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Forum topic by Jason Sorensen posted 02-11-2016 02:51 AM 374 views 0 times favorited 8 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Jason Sorensen

3 posts in 300 days


02-11-2016 02:51 AM

Topic tags/keywords: table router custom jigs

Hello Everyone.

I have started a custom made table with the top being made out of an old Cable Spool end and fire sprinkler pipe. As you can see in the images, the black dirty edges is what the entire table looked like. I have cleaned up the top and bottom, and now i would like to use a router to clean up the edge and remove a 1/4” – 1/2” of material. The Edge has some flat spots, so i think a jig would be good to hold the router and make a perfect (or close to) circular shape and flat edges.

The problem i am encountering is the depth of the table. It is 3-1/8” thick. So, i will need a little over 1.5” deep router bit, do they exist?

Also, there is a large hole in the center (I will eventually be making bigger for a fire bowl) that prevents me from making a jig arm that would attach at the very center and the router to create the circular shape. . Does anyone have any suggestions on how I can accomplish this? I am limited to hand tools and some small power tools as I am just started with my woodworking projects.

Thank you in advance for any suggestions!


8 replies so far

View firefighterontheside's profile

firefighterontheside

13479 posts in 1320 days


#1 posted 02-11-2016 02:56 AM

You may be able to use a pattern bit from the top and get halfway thru and then do the same thing again from the other side by flipping the top over. The trick will be lining the pattern up on the bottom just as you did in the top. That center hole may help with that. I’m not sure about a flush trim bit that will do the whole thing at one time.

-- Bill M. "People change, walnut doesn't" by Gene.

View jerryminer's profile

jerryminer

528 posts in 905 days


#2 posted 02-11-2016 04:46 AM

If you start in the bottom surface, you can temporarily nail or screw a scrap over the center hole and put a pivot in the center.

A trammel arm with a straight bit will get the first 1 1/4” (Straight bit), then flip over and use a flush trim bit. Here’s one with a 2” cutting length: Infinity Bit

You’ll need to be careful as the grain changes—you’ll be cutting “uphill” part of the time (or climb cutting) so take light cuts.

View Jason Sorensen's profile

Jason Sorensen

3 posts in 300 days


#3 posted 02-11-2016 04:52 AM

Thank you both for the information. I will update after I start on it again and see how it goes, going to have a good amount of it finished by this weekend.

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firefighterontheside

13479 posts in 1320 days


#4 posted 02-11-2016 04:57 AM

If you are going to remove as much as 1/2” I would draw the circle and cut most of it away with a jig saw. Removing 1/2” with the router will be tough.

-- Bill M. "People change, walnut doesn't" by Gene.

View 716's profile

716

502 posts in 380 days


#5 posted 02-11-2016 05:53 AM

Removing 1/2” of soft wood with a router should not be a problem, and 1.5 even 2” straight bits do exist. Make sure you inspect the spool carefully, I bet there are a few nails close to the edge.
Would be fun to set tge spool on some humongous lathe and turn it.

-- It's nice!

View MadMark's profile

MadMark

978 posts in 917 days


#6 posted 02-11-2016 06:31 AM

Use a 1/2” roundover bit. You don’t want a sharp corner on the edge. A nice roundover is called for. You can make several passes to full depth with ease.

Put a round plug with a pivot in the hole in the center to guide the router.

Get a lazy-susan plate to set the top on while sanding the edge. With a little practice with the ROS you can spin the top and sand at the same time

M

-- Madmark - Madmark2150@yahoo.com Wiretreefarm.com

View Jason Sorensen's profile

Jason Sorensen

3 posts in 300 days


#7 posted 02-11-2016 04:42 PM

I will be using a Round Over bit after I get the edge flattened, The whole reason for using a custom made jig is to get all of the dents, chunks, and gunk off of the edge. i would like a nice smooth surface to work on it.

I think my plan of action will be as follows.

Route out center hole to make smooth. Cut two circles, one that is larger than the center hole and another that has a lip that matches the inside of the center hole. Then place a piece of all-thread rod through the center with washers and nuts to create a clamp and pivot point. Ensure it is centered, then use a round jig to make the first cut, most likely the bottom half of the table first. Once that is made I can use a deep flat bit with a pilot bearing to finish the cut on the other side. Then follow up with a round over bit on the top side.

I think this will work out best from the information I have gathered here.

Any additional thoughts are welcomed. Thank you all!

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firefighterontheside

13479 posts in 1320 days


#8 posted 02-11-2016 04:47 PM

Make sure to route in the right direction. You don’t want to do a climb cut where the spinning of the bit is pulling the router forward.

-- Bill M. "People change, walnut doesn't" by Gene.

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