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Drum Sander ok to use on softwoods like pine?

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Forum topic by golden478 posted 02-05-2016 10:43 PM 595 views 0 times favorited 5 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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golden478

7 posts in 336 days


02-05-2016 10:43 PM

Topic tags/keywords: drum sander finishing softwoods pine question

Looking to buy a Supermax 25-50 for some radiata pine panels. I recall reading a comment somewhere online (that I can no longer find) that a drum sander won’t work well on softwoods like pine. Not sure what kind of problems they were referring to, if anyone can enlighten me I would appreciate it.

The panels I use are knot-free radiata pine.

Supermax says the drum sander will work on softwoods, just that if sap is present it can cause the paper to gum up.

Thanks for any comments, looking to pull the trigger and buy this thing soon!


5 replies so far

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RogR

53 posts in 330 days


#1 posted 02-05-2016 10:48 PM

My Jet drum sander does OK with cedar – even softer than P. radiata. Dust evacuation is mandatory and I strongly encourage the use of carefully aligned infeed and outfeed roller tables.

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pjones46

986 posts in 2108 days


#2 posted 02-05-2016 11:56 PM

The pitch/resin in pine gums up the abrasive. Hate using pine, switch to poplar.

-- Respectfully, Paul

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golden478

7 posts in 336 days


#3 posted 02-06-2016 12:28 AM

Thanks for your reply, pjones46. I’m working with clear, kiln-dried pine without any knots or visible sap pockets. I should be in good shape, right? Or is the resin/pitch throughout all pine, and not necessarily visible?

I would prefer poplar too, but just so happen to have a bunch of radiata pine available that I would like to use up.

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pjones46

986 posts in 2108 days


#4 posted 02-06-2016 01:02 AM

Even with the kiln-dried pine without any knots or visible sap pockets it will still gum up the abrasive in short order. I work with nothing but kiln-dried woods and pine is the worst. It may even cause burning and groves once it fills the abrasive. If you are using cloth backed belts you can soak them in Simple green overnight then use a wire brush to clean off the gum. Wash them off with plain water and let dry and you should be able to use them again but will not work as well as new abrasive.

-- Respectfully, Paul

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golden478

7 posts in 336 days


#5 posted 02-06-2016 01:20 AM

Thanks for the info, Paul. Very helpful. Cleaning the belts sounds like a pain but I’m glad to know it can be done as needed. I appreciate the tips! Thanks again.

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