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Willow tree for milling?

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Forum topic by unisaw2 posted 02-09-2010 03:51 AM 3484 views 0 times favorited 12 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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unisaw2

208 posts in 2501 days


02-09-2010 03:51 AM

Topic tags/keywords: willow question milling

I have access to a large willow tree that fell this summer. Main trunk is at least 30” diameter by about 20’ long. Is willow worth milling?

-- JJ - Northern Illinois


12 replies so far

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jack1

2057 posts in 3493 days


#1 posted 02-09-2010 04:05 AM

All the willow I’ve seen is real twisty but that might be good for turners or unique grain. There is usually (at least around here) lots of worm holes too. Is the trunk straight? Can you take the bark off and check for twist?

-- jack -- ...measure once, curse twice!

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unisaw2

208 posts in 2501 days


#2 posted 02-09-2010 04:08 AM

Jack, the trunk is straight but the tree leaned as it got older. Not sure if it is worth the effort to get it to the mill, cut it and dry it. I’ll check it tomorrow for twist. Thanks

-- JJ - Northern Illinois

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jack1

2057 posts in 3493 days


#3 posted 02-09-2010 04:12 AM

I’m not a log expert but if it looks like it’s spiraling, I’d probable be cautious or at least have a real expert give you advise. Good luck.

-- jack -- ...measure once, curse twice!

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unisaw2

208 posts in 2501 days


#4 posted 02-09-2010 04:16 AM

Yea, could be reactionary wood. I’ll talk with my mill tomorrow to see what they think

-- JJ - Northern Illinois

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jack1

2057 posts in 3493 days


#5 posted 02-09-2010 04:20 AM

Have a good friend/mentor that built a door from a great looking doug fir log that had a twist. He “fixed it” 4 times before he trashed it. Claimed it was still moving as he burned it… ;0)

-- jack -- ...measure once, curse twice!

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unisaw2

208 posts in 2501 days


#6 posted 02-09-2010 04:24 AM

Thanks for sharing, very funny :)

-- JJ - Northern Illinois

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a1Jim

115202 posts in 3042 days


#7 posted 02-09-2010 04:31 AM

I’ve never heard of building with willow except twig furniture.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

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unisaw2

208 posts in 2501 days


#8 posted 02-09-2010 04:34 AM

Its looking more and more like its headed for the firewood pile.

-- JJ - Northern Illinois

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EricRFP

106 posts in 2559 days


#9 posted 02-09-2010 07:45 AM

Usually a very plain, boring looking wood. Cut a sample to see if it has anything unique, if not, wait until better wood comes along.

Eric.

-- Eric, NorCal www.rocklinforestproducts.com

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Les Casteel

159 posts in 2525 days


#10 posted 02-13-2010 12:54 AM

Willow is a light weight wood that is on the bottom of the “machinability” scale. Its used for crates, or pallets in my neck of the woods. When cut on a table saw it will usually get the “fuzzies”.

I’ve never turned it and maybe that’s a possibility but my guess is it will turn okay, then develop a fuzzy texture on the surface.

-- Les, Arkansas, www.woodthatrocks.com

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unisaw2

208 posts in 2501 days


#11 posted 02-22-2010 11:12 PM

Had a nice snowstorm last night so I grabbed the camera. The photo is a Shagbark Hickory tree that was topped in a storm. It is not that big, only about 12” diameter, but it is straight, alive, and easy to get to. (right next to the shop.) Do you think it is worth milling?

Looked at the willow again today. It is across a creek, and I’m thinking it will be really hard to get large logs onto a truck.

-- JJ - Northern Illinois

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TreeBones

1826 posts in 3489 days


#12 posted 03-03-2010 06:41 PM

I made some live edge benches last summer from Willow and they turned out great. Big hit and sold well. nice colors. The wood is very light and had tendency to have long splits from the ends on about 50% of the lumber. Easy to sand, soaks up the Watco oil big time.

-- Ron, Twain Harte, Ca. Portable on site Sawmill Service http://westcoastlands.net/Sawmill.html http://westcoastlands.net/SawBucks2/phpBB3 http://www.portablesawmill.info

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