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Designing a mobile shop stand for Bosch 4100 worksite saw

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Forum topic by leftcoaster posted 02-06-2016 12:46 PM 935 views 0 times favorited 13 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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leftcoaster

82 posts in 338 days


02-06-2016 12:46 PM

My shop is very small and so I must move outdoors for just about anything.

I have the gravity rise stand that came with my saw (used) but i would like to move it to a base under which I can put a drawer or other storage. The stand is really for a contractor traveling to different job sites.

I’ve seen many plans for bases and am puzzled by the ones that position the saw inside 3 walls, with fold up side extensions. Makes sense on the left and for out feed but on the right? That would mean giving up on the saw’s built in extension, which works with the fence to give 25” of rip capacity. Why would someone do this? I’m sure I am missing something… http://www.woodstore.net/plans/shop-plans/tool-bases-stands/335-Quick-Convert-Tablesaw-Router-Station.html Is an example.

An advantage of that design is that one could swap the TS for a router or miter saw by keeping each tool on a removable shelf.

I have the Bosch out feed and left side extensions and use them often. Would the fold up wings be a big advantage? For very long work, I have built roller stands and my workbench is designed to receive at a height just below the TS.

My main goals are

Stay mobile
Stable when in position (will double locking casters be enough? Or do I need to build one of the caster assemblies that is separate from the legs?)
Stay upright
Add storage
Add clearance for below saw dust collection
Maybe use space in right side extension for a router table

Any and all guidance appreciated.


13 replies so far

View kaerlighedsbamsen's profile

kaerlighedsbamsen

1177 posts in 1174 days


#1 posted 02-06-2016 01:22 PM

I have a Bosch GTS 10 that is quite similar to yours.
Would think that a wing to the right would just be in the way and, as you said, prevent the table from expanding (a nice feature of this saw. A wing to the right could be usefull sometimes and one at the back all the times.

A few additional thoughts:
The two most annoying things about this saw is that is it 1: super noisy, and 2: sprays dust all over.
- Would it be possible to build in some sort of noise dampening to the cart? Perhaps around the motor part..
- Most of the dust exits out the front. Would some sort of “apron” cloth or doors be possible to contain the dust..?

Use my saw outdoors as well so would love to see what solution you come up with.
Happy woodworking!

-- "Do or Do not. There is no try." - Yoda

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leftcoaster

82 posts in 338 days


#2 posted 02-07-2016 02:15 PM

Thanks for your note. I’ve found some ideas in a library book for a dust collection bin that would go under the table.

You might like the ideas shared here. http://lumberjocks.com/topics/24962#reply-2359018 for dust collection

I am going to experiment with Roxul for noise control. I have it in my vacuum sound deadening box and it is great!

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kaerlighedsbamsen

1177 posts in 1174 days


#3 posted 02-07-2016 08:37 PM

Those are som clewer solutions! Newer thought about using spray foam.. Would think that getting the saw apart coul beabit difficultthough. Used matress foam myself and that works too.

What is roxul? (googled it but it just seem to be a supplyer of genneral insulation materials)

-- "Do or Do not. There is no try." - Yoda

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leftcoaster

82 posts in 338 days


#4 posted 02-08-2016 03:40 AM

It’s a rock wool insulation called safe n sound. It’s used for soundproofing interior walls.

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Holbs

1371 posts in 1490 days


#5 posted 02-08-2016 02:46 PM

This is what I did for my bosch 4100, and it worked perfectly, minus the irritation of flipping miter saw over to use it even though wanting to use table saw at same time.

-- Yes, my profile picture is of a Carpenter Bee! The name is derived from the Ancient Greek "wood-cutter"

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leftcoaster

82 posts in 338 days


#6 posted 02-08-2016 05:44 PM

Wow Holbs, that looks awesome!

How do you get the dust that drops out of the bottom? Would you be willing to post a pic so that I can see how you built the underside of the cart?

what are you storing in that cabinet on the left front side, next to the blade rack (which is really cool) ?

Really beautiful design.

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Holbs

1371 posts in 1490 days


#7 posted 02-09-2016 02:09 AM

project page http://lumberjocks.com/projects/108410
blog page from start to finish http://lumberjocks.com/Holbs/blog/43163

It’s funny: can’t use it now :) too big since I picked up a Unisaw with 52” rails. You around Nevada? Can give it to you!
No need to go as far as I did with this. It’s 4’ longer than necessary due to my inclusion of fliptop miter saw & sanding table. Was fantastic though with my split top outfeed supports.

-- Yes, my profile picture is of a Carpenter Bee! The name is derived from the Ancient Greek "wood-cutter"

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leftcoaster

82 posts in 338 days


#8 posted 02-09-2016 04:38 AM

Oh I wish! Tragically I don’t have the space to house that beauty. Thanks for the inspiration and kind offer though.

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leftcoaster

82 posts in 338 days


#9 posted 02-09-2016 05:01 AM

Holbs, does the downdraft table go right under the saw? I couldn’t quite make it out.

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Holbs

1371 posts in 1490 days


#10 posted 02-09-2016 08:12 PM

In this picture, you see the 6” wye connection to my duct system. The straight-on branch connects to another wye but this one is 6”x5”x4” as I left open the option of a 4” capped port for overhead table saw dust collection and the 5” continues on to underneath the bosch saw. The second branch of the 6×6x6” wye curves left and then hits the downdraft table (in this picture, not yet installed). I have blast gates after the 6×6x6 wye to have air flow at either table saw or downdraft table.
Second picture is the near final product (tho still had to seal the seams on the ducts).

-- Yes, my profile picture is of a Carpenter Bee! The name is derived from the Ancient Greek "wood-cutter"

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leftcoaster

82 posts in 338 days


#11 posted 02-09-2016 09:45 PM

So the down draft table is not part of the saw base? It’s a separate station for sanding and so forth?

And you just have the duct work directly under the saw?

I was wondering if I should bother with a down draft board under the saw.

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Holbs

1371 posts in 1490 days


#12 posted 02-10-2016 12:17 AM

I built this mobile cart with table saw and miter saw in mind. Had no idea what to put behind miter saw. Fliptop for grinder or my 10” delta drill press? But then I came to realize I need a downdraft sanding station since I’ve never had one before. So that filled up that empty void. It’s not nailed or glue to anything, just sits by gravity friction on the far & middle rail. Can easily remove it for whatever purpose.

The duct work goes under the saw then 45 degree & 45 degree pointing right at the saw blade.
Here is another picture that shows off the 3 sections. I was washing my garage floor for the summer :)

-- Yes, my profile picture is of a Carpenter Bee! The name is derived from the Ancient Greek "wood-cutter"

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leftcoaster

82 posts in 338 days


#13 posted 02-10-2016 01:03 AM

Thanks Holbs—it really is a marvelous build.

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