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Help! Mantle adhesive failure.

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Forum topic by LiveEdge posted 02-01-2016 05:39 PM 499 views 0 times favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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LiveEdge

486 posts in 1087 days


02-01-2016 05:39 PM

Topic tags/keywords: juniper mantle adhesive

I installed a juniper mantle over my fireplace last year and it included an eight inch piece of decorative juniper laid flat against the wall. My daughter noticed yesterday that it was loose and sure enough it looks like the adhesive caulk failed (I’ll have to track down exactly what I used, but it was recommended for the project). I’m trying to devise ways to readhere and why it failed.

The piece has a natural bow to it (not extreme, but certainly present) so one challenge was getting enough pressure on the wood while the caulk cured. I wound up using some boards wedged at an angle against it.

Looking at the caulk pattern, do you think I just didn’t use enough and should retry with more?
Is it the failure coming from trying to adhere to the plaster? (the wall is a thin layer of plaster over sheet rock)

I could, of course, screw the board to the wall, but I’m trying to avoid because I don’t want the filled holes. The studs behind are bound to be asymmetric and so, to me, it will look bad. But maybe this is my only option?

Any thoughts would be welcome!



11 replies so far

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LiveEdge

486 posts in 1087 days


#1 posted 02-01-2016 05:43 PM

I looked back and used Loctite PL Premium Polyurethane Construction Adhesive

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pintodeluxe

4859 posts in 2280 days


#2 posted 02-01-2016 05:50 PM

Drill countersunk holes and attach to the drywall with screws. Just make the holes, and mock up the installation to mark the hole location on the wall with a pencil. Then install screw-in metal drywall anchors.
Finally plug the holes with matching or contrasting material cut with a plug cutter. You can even leave the plugs proud for a decorative look.

I have used these drywall anchors on heavy mirror frame installs, and they are great.

Another option is to scuff the paint with a 60 grit sanding block. Then you should be able to glue it and pin nail it. The nails will hold fast until the glue dries. Construction adhesive usually works fine, but is only as strong as the paint it’s attached to.

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

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LiveEdge

486 posts in 1087 days


#3 posted 02-01-2016 06:51 PM

I like the second option better than the first and might go with that. Like I said, because the holes will be asymmetricfrom left to right I don’t like the idea of plugs or filler. It will be too obvious. The wood actually doesn’t need too much strength to be there (as apparently it was just hanging there by itself for a while). I like the pin nail idea. Perhaps a few nails to hold down the bow while the adhesive sets.

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onoitsmatt

227 posts in 643 days


#4 posted 02-01-2016 07:00 PM

A friend had tile surrounding their fireplace and the adhesive failed on a few of the tiles. I suspected it may have been related to the heat generated by having a fire in the fireplace. Is the adhesive you are using going to get gummy/loose when heated? Just a thought. You might try heating up the adhesive on the back of the mantel and just see if it gets tacky again, indicating it could fail due to the heat.

-- Matt - Phoenix, AZ

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tomsteve

394 posts in 686 days


#5 posted 02-01-2016 07:04 PM

construction adhesive is to be used in conjunction with mechanical fasteners.
locate where you can mount it with scews, drill 3/8” counter sinks, then use a plug cutter and cut some plugs from face grain of another piece of juniper and plug em.
i do this often and when the plugs are cut correctly they are almost invisible.
you should only need about 4 screws to hold that in place.

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pintodeluxe

4859 posts in 2280 days


#6 posted 02-01-2016 07:04 PM

FYI the holes could be symmetrical from left to right because they are sheetrock anchors. No studs needed.

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

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dhazelton

2326 posts in 1764 days


#7 posted 02-01-2016 07:14 PM

You must have used two different adhesives because one bead hung tight to the wood and one bead hung tight to the wall – unless your beads weren’t fat enough to contact both surfaces. Plus heat from the gas stove doesn’t help. I would use mechanical fasteners. If that’s just a piece of one by I’d get long finish nails and use a nail set to hide the head. Plus it’s an excuse to buy a new stud finder.

Other option is P 0 screws with a trim head. You’ll barely see them.

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TheTurtleCarpenter

828 posts in 533 days


#8 posted 02-01-2016 07:23 PM

Cut a rectangle of the Sheetrock out less about 2” length x width and put a piece of 1/2” ply in to glue and brad nail to.

-- "Tying shoelaces was way harder than learning to Whistle",,,,,member MWTCA area K. Kentucky

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Snipes

99 posts in 1712 days


#9 posted 02-01-2016 07:31 PM

finish nailer! just like the trim above it

-- if it is to be it is up to me

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Reaperwoodworks

94 posts in 402 days


#10 posted 02-01-2016 07:36 PM

Screw a piece of 1/4” plywood to wall, glue your finish piece to that.

-- Website: www.reaperwoodworks.com, Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC_ognomZyK6V0VwdokBcixw

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LiveEdge

486 posts in 1087 days


#11 posted 02-01-2016 07:51 PM



You must have used two different adhesives because one bead hung tight to the wood and one bead hung tight to the wall – unless your beads weren t fat enough to contact both surfaces. Plus heat from the gas stove doesn t help. I would use mechanical fasteners. If that s just a piece of one by I d get long finish nails and use a nail set to hide the head. Plus it s an excuse to buy a new stud finder.

Other option is P 0 screws with a trim head. You ll barely see them.

- dhazelton


You are noticing the pattern on the wall and the one on the wood. :) The wall pattern is the previous adhesive that belonged to the wood this one replaced. :) I didn’t use enough on my wood because you can see there were plenty of places it did not contact the wall. Nailing it down should help that.

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