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Forum topic by theAlaskan posted 02-01-2016 10:36 PM 515 views 0 times favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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theAlaskan

8 posts in 1071 days


02-01-2016 10:36 PM

Hi all,

so I’m wanting to make a really nice jewelry box as an anniversary gift for my wife. I’ve got a few questions about some ideas and methods I want to use. I’m not as familiar with working in the smaller thicknesses of wood or many exotic woods, and would like some input.

Details: I want to make a jewelry box with wood that is 1/4” thick so that it has a “lighter” or more proportional look to it. The woods I’m planning to use are spalted maple and ebony for small trim pieces.

Q#1. Would it be better to use a solid 1/4” piece, or make my own “plywood” out of 2 1/8” pieces laminated together? and why. my thoughts are that if done right, the plywood at that size would be more dimensionally stable and easier to work with and might even be stronger???

Q#2. are there any tips i should know about working with spalted woods?

Q#3. If I were to do a plywood, what would be a good backing wood? (this wood wouldn’t be seen, as the inside will be covered in velvet)

Q#4. Is this just a crazy idea that will be difficult to execute??

some of my ideas for this project come from the wood worker Tom Fidgen and his no power tools approach to many things. Specifically his “good doctors medicine Chest” project. If you don’t know who I’m talking about a quick google search would be better than anything i could summarize.

Thanks in advance,
Max


11 replies so far

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theAlaskan

8 posts in 1071 days


#1 posted 02-01-2016 10:57 PM

Forgot a question

#4. For small projects like this , do splines help make stronger corners and glue joints?

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jmartel

6570 posts in 1613 days


#2 posted 02-01-2016 10:58 PM

I’d probably just use 1/4” wood, myself. Probably going to be a personal choice thing, but the 2 1/8” pieces won’t be any stronger. Won’t be any more dimensionally stable unless you use real plywood.

I haven’t done much work with spalted woods, but I’ve seen a lot of references to using thinned epoxy or CA glue if the spalted areas aren’t completely solid (punky).

One thing you could do is use 1/4” plywood and veneer it. Pretty simple to do on small panels like that. Cut 1/8” rabbets on all the outside corners and put some solid wood for edge banding

EDIT: For your question #4, splines do make them stronger, but it’s not necessary. Make the grain run horizontal instead of vertical and you won’t have any issues. A mitered joint is quite strong, despite what many people claim.

-- The quality of one's woodworking is directly related to the amount of flannel worn.

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MadMark

978 posts in 916 days


#3 posted 02-01-2016 11:58 PM

Make a lot of 1/4” boxes & haven’t had a joint failure or cracked wall.

Making DIY ply is hard at those dims. Most planers stop at 1/4” so how would you get a flat 1/8” panel suitable for gluing?

M

-- Madmark - Madmark2150@yahoo.com Wiretreefarm.com

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theAlaskan

8 posts in 1071 days


#4 posted 02-02-2016 12:13 AM

@ madmark

I was planing on purchasing thick stock (or thin stock a little over 1/4 for some woods) and resawing to a little over 1/8” and then using a homemade router planer to get the final dimension. My whole plan relies heavily on my router planer and resawing of thick stock

@jmartel

thanks for the tips so far!!

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MadMark

978 posts in 916 days


#5 posted 02-02-2016 12:23 AM

We make single layer boxes down to 1/4” with no structural isses with hardwood, pine, however can be snapped with the fingers at the same scale. Maple & ebony will be fine.

M

-- Madmark - Madmark2150@yahoo.com Wiretreefarm.com

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theAlaskan

8 posts in 1071 days


#6 posted 02-02-2016 10:36 PM

cool!

anyone have any experience working with African Ebony? how well does it glue, what kind would be recommended?

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MadMark

978 posts in 916 days


#7 posted 02-03-2016 03:39 PM

I’ve used Elmer’s wood glue on ebony with good results. Clamping pressure is key.

M

-- Madmark - Madmark2150@yahoo.com Wiretreefarm.com

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theAlaskan

8 posts in 1071 days


#8 posted 02-03-2016 05:12 PM

clamping pressure… as in not too tight, or as tight as you can?

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jmartel

6570 posts in 1613 days


#9 posted 02-03-2016 06:33 PM

Unless you’re using 3/4” pipe clamps and clamping them as hard as they will possibly go, you aren’t going to run into an issue of clamping too tight. Most other clamps won’t clamp enough to cause glue starvation.

-- The quality of one's woodworking is directly related to the amount of flannel worn.

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theAlaskan

8 posts in 1071 days


#10 posted 02-03-2016 08:01 PM

thanks again for all the help and tips. I had heard that starving the joints was something to worry about, especially with epoxy glues. HAHA no, don’t think there’ll be any bar clamps of that size involved in this project

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MadMark

978 posts in 916 days


#11 posted 02-03-2016 09:20 PM

If you’ve correctly buttered the wood for 100% glue coverage, you should stop when there are no visible gaps and you have slight even glue squeeze out. I use a piece of scrap Lexan as a glue spreader to get smooth even glue coverage. Elmer’s glue should dry and contract away any squeeze out on inside corners. Razor off excess on outside corners and sand all round.

M

-- Madmark - Madmark2150@yahoo.com Wiretreefarm.com

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