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What wood should I use?

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Forum topic by josh12 posted 02-09-2016 08:47 PM 660 views 0 times favorited 17 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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josh12

6 posts in 302 days


02-09-2016 08:47 PM

Topic tags/keywords: wood burning softwood porous recycled used

I am in the processes of starting a company and wanted to know what kind of wood I should use for my product. I am looking for a wood that will absorb and hold a fragrance. Ideally something that is very porous and that is also good for wood burning. I have been looking into it and as of now I am considering using balsa or basswood. Also, I wanted to know where I might be able to find this wood recycled (used pallets, ect.). Any advice would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks, Josh


17 replies so far

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BinghamtonEd

2281 posts in 1834 days


#1 posted 02-09-2016 09:05 PM

What is your product? Is it just wood that you burn that smells nice? If so, have you considered liability if someone burns their house down? Are the fragrances fit to be inhaled after burning (burning a fragrance is different that merely heating it up enough to speed up evaporation)? I’d be wary of using pallet wood, since you have no way of really guaranteeing that it has not been treated, it hasn’t been subjected to chemicals spilled on it, etc.

It sounds as if you have an idea for a product, but you’re looking for someone to tell you what materials to use, how to make it, and where to source the lumber? I don’t mean to sound awful, but what are you doing to further your idea?

-- - The mightiest oak in the forest is just a little nut that held its ground.

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josh12

6 posts in 302 days


#2 posted 02-09-2016 09:17 PM

My product is a wooden air freshener, and I am using a wood burner to put my logo on the product. I have a pretty good idea about how I am going to produce, i.e. using a Stinger to manufacture the shape of my air freshener in large quantities, electric wood burner with stamp logo, etc. I just want to make sure that the wood that I have in mind will be optimal for the air freshener.

View conifur's profile

conifur

955 posts in 616 days


#3 posted 02-09-2016 09:29 PM

Aromatic Cedar!!!LOL

-- Knowledge and experience equals Wisdom, Michael Frankowski

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josh12

6 posts in 302 days


#4 posted 02-09-2016 09:40 PM

I have a couple of fragrances that I will be working with, so the wood needs to be dry. This would allow for better wood burning and the fragrances will last longer.

View bondogaposis's profile

bondogaposis

4032 posts in 1816 days


#5 posted 02-09-2016 09:45 PM

I would recommend red oak.

-- Bondo Gaposis

View dhazelton's profile

dhazelton

2325 posts in 1761 days


#6 posted 02-09-2016 09:47 PM

What happens when the aroma is all gone?

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josh12

6 posts in 302 days


#7 posted 02-09-2016 09:52 PM

You buy a new one!

View DirtyMike's profile

DirtyMike

461 posts in 367 days


#8 posted 02-09-2016 09:54 PM

I think you are on the right track with less dense hardwoods for absorption of your liquid product. good luck

View Jim Finn's profile

Jim Finn

2412 posts in 2387 days


#9 posted 02-09-2016 09:57 PM

Basswood. Soft and cheap.

-- "You may have your PHD but I have my GED and my DD 214"

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josh12

6 posts in 302 days


#10 posted 02-09-2016 10:09 PM

Great! Thanks, any ideas on where I might be able to find recycled basswood, or other cheap softwood? I am in college and have entered into a contest for startups that make an impact. My company’s impact is to give back to the environment by partnering with reforestation programs. We want to harvest our wood in a way that will be sustainable to the environment.

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dhazelton

2325 posts in 1761 days


#11 posted 02-09-2016 10:19 PM

“My company‚Äôs impact is to give back to the environment by partnering with reforestation programs.”

So when the aroma is gone you throw it out and buy another? At least a cardboard air freshener I can toss into my paper recycling.

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josh12

6 posts in 302 days


#12 posted 02-09-2016 10:21 PM

You can plant my air freshener, it is biodegradable and has a seed in it.

View Bill White's profile

Bill White

4456 posts in 3425 days


#13 posted 02-09-2016 10:25 PM

You won’t find basswood or balsa as a pallet wood. WAY too soft.
Bill

-- bill@magraphics.us

View Kazooman's profile

Kazooman

628 posts in 1417 days


#14 posted 02-09-2016 10:49 PM


You can plant my air freshener, it is biodegradable and has a seed in it.

- josh12

Hi Josh,

I know that you are looking for some advice for your college project. I think that you might go a long way to improving the performance of whatever wood you choose by how you mill it. A block of wood soaked in perfume might not cut it. A piece of wood with holes, grooves, etc. cut in it might offer a lot more surface area for absorption and evaporation. Having it sticking out of a reservoir of the liquid would certainly help as I question just how much fragrance you can get stored in a given piece of wood and just how long it would last in use.

As far as the planting goes, those who are evaluating the merits of your proposal might have some questions that you need to research and be prepared to answer (perhaps proactively in your prospectus). For example: what is the shelf life of the product as it relates to the future fertility of the seed? What is the impact of the original load and any residual fragrance on the fertility of the seed? Have you actually demonstrated the answers to these questions or are you just hoping that all will go well in the end? I am not trying to be flippant here, but I am just posing the sort of questions that I, as a scientist, would ask about your proposal.

View nerdbot's profile

nerdbot

97 posts in 826 days


#15 posted 02-09-2016 11:21 PM

Do you burn the wood to release the fragrance? Or is the burning limited to getting your logo on to the wood? Used pallet wood might not be a good option because you don’t know what they were carrying previously, what chemicals they’ve been exposed to, etc.

If you don’t have to burn the wood to release the fragrance, this sounds like diffuser reeds. There are a few DIYs out there that just use wooden skewers you can get at grocery stores.

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