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Forum topic by hig789 posted 02-06-2016 01:24 PM 536 views 0 times favorited 3 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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hig789

24 posts in 302 days


02-06-2016 01:24 PM

Hello all. Recently we tore out a few walls in our house me the intern got me back into wood working. We were looking at entertainment centers/ tv stands be I couldn’t believe the prices on even the simple ones. I got a heck of a deal on a Kobalt sliding compound miter saw at local auction, bought a R3 Kreg jig and built the tv stand they have on their site under the free plans for less than half the price of the ones we were looking at. I have to say I don’t know how I lived with out the Kreg before.

So I’ve been scouring Craigslist in search of some beginner equipment. Got some good deals on a little 13amp Craftsman table saw and a nice older 10” bandsaw for $40. The table saw isn’t great but it was brand new for $50 and it gets the job done for now. My dad gave me a old craftsman router and table today, from what I have read it’s not very good for heavy routing but it will give me something to trim formica with and some light routing.

My wife has decided that she wants a desk for work since we have to room for it now along with a whole list of other things she wants me to build. Right now I am I the process of building a stand for my new 40 gallon salt water reef tank(pics below). It’s made out of 1×3 oak and is coming together nicely.

Hoping to learn a lot here and work on slowly upgrading my tools.








3 replies so far

View bbasiaga's profile

bbasiaga

754 posts in 1456 days


#1 posted 02-06-2016 01:44 PM

Congrats on getting sucked in! Those tools all have some limitations but you will be able to do a lot of good stuff with them, and also in the process learn what you need to upgrade and what you don’t.

I am curious where you found the design for your fish tank stand? Considering a 40 gal tank can weigh almost 350lbs when full of water and rocks I have wondered if there are any neat design tricks to get the load bearing capacity without huge structural members.

Brian

Brian

-- Part of engineering is to know when to put your calculator down and pick up your tools.

View Monte Pittman's profile

Monte Pittman

21991 posts in 1799 days


#2 posted 02-06-2016 01:48 PM

Welcome to Lumberjocks. Hope you enjoy it as much as we do.

The tools are fine for starting out. You can refine them later.

-- Mother Nature created it, I just assemble it.

View hig789's profile

hig789

24 posts in 302 days


#3 posted 02-06-2016 03:00 PM


Congrats on getting sucked in! Those tools all have some limitations but you will be able to do a lot of good stuff with them, and also in the process learn what you need to upgrade and what you don t.

I am curious where you found the design for your fish tank stand? Considering a 40 gal tank can weigh almost 350lbs when full of water and rocks I have wondered if there are any neat design tricks to get the load bearing capacity without huge structural members.

Brian

Brian

- bbasiaga

Yeah they aren’t the greatest but they will do for now. I got the design off reef central for the stand, I have used it in the past on a 90 gallon but it was 2×4’s. Here’s a picture of the design suppose to transfer all the weight straight down to the floor. It’s topped with 3/4” maple plywood and is getting skinned in 1/2” maple. All coated with Rustolium Marine Top Coat to seal it. I also doubled up the 1×3 across the top and bottom rails on the front so I could hopefully get away without having a center brace. But I have a board cut already to add I need to.

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