LumberJocks

Help identifying old hand plane

  • Advertise with us

« back to Power Tools, Hardware and Accessories forum

Forum topic by Scotty Stepp posted 02-06-2010 05:08 AM 5122 views 0 times favorited 18 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View Scotty Stepp's profile

Scotty Stepp

25 posts in 2316 days


02-06-2010 05:08 AM

Gentlemen,
Anyone know what this is and how much it might be worth?

It measures:
overall length-8.5’‘
width-2’‘

Blade:
length-4.75’‘
width-1.75

The only identifying mark is a “3 & 4” on the face of the frog.

Many thanks!!!

Old Plane
old plane 2
old plane 3
Old plane 4


18 replies so far

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

112939 posts in 2331 days


#1 posted 02-06-2010 05:20 AM

Rusty brand LOL sorry no help.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View WayneC's profile

WayneC

12302 posts in 2851 days


#2 posted 02-06-2010 05:43 AM

Not sure as well…

-- We must guard our enthusiasm as we would our life - James Krenov

View knotscott's profile

knotscott

5610 posts in 2129 days


#3 posted 02-06-2010 06:08 AM

It’s old, interesting, and unusual but I can’t tell you much more about it.

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

View blackcherry's profile

blackcherry

3209 posts in 2577 days


#4 posted 02-06-2010 06:44 AM

What ever you do don’t clean it up until it’s identified. I can say it old and probably late 1900”s. I will have to check some old reference sources so be patient…Blkcherry

View blackcherry's profile

blackcherry

3209 posts in 2577 days


#5 posted 02-06-2010 06:53 AM

I do believe it from the, get this 1850 to 1890 Stanley No. 3 plane. What do you think of that and I can’t emphasize enough don’t clean it one bit…Blkcherry

View blackcherry's profile

blackcherry

3209 posts in 2577 days


#6 posted 02-06-2010 07:01 AM

Stanley produced a very short-lived frog design during the early 1870’s (pictured in the image to the left). This design has a frog that is about 1/2 the length of the normal frog, and is nearly identical to the design that Leonard Bailey was producing when he got pissed off at Stanley and decided to come up with a new line of bench planes, his Victor line. Stanley, realizing the genius of Leonard Bailey, may have thought that his new design would prove to be a threat to the conventional design and then decided to mimic his. Bailey’s Victor design certainly proved easier to manufacture as there was less machining involved, but it does have two real flaws: there is no ability to adjust the frog to open or close the mouth; and the cross-rib that carries the frog is susceptible to cracking or breaking due to the stress placed on it from overtightening the lever cap or during planing. This frog is secured to the cross-rib via two screws that are oriented horizontally. Nice attempt Leonard and Stanley, especially since one size frog could be used on multiple sizes of the bench planes (#3 through #8), but the one frog fits all definitely didn’t satisfy all users of the planes.

Many folks find it confusing about whether Stanley or Bailey made these planes. The answer is, both made them. Leonard Bailey, while working in happening Boston, Massachusetts during the 1850’s and 1860’s, came upon the fundamental design of planes with which we are all familiar. These planes have very little in the way of markings, except on the brass nut where sometimes “BAILEY” and “BOSTON” are stamped. Stanley, having been a manufacturer of rules, levels, squares, etc for some 15 years, was looking to expand their toolmaking business, so they bought out Bailey’s patents in 1869. They produced the planes with little change, where the only Stanley markings were on the iron and on the lateral adjustment lever. In 1902, as homage to Bailey, Stanley started making their castings with “BAILEY” embossed in them – these planes were made by Stanley, and Stanley alone. In 1925, lever caps were first offered with “STANLEY” embossed in them, while the bottom castings were still being made with “BAILEY” cast into them. Many people believe that the lever caps are replaced on these models or that they aren’t Stanley products since they have “BAILEY” on them. They most assuredly are Stanley products. The Bailey-made stuff, from Boston, is very scarce and highly prized by collectors.

View Alonso's profile

Alonso

946 posts in 1992 days


#7 posted 02-06-2010 07:06 AM

which image on the left?

-- The things I make may be for others, but how I make them is for me.

View blackcherry's profile

blackcherry

3209 posts in 2577 days


#8 posted 02-06-2010 07:07 AM

I believe that this site will identify and give you the est date &. cost of this rare fine. I can be sure that it from the late 1900’s. Great fine….http://www.supertool.com/StanleyBG/stan1.htm..Blkcherry

View Alonso's profile

Alonso

946 posts in 1992 days


#9 posted 02-06-2010 07:09 AM

broken link…

-- The things I make may be for others, but how I make them is for me.

View WayneC's profile

WayneC

12302 posts in 2851 days


#10 posted 02-06-2010 07:32 AM

Looks like the link http://www.supertool.com/StanleyBG/stan1.htm mixed with other text.. Not sure this is a stanley.

-- We must guard our enthusiasm as we would our life - James Krenov

View Alonso's profile

Alonso

946 posts in 1992 days


#11 posted 02-06-2010 07:37 AM

I agree with Wayne, there’s no sign of being Stanley Bailey as far as I know, even though that big flat knob seems familiar with me, I think I saw it before I just can’t remember where….still looking

-- The things I make may be for others, but how I make them is for me.

View Scotty Stepp's profile

Scotty Stepp

25 posts in 2316 days


#12 posted 02-06-2010 03:38 PM

I am certainly NOT going to touch this plane with anything…thanks for the advice.

Jim Crammond from sawmill creek says: That plane is known as a Chaplin’s patent and was manufactured by Tower and Lyon. I think they were produced from about 1875 to the early 1900s. There were several different models produced over those years.

I believe it is a Chaplin’s original patent #203 Smoothing seen here.

Type 3, (Oct 1887 Tower and Lyon advert “Carpentry and Building”), Smooth base and corrugated base (corrugations on the top of the base), i.e. the 12** series. Adjustable throat option on some planes, frog plate now hollowed out shape to reduce friction on the blade, and the lever cap also shaped on the back with a central rib. Optional iron or wooden handle. Tower and Lyon on blades. On the block planes the adjustment paddle is teardrop shape, and the knob has fine knurling.

Here is some history on Chaplin.

After closer inspection;
on the blade is says: Tower and Lyon; New York; 772 july 4

Where do collectors go to purchase these old planes? I can’t believe this plane is from the 19c.

Thanks for the help guys. I find these old planes fascinating!!!

View blackcherry's profile

blackcherry

3209 posts in 2577 days


#13 posted 02-06-2010 04:40 PM

At least I was right about the dating part anyway this is a nice and rare fine…I need to find the site of a collector in the Northwest who is extremely knowledgeable about old plane and pricing….I will send to you directly. Careful these old plane can become a addiction…Blkcherry I got the site leach@supertool.com good luck.

View blackcherry's profile

blackcherry

3209 posts in 2577 days


#14 posted 02-06-2010 06:01 PM

I found more info….check this site out…http://www.antique-used-tools.com/chaplin.htm... he also has some pic and pricing on come Chaplin plane ranging from 350 to 500 dollars.

View Scotty Stepp's profile

Scotty Stepp

25 posts in 2316 days


#15 posted 02-06-2010 06:28 PM

Many thanks blackcherry. I sent a couple of emails out to the experts. I’ll let you know what I find out.

showing 1 through 15 of 18 replies

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

GardenTenders.com :: gardening showcase