replies so far

View bigike's profile

bigike

4049 posts in 2749 days


#1 posted 02-12-2010 04:16 AM

what about using a #80 cabinet scraper or a scraper plane like a #112? i would go the 50 deg. way if i were buying a new frog. You can also regrind the blade/blades in your plane to give this angle but the math i don’t know, sorry. Also u can try to wax the plane sole with parrafin wax and this makes it easy to push across the wood.

-- Ike, Big Daddies Woodshop, http://www.icombadaniels@yahoo.com

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WayneC

12642 posts in 3558 days


#2 posted 02-12-2010 04:16 AM

Check out this article by Chris Schwartz. He contrasts the two…..

http://www.popularwoodworking.com/article/Endurance_Test3/?print=1

-- We must guard our enthusiasm as we would our life - James Krenov

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Marc5

304 posts in 2802 days


#3 posted 02-12-2010 12:52 PM

The Schwartz article was helpful. I am going to see if I can pick up a 80 scraper on ebay and give it a shot before purchasing a high angle frog. Thanks for your response, it is very helpful.

-- Marc

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WayneC

12642 posts in 3558 days


#4 posted 02-13-2010 06:35 AM

You might also look for a Stanley 112. There was quite a bit of discussion on scraper planes a bit back…

http://lumberjocks.com/projects/24141
http://lumberjocks.com/topics/12052

-- We must guard our enthusiasm as we would our life - James Krenov

View MattH's profile

MattH

27 posts in 3098 days


#5 posted 02-13-2010 07:05 AM

You might also simply try a hand scraper, the plain piece of sharp metal – get it good and sharp, with a strong burr, and then use it. if you have gloves with grippy fingers, it’ll work better and your fingers won’t get burnt from the heat it generates. Your hands will get stronger and the work will be BEAUTIFUL. It’s not at all hard to learn and it leaves a wonderful surface.

-- Death before dishonour; nothing before coffee

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Marc5

304 posts in 2802 days


#6 posted 02-16-2010 03:05 AM

I found a #80 and it is doing the job. I honed the blade with a 4000 grit stone foregoing the 8000 girt and was getting very fine shavings. I am guessing using the 8000 grit stone may help but not sure. Nevertheless the damage is gone and honestly looks pretty good. This is my first time using a scraper plane and was wondering if there is any benefit to striking a burr on the blade?

-- Marc

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