LumberJocks

Big Gulp

  • Advertise with us

« back to Power Tools, Hardware and Accessories forum

Forum topic by 716 posted 02-03-2016 11:43 PM 1061 views 0 times favorited 22 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View 716's profile

716

502 posts in 379 days


02-03-2016 11:43 PM

Did anyone managed effectively use this thing on a table saw ?

-- It's nice!


22 replies so far

View hotbyte's profile

hotbyte

842 posts in 2438 days


#1 posted 02-04-2016 12:15 AM

For overhead/above table use? I would think one of the designs that are just over blade would work better.

If below table, there is a more flat square looking DC adapter.

View Kelly's profile

Kelly

1113 posts in 2407 days


#2 posted 02-04-2016 12:22 AM

I have as much luck drawing off the bottom port and setting second [4”] hose near the blade [when I can’t use the overarm collector].

I picked up a trip pod like someone would use in a presentation and attached a pieces of plywood to the top, which has a cut-out to hold the hose. This allows me to set it up near the table saw, band saw or a item being sanded.

View ohtimberwolf's profile

ohtimberwolf

634 posts in 1815 days


#3 posted 02-04-2016 01:28 AM

Kelly, a picture would be nice. larry

-- Just a barn cat, now gone to cat heaven.

View ohtimberwolf's profile

ohtimberwolf

634 posts in 1815 days


#4 posted 02-04-2016 01:30 AM

716, I built one nearly like that using a metal slanted roof flange and it keeps the under-neith part of the saw clean. I would have bought that if I had known about it.

-- Just a barn cat, now gone to cat heaven.

View Kelly's profile

Kelly

1113 posts in 2407 days


#5 posted 02-04-2016 03:34 AM

Will try to tend that, ohtimberwolf, before I head off out tomorrow.

View Kelly's profile

Kelly

1113 posts in 2407 days


#6 posted 02-04-2016 05:21 PM

ohtimberwolf, I staged some photos to show you my use of a presentation tripod to position a secondary hose for dust collection.

Since the tripod can raise and lower, it’s easy to position it lower for the table saw or sanding, or raise it for the band saw.

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

3937 posts in 1956 days


#7 posted 02-04-2016 06:38 PM

I could see that being useful for a miter saw (maybe) and an RAS, I use mine on the lathe (when sanding). Not sure how I would use it on a table saw.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View 716's profile

716

502 posts in 379 days


#8 posted 02-04-2016 08:27 PM



I could see that being useful for a miter saw (maybe) and an RAS, I use mine on the lathe (when sanding). Not sure how I would use it on a table saw.

- Fred Hargis

Like this ?

-- It's nice!

View Kelly's profile

Kelly

1113 posts in 2407 days


#9 posted 02-04-2016 08:35 PM

If your collector has any significant draw, setting it near or in the path the dust and chips not being pushed or pulled down the band saw or table saw plates results in vastly improved dust and chip collection than relying on the stock only the stock ports.

When I was cutting tenons, I just set it nearly straight behind the blade and it reduced the tossings from the blade to a fraction. That actually worked better than having the hose very close to and at the side of the blade, in that situation. When I was cutting logs on the band saw, with the blade on the right side of the log, for example, it grabbed everything that would have gone air born, when the hose was about five inches off the blade and log.

Each cutting operation might require a minor or major shift, but that’s just the name of the game. The stand just allows me to position the hose somewhere and have it stay, whether it’s at a sander, scroll saw or whatever.

View Kelly's profile

Kelly

1113 posts in 2407 days


#10 posted 02-04-2016 08:48 PM

I tried a bigger hood and a wider hood (floor sweep), but both gained me less than focusing the collection point with just the hose.

My sanding station, on the other hand, needed a hood, on a larger scale, to focus collection and still be of use. To work on my table saw, a hood would have to go over the blade, like my over-arm collector, but such an approach proves impossible with the tenon jig and impractical in others.

Another thing that would improve the table saw collection would be increasing the draw area around the throat plate, without losing the zero clearance effect.

http://lumberjocks.com/projects/195330

View Kelly's profile

Kelly

1113 posts in 2407 days


#11 posted 02-04-2016 08:52 PM

I might mention, for my lathe, I made a couple, like in your drawing. One is for short work and one for longer work. Rather than tall, since little is tossed off high when turning and that would reduce efficiency, I kept them small, to get them as close to the work as possible. From the back, it catches all the light stuff, when sanding, and a little, when turning.

Later, I’m going make one which comes up from the bottom front, and that should get the draw closer. I might start off with a shop floor (wide) nozzle to get a feel for the effect and to determine what I can get away with without interfering with the turning operation. At least that’s the theory.

View Kelly's profile

Kelly

1113 posts in 2407 days


#12 posted 02-04-2016 09:28 PM

I might mention, for my lathe, I made a couple, like in your drawing. One is for short work and one for longer work. Rather than tall, since little is tossed off high when turning, and that would reduce efficiency, I kept them small, to get them as close to the work as possible. From the back, it catches all the light stuff, when sanding, and a little, when turning.

Later, I’m going make one which comes up from the bottom front, and that should get the draw closer. At least that’s the theory.

View ohtimberwolf's profile

ohtimberwolf

634 posts in 1815 days


#13 posted 02-04-2016 10:11 PM

Thanks for the pictures as it makes it easy to see how it is done. I will try it. larry

-- Just a barn cat, now gone to cat heaven.

View 716's profile

716

502 posts in 379 days


#14 posted 02-05-2016 12:06 AM

Another thing that would improve the table saw collection would be increasing the draw area around the throat plate, without losing the zero clearance effect.

- Kelly


You mean like the one below? May not be effective as the dust that does not fall inside the cabinet is thrown forward away from the throat plate. By the time it slows down enough for the dust collector suction to catch it is too far from the plate.

-- It's nice!

View splatman's profile

splatman

558 posts in 862 days


#15 posted 02-05-2016 03:47 AM

Might help to have fewer holes at the back and more holes at the front. Most dust that lands on the table usually lands near/around the front anyway (experience).
Another idea worth testing: A series of holes centered on the blade slot, such that the slot edges resemble the edges of an old-fashioned postage stamp. The idea is to combine the performance of a zero-clearance plate with the (probable) effectiveness of downdraft holes right at the source of the dust.

showing 1 through 15 of 22 replies

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com