LumberJocks

How to stain a fine line help!

  • Advertise with us

« back to Woodworking Skill Share forum

Forum topic by SBOhio posted 02-06-2010 03:41 PM 4705 views 0 times favorited 26 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View SBOhio's profile

SBOhio

24 posts in 1714 days


02-06-2010 03:41 PM

Building a workbench with a 3” white oak butcher block style top. Would like to leave the top a natural color. Last night I glued on the finger jointed skirt which is a contrasting. dark stained 1 3/4” wide white oak. The problem is after getting the top all clamped up I realized it had creaped up above the rest of the top just enough that I now know it will have to sanded back down level with the rest of the top. Thi s of coarse will have to be restained. I am concerned about how I can restain a clean line between the two boards? I’m thinking that even with masking tape the oil stain will bleed under and on to the adjacent board? Any help on how to stain a clean llne and keep it just on the skirt board? Kind of like Charleton Heston as Moses parting the Red Sea!


26 replies so far

View Moron's profile

Moron

4666 posts in 2546 days


#1 posted 02-06-2010 03:46 PM

there is new masking tape out there, not the green or blue, thats stops creep. I have no idea where to buy it.

-- "Good artists borrow, great artists steal”…..Picasso

View SBOhio's profile

SBOhio

24 posts in 1714 days


#2 posted 02-06-2010 04:10 PM

I did see a green tape at SW store called once called “Frogskin” . Do you think that was it or do you have any experience with it?

View CharlieM1958's profile

CharlieM1958

15696 posts in 2871 days


#3 posted 02-06-2010 05:01 PM

You could rout a shallow channel along the joint using an edge guide, and fill it with a colored epoxy or bondo, Then when you restain the edging, the inlaid border would act as a barrier to prevent creeping of the stain.

-- Charlie M. "Woodworking - patience = firewood"

View Sawkerf's profile

Sawkerf

1730 posts in 1721 days


#4 posted 02-06-2010 05:25 PM

I vote with Charlie M on doing a groove to prevent “creep”, although filling it with epoxy or bondo might create staining problems on either side of the groove as it cures.

When I made this piece a few years ago, I ran the solid oak band pieces for the top down the TS cutting a small (1/8” x 1/8”) rabbet on the inside edges. The rabbets trapped the bleed over when I stained, and a fine tipped marking pen colored the groove black before I put on the finish.

Photobucket

-- Adversity doesn't build character...................it reveals it.

View Dark_Lightning's profile

Dark_Lightning

1714 posts in 1761 days


#5 posted 02-06-2010 06:08 PM

You might try the tan-colored paint masking tape (3M coms to mind) from an automotive supply. It keeps even lacquer from bleeding into adjacent areas. Try on scraps first. Make sure that the scrap has the same finish, of course. It may bleed, anyway, due to the texture of the wood. Good luck!

View woodsmithshop's profile

woodsmithshop

1147 posts in 2198 days


#6 posted 02-06-2010 06:24 PM

would packing tape work?

-- Smitty!!!

View Sawkerf's profile

Sawkerf

1730 posts in 1721 days


#7 posted 02-06-2010 07:28 PM

I doubt if automotive tape would help very much on wood. Unlike wood, auto bodies aren’t very porus and properly applied tape will stop surface bleedover. On wood, even the best application of tape can’t stop bleeding under it.

-- Adversity doesn't build character...................it reveals it.

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

112083 posts in 2230 days


#8 posted 02-06-2010 07:39 PM

The green tape is made for creep but Charlies idea is the safest.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View CharlieM1958's profile

CharlieM1958

15696 posts in 2871 days


#9 posted 02-06-2010 08:16 PM

Sawkerf, I’ve used Inlace, fiberglass resin, and epoxy in that way, and never had a problem with colors bleeding. You have to overfill the groove a bit, then sand the entire surface smooth after it has cured.

-- Charlie M. "Woodworking - patience = firewood"

View Sawkerf's profile

Sawkerf

1730 posts in 1721 days


#10 posted 02-06-2010 10:02 PM

Charlie -
I used epoxy to fill the holes in this table top made from recycled redwood and had some staining issues. Maybe it was due to the softness of redwood. Not a problem, however, since the discolorations were part of the “charm”. – lol

Photobucket

-- Adversity doesn't build character...................it reveals it.

View Scott Bryan's profile

Scott Bryan

27251 posts in 2474 days


#11 posted 02-06-2010 10:23 PM

Frog tape does prevent creep but it is designed to work with latex paints. This will not help you in this case since you are using an oil base stain.

-- Challenges are what make life interesting; overcoming them is what makes life meaningful- Joshua Marine

View tnwood's profile

tnwood

200 posts in 1739 days


#12 posted 02-07-2010 12:29 AM

Doesn’t some of this depend on the stain you use? I have been fairly successful using the gel stains without significant creep under masking tape. But any very fluid stain or dye is not going to be stopped by tape since the absorption is through the wood pore structure.

View Todd A. Clippinger's profile

Todd A. Clippinger

8775 posts in 2752 days


#13 posted 02-07-2010 01:33 AM

The wood itself can wick stain even if it has finish on it.

For instance, if you pre-finished the area that you did not want stained then went on to stain the unfinished bands. The pores of the wood itself can potentially wick the stain under the finish.

Charlie’s suggestion provides the best barrier if it works with the overall look of your project.

I use the green tape often as a remodeling contractor and it works great for paint but stain is a different animal. The tape can be had at any Sherwin Williams store and I do believe Home Depot carries it but I am unsure about Lowe’s.

-- Todd A. Clippinger, Montana, http://americancraftsmanworkshop.com

View SBOhio's profile

SBOhio

24 posts in 1714 days


#14 posted 02-07-2010 02:28 AM

Wow guys, I do appreciate all the feedback. I am fairly new to the forum and serious woodworking but enjoy and learn every day in the shop. CharlieM, I haven’t done any inlay work. Are these colored epoxys special to for woodworkers or regular epoxy you color some how? Would they hold up to the rigors of a workbench? I would think the epoxy would hold up better than bondo. My last experience with bondo was on my ‘65’ Impala , ‘Spot’ (Red primer, grey primer, black primer etc.. First car, I tried to fill some of the swiss cheese with bondo and most of it fell out the first winter. Wouldn’t the epoxy, or fiberglass , or any inlay have to be sanded? That would put me back to square one, in that I’d be sanding the adjacent skirt stain off again? I must be missing something. I did do a test today with green tape. Heated it a little with a hair dryer and burnished it with a piece of rounded steel to help seal better. Still bled through slightly in the pores as many here have mentioned. Actually not bad though. Thought it would pass the 10’ rule but I would still no it wasn’t right. Sawkerf, what is the white inlay in your table? That is really beutiful. Both pieces great for that matter!

View CharlieM1958's profile

CharlieM1958

15696 posts in 2871 days


#15 posted 02-07-2010 02:34 AM

Fiberglass resin is probably the easiest stuff to work with… just the regular stuff you can find at the hardware store. It comes in a can, with a separate tube of hardener that you add right before use. You can mix in crushed stone of any color (from a craft store or online), and it will hold up better than the rest of the workbench.

-- Charlie M. "Woodworking - patience = firewood"

showing 1 through 15 of 26 replies

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

GardenTenders.com :: gardening showcase