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New Table Saw: Blade Alignment Question (wobble?)

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Forum topic by MundiesUndies posted 02-01-2016 01:55 PM 618 views 0 times favorited 10 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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MundiesUndies

3 posts in 309 days


02-01-2016 01:55 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question table saw delta 36-725 alignment tablesaw

Hi All,

Rookie question here:

I bought a Delta 36-725 and have spent some time trying to get it set up. I followed the procedures detailed on this site (http://lumberjocks.com/thetinman/blog/45305) to align the blade to the miter slot and was successful. I was able to align the blade to the miter slot within 0.001”

Despite the saw passing this test, the blade seems to wobble. Measuring the distance from the miter slot to the blade, there’s 0.021” (measured with feeler gauge) difference between the 2 sides of the blade. e.g. Use adjustable contractor’s square to find the tooth that’s closest to the miter slot, then turn the blade 180 degrees. The difference between these is over 20 thousandths.

Am I missing something? Is there something I’m supposed to adjust? Did I get a lemon? If so, how do I proceed?

thanks for sharing your experience,

Brent M


10 replies so far

View hotbyte's profile (online now)

hotbyte

841 posts in 2435 days


#1 posted 02-01-2016 02:23 PM

Look for videos/instructions on checking the arbor runout and blade runout. It could be issues with the blade.

Here is one I found right off searching Google…

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WoodNSawdust

1417 posts in 636 days


#2 posted 02-01-2016 02:37 PM

How does the diameter of the arbor shaft compare to the diameter of the hole in the blade?

-- "I love it when a plan comes together" John "Hannibal" Smith

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HokieKen

1735 posts in 598 days


#3 posted 02-01-2016 02:51 PM

How about on the blade plate (below the teeth)? Do you have the same type of runout there? If so, try a different blade. If the runout’s present in that blade as well, it’s in the arbor. You’ll need to measure it with a dial indicator if that’s the case. You should have less than .0005” runout on the arbor itself. Check woodgears.ca for good info on measuring runout on the arbor and grinding it true if necessary.

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

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johnstoneb

2143 posts in 1632 days


#4 posted 02-01-2016 02:56 PM

Don’t measure to the tooth. If carbide the teeth are welded on and if regular vlade they are set. set could be uneven or teeth not welded on the same. all of which are inherent in all blades.

-- Bruce, Boise, ID

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JBrow

811 posts in 379 days


#5 posted 02-01-2016 04:43 PM

MundiesUndies,

I confess that I am a little confused. My confusion stems from not understanding what changed from the first set of measurements (.001”) and the second set (.021”).

In any event, it seems to me that hotbyte has identified two of the three possible causes. The three possible causes are:

1) Debris trapped between the blade and the arbor washers
2) A slightly bent arbor
3) A saw blade that is not flat

My guess is the problem is in the blade, but that is only a guess. You can get an idea of the cause of the problem without buying anything as follows:

Eliminating #1 as the cause is easy. Remove the saw blade and ensure the arbor washers and both side of the blade are clean, and then re-install the blade. If this was the only cause, then the trunnion can be set so that the difference between the front of saw blade tooth to the mitre slot and back of saw blade tooth to the mitre slot is about 0”.

Eliminating #2 requires first marking a single tooth of the blade. This is the measured from tooth. Secure the blade to the arbor and measure from the marked tooth to the mitre slot at the front of the saw (0 degree measurement). Rotate the marked tooth to top dead center. Loosen the blade from the arbor and rotate the blade back to the front of the table without moving the arbor and secure the blade. This has rotated the arbor about 90 degrees and the blade position has not changed. Again, measure the distance from the marked tooth to the mitre slot. This is the 90 degree measurement. Repeat with the arbor rotated another 90 degrees (180 degree measurement) and yet again to obtain a 270 degree measurement – always making sure only the arbor is rotated and the blade remains in position.

Compare the measurements. The closer these measurements are to one another the less runout of the arbor.

Eliminating # 3 requires keeping the arbor in the same location while the blade is rotated. First mark four teeth on the blade, at 12, 3, 6, and 9 o’clock. Mount the blade to the arbor with the 12 o’clock mark directly over the arbor and at top dead center. Rotate the blade and take measurements at the front of the saw to the mitre slot from the 12 o’clock tooth. Return the 12 o’clock tooth to top dead center, loosen the blade and, without moving the arbor, secure the blade with the 3 o’clock tooth at top dead center. Rotate the 3 o’clock tooth to the front of the saw and measure the distance from the three o’clock tooth to the mitre slot. Return the 3 o’clock tooth to top dead center, and repeat for the 6 and 9 o’clock measurements.

The variation in the measures from # 3 lets you know how much run out is in the blade.

With the measurements from #2 and # 3 you can decide whether to keep, return, repair, or junk the saw and/or keep or replace the blade.

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MadMark

976 posts in 912 days


#6 posted 02-02-2016 12:16 AM

Try with a different blade or an alingment bar.

M

-- Madmark - Madmark2150@yahoo.com Wiretreefarm.com

View MundiesUndies's profile

MundiesUndies

3 posts in 309 days


#7 posted 02-02-2016 02:42 AM

Told you I was a rookie! Turned out there was saw dust between the blade and the Arbor washer. I upgraded the blade and obviously wasn’t careful when I reinstalled. Although that only removed about half the runout. I’m still getting about 0.010 “wobble”. I’ll have to try some of your other suggested methods to identify the remaining error.

Thanks for the replies!

View 716's profile

716

502 posts in 376 days


#8 posted 02-02-2016 06:05 PM

Good job MundiesUndies !
I am glad that you did not start bashing the saw, the manufacturer and everyone who has this saw, as some people do and fix the “problem” by buying a 10 times more expensive Sawstop.
Try one more thing:
Take the belt off or release the belt tension as much as you can and repeat your experiment.
If it is much better now it could be caused by a bit off center pulley both on the motor or the arbor ( due to the bushing key) or just not worn in belt. In either case pretty straightforward to fix.

-- It's nice!

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SirIrb

1239 posts in 690 days


#9 posted 02-02-2016 06:17 PM

You could true up the inner arbor flange washer. I have seen where people take a lathe cutting tool, clamp it in vice grips, clamp the vice grips to the saw top.

wait for it

turn the saw on and slowly lower the arbor and remove the slightest amount of metal via the lathe cutting tool. This method, done well, will give you a dead nuts arbor flange washer.

-- Don't blame me, I voted for no one.

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WhyMe

610 posts in 1020 days


#10 posted 02-02-2016 06:55 PM



Good job MundiesUndies !
I am glad that you did not start bashing the saw, the manufacturer and everyone who has this saw, as some people do and fix the “problem” by buying a 10 times more expensive Sawstop.
Try one more thing:
Take the belt off or release the belt tension as much as you can and repeat your experiment.
If it is much better now it could be caused by a bit off center pulley both on the motor or the arbor ( due to the bushing key) or just not worn in belt. In either case pretty straightforward to fix.

- 716

The belt is internal and is not practical to remove.

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