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Will stainless steel bolts rust & seize up?

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Forum topic by WoodNSawdust posted 01-31-2016 06:50 AM 784 views 0 times favorited 16 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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WoodNSawdust

1417 posts in 641 days


01-31-2016 06:50 AM

Topic tags/keywords: stainless steel bolts rust

Today got up into the 60s so I decided to start with an outdoor project – replacing the broken wood handle on my wheel barrow.

For the last few weeks I have regularly sprayed the nuts with WD-40 hoping that they will become loose. They did not.

So my question is will stainless steel bolts and nuts rust and seize up over a period of years when left outside?

Thanks in advance,

-- "I love it when a plan comes together" John "Hannibal" Smith


16 replies so far

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JKMDETAIL

172 posts in 1120 days


#1 posted 01-31-2016 11:56 AM

If they are a higher grade of stainless then no. If they are magnetic they have a potential to rust. Not nearly to the extent of other materials. If they have magnetic qualities they have a small amount of iron in them which will rust.

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WoodNSawdust

1417 posts in 641 days


#2 posted 01-31-2016 12:33 PM

It would seem obvious that it is the rust that is causing the bolt and nut to seize?

-- "I love it when a plan comes together" John "Hannibal" Smith

View tomsteve's profile

tomsteve

394 posts in 684 days


#3 posted 01-31-2016 02:22 PM

since the handles broken and getting replaced, put a propane torch on the nut for a bit(a minute or 2). usually doesnt take too much heat to break it loose.

View TheFridge's profile

TheFridge

5765 posts in 950 days


#4 posted 01-31-2016 02:30 PM

No. If they’re over tightened the threads will booger up and you have to cut or break them.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

View dhazelton's profile

dhazelton

2325 posts in 1761 days


#5 posted 01-31-2016 02:36 PM

Use a grinder to cut them off.

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shipwright

7172 posts in 2262 days


#6 posted 01-31-2016 02:53 PM

Stainless steel is about 75-80% iron but is protected from corrosion by the inclusion of alloying elements, primarily chromium. That said it is suceptable to two specific kinds of corrosion, crevice corrosion and pitting. In both cases it will corrode freely, even marine grades.

New SS corrdes on its surface immediately forming a thin “passivated” film that protects it from further corrosion.This film can be damaged mechanically (like tightening a nut on a bolt) and if the new surface doesn’t have access to the atmosphere to re-passivate it will corrode just like any other steel. This happens on underwater boat fittings all the time.
The good news is that your shovel won’t likely be in seawater so you will be fine with most SS grades, certainly better than plain steel.

-- Paul M ..............If God wanted us to have fiberglass boats he would have given us fibreglass trees. http://thecanadianschooloffrenchmarquetry.com/

View Bluepine38's profile

Bluepine38

3341 posts in 2550 days


#7 posted 01-31-2016 05:51 PM

Stainless steel will have a greater tendency to gall, or sieze up because of friction between the bolt and the
nut, than to sieze up due to rust and corrosion in the open air. If the area you are in has a corrosive
atmosphere, you could use T316 stainless bolts instead of the normal 18-8 grade which is usually what is
available. One of the mills used to use regular plated nuts on the stainless bolts because of the galling issue
with stainless.

-- As ever, Gus-the 77 yr young apprentice carpenter

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USAwoodArt

243 posts in 407 days


#8 posted 01-31-2016 06:20 PM

Another option is to use bronze bolts and nuts..

-- Wood for projects is like a good Fart..."better when you cut it yourself"

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WoodNSawdust

1417 posts in 641 days


#9 posted 01-31-2016 09:40 PM



Use a grinder to cut them off.

- dhazelton


That is what I did. I was hoping that I could find a type of bolt that would not seize up when the handle has to be replaced again in 5 – 10 years.

Since it did not sound like stainless would satisfy my requirements and the cost differential I went with simple bolts and will cut them off again when needed.

-- "I love it when a plan comes together" John "Hannibal" Smith

View splatman's profile

splatman

561 posts in 863 days


#10 posted 01-31-2016 11:01 PM

Would putting anti-seize compound on the threads prevent galling?

View dhazelton's profile

dhazelton

2325 posts in 1761 days


#11 posted 02-01-2016 12:17 AM

Goober a bunch of silicone on them if you want.

View TheFridge's profile

TheFridge

5765 posts in 950 days


#12 posted 02-01-2016 12:21 AM



Would putting anti-seize compound on the threads prevent galling?

- splatman

Yep

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

View ThomasChippendale's profile

ThomasChippendale

244 posts in 397 days


#13 posted 02-01-2016 01:05 AM

Anti-Seize is the answer, for SS zinc based instead of copper based but its harder to find.

-- PJ

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WoodNSawdust

1417 posts in 641 days


#14 posted 02-01-2016 01:23 AM

Are there different types of Anti-Seize compounds? I have one for high heat automotive applications.

-- "I love it when a plan comes together" John "Hannibal" Smith

View bandit571's profile (online now)

bandit571

14592 posts in 2148 days


#15 posted 02-01-2016 01:28 AM

Maybe a wrap or two of Teflon tape on the bolt?

-- A Planer? I'M the planer, this is what I use

showing 1 through 15 of 16 replies

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