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Bandsaw tire won't stay on

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Forum topic by mramseyISU posted 02-05-2016 03:12 AM 609 views 0 times favorited 13 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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mramseyISU

419 posts in 1013 days


02-05-2016 03:12 AM

Topic tags/keywords: bandsaw

So I’m working on getting an old walker turner bandsaw back in service and I’ve got almost everything cleaned, lubed and lined up. Problem is that the bottom urethane tire won’t stay put it’s slipping off and causing my band is coming loose. It’s happened 3 times tonight. The tires are both brand new and the top one is staying put. Any ideas on how to hold it in place? Contact cement maybe?

-- Trust me I'm an engineer.


13 replies so far

View TheWoodRaccoon's profile

TheWoodRaccoon

364 posts in 398 days


#1 posted 02-05-2016 03:52 AM

Hmm….can you post some pictures? I would avoid using adhesive if possible. Maybe you have the wrong size tires?

-- still trying to think of a clever signature......

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conifur

955 posts in 620 days


#2 posted 02-05-2016 04:08 AM

Or the bottom wheel is different diameter?

-- Knowledge and experience equals Wisdom, Michael Frankowski

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

4247 posts in 1667 days


#3 posted 02-05-2016 04:10 AM

What happened to the Delta you were working on and what size is your WT??!? :)

Typically anything over 14” should have the tires glued on due to centrifugal force. Most people use 3M 1300 rubber adhesive and is what most aftermarket suppliers recommend (like Carter). Some also suggest epoxy, and while that may work, I can’t imagine getting the stuff off should you need to replace the tires again down the road. Another fairly popular adhesive is 3M 5200 adhesive.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

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mramseyISU

419 posts in 1013 days


#4 posted 02-05-2016 03:48 PM


What happened to the Delta you were working on and what size is your WT??!? :)

Typically anything over 14” should have the tires glued on due to centrifugal force. Most people use 3M 1300 rubber adhesive and is what most aftermarket suppliers recommend (like Carter). Some also suggest epoxy, and while that may work, I can t imagine getting the stuff off should you need to replace the tires again down the road. Another fairly popular adhesive is 3M 5200 adhesive.

Cheers,
Brad

- MrUnix

Well I thought it was a Rockwell until I got it cleaned up and discovered it was a walker turner. It’s a 14 inch saw. I’m attaching a picture of what it looks like after I flip the switch.

-- Trust me I'm an engineer.

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johnstoneb

2151 posts in 1641 days


#5 posted 02-05-2016 04:12 PM

Is the wheel slightly undersize? I put urethane tires on a 12” saw. I really had to work at it they were so tight no way I needed any adhesive. Is it possible the wheel is warped than the movement of the wheel is working the tire off?

-- Bruce, Boise, ID

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waho6o9

7180 posts in 2045 days


#6 posted 02-05-2016 04:13 PM

How are the bearings?

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mramseyISU

419 posts in 1013 days


#7 posted 02-05-2016 04:38 PM



Is the wheel slightly undersize? I put urethane tires on a 12” saw. I really had to work at it they were so tight no way I needed any adhesive. Is it possible the wheel is warped than the movement of the wheel is working the tire off?

- johnstoneb

It takes everything I’ve got to get them put on so the wheel should be the right size. Also I’m spinning it by hand just to make sure it’s tracking right before I close the doors and flip the switch.


How are the bearings?

- waho6o9

They seem to be ok. Not a lot of play in the wheel from what I can tell but I haven’t put an indicator on the wheel to check for runout or anything. I might try that and see what I come up with. I supposed worn bearings on a 60 year old saw wouldn’t be all that odd.

-- Trust me I'm an engineer.

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

4247 posts in 1667 days


#8 posted 02-05-2016 04:58 PM

Is that picture you posted what it looked like when you first got it, or after you got it ”cleaned, lubed and lined up”?? If it’s the later, it looks like there is still old tire/glue residue on the wheel and those tires sure don’t look new. Also, I know the Deltas had a crowned wheel, but not sure about the WT… it the wheel crowned?

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

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mramseyISU

419 posts in 1013 days


#9 posted 02-05-2016 05:19 PM

What you’re seeing is a new tire that sat in the machine for a while but not installed. Those tires were bought about 10 years ago but never installed. That plus my grimy hands from using penetrating oil on the guide adjustments make the tires look worse than they are. As far as crap on the wheels goes I wouldn’t call that old tire or glue, it looks like it ran without the tires at one point and wore in some grooves. I know on large industrial bandsaws they run the band on a crowned solid metal wheel so somebody may have just decided to run this one like that at one time. I’m not sure if this particular wheel has a crown on it.

-- Trust me I'm an engineer.

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MrUnix

4247 posts in 1667 days


#10 posted 02-05-2016 05:37 PM

I’m pretty sure that those wheels are not crowned, meaning than you need to install tires and then crown them before you can use it. Those ‘grooves’ should be from the factory, and allow the glue to get better adhesion… but you need to clean them up well and get rid of any residue before re-installing. And Urethane tires might not be the best option for that saw – particularly ones that have been sitting around for 10 years. If you do use them, they probably should be glued on if for no other reason than to allow you to crown them. There are several threads on restoring those old 14” WT’s over at OWWM, and this one might be particularly useful:

Walker-Turner 14 inch Band Saw, tires, crowning and accessories

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

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mramseyISU

419 posts in 1013 days


#11 posted 02-05-2016 06:19 PM

Thanks Brad. I was searching over at OWWM and hadn’t come across anything as useful as that thread yet.

-- Trust me I'm an engineer.

View gfadvm's profile

gfadvm

14940 posts in 2158 days


#12 posted 02-06-2016 01:20 AM

I used GOOP from the auto parts store when I had tire problems on my 17” Grizz. It was meant to be a temporary fix to get me through a project until new tires arrived. That was several years ago and the old tires are still in place.

-- " I'll try to be nicer, if you'll try to be smarter" gfadvm

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mramseyISU

419 posts in 1013 days


#13 posted 02-08-2016 02:34 PM

I wound up using a little contact cement in a spray can to get it stuck on. So far so good. The saw still needs a little fine tuning with the guides but the blade it tracking and the tire is staying out so I’m going to call it a win. Thanks for the advise guys.

-- Trust me I'm an engineer.

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