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Forum topic by OldGuysRule posted 01-30-2016 10:54 AM 838 views 0 times favorited 16 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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OldGuysRule

130 posts in 439 days


01-30-2016 10:54 AM

Topic tags/keywords: question router tablesaw

Where I work they tore out all the old outdated cubicles and put in new up to date crap. But, anyway I was able to rescue two pieces from the trash bin thinking they would be perfect to replace one of the wings on my TS and build a router table out of it. Well, when I got them home and laid one of them up there darned if it doesn’t come up 3” short, or narrow if you will. Take a look please.
These are really great pieces made out of MDF a inch and a half thick. Would make a great router table top. Just a little on the narrow side.


A real nice bull nose front on it. My first thought is to use 1 1/2” angle iron and then add a couple of pieces of steel across to affix the top to, which would leave the 1 1/2” gap on both sides. Which really wouldn’t be that bad. They would make good catch all trays! I could use them as a place to lay my steel rule and other like items.

But, I’m very open to suggestions of another way to use these panels. They are both they same size and I would like to make a router table on the wing of my TS. Put your thinking caps on LJer’s and come up with something good.

Thanks!!!!!

-- Rod P.........OLD GUY......Learning new things!


16 replies so far

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JBrow

819 posts in 386 days


#1 posted 01-30-2016 05:49 PM

OldGuysRule,

My first thought is to widen the panel to the size you need and forego the angle iron. Then you can mount the panel to the table saw and use it also as a router table – as you were originally planning.

Rip the panel to expose a raw edge of MDF. Then glue wood to the MDF edge, paying close attention to the top surface, which needs to be flush with the surface of the panel. Then flush up the wood to MDF glue joint with a scraper or sand paper. Wood could be glued to one edge to make up the 3” gap, or to opposite edges to make up 1-1/2” gaps on each edge.

Rip an edge off the other panel and use it to make your router table fence.

View bkseitz's profile

bkseitz

294 posts in 776 days


#2 posted 01-30-2016 06:00 PM

Got basically the same Craftsman TS. Here’s what I built it into over the years

-- bkseitz, Washington "if everything is going well, you've obviously overlooked something"

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OldGuysRule

130 posts in 439 days


#3 posted 01-31-2016 07:34 AM

Thanks JBrow! Some really good suggestions for me to contemplate on.

bkseitz Nice set up. I wish I had the room for side extensions that big!!!!! Must really be nice when your cutting sheet goods!

-- Rod P.........OLD GUY......Learning new things!

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bkseitz

294 posts in 776 days


#4 posted 01-31-2016 04:49 PM

@OldGuysRule, Been really happy with how table saw and outfeed table has come out. Build it with sheet goods specifically in mind. The white wing was cut from a 4’x4’ sheet of melamine with oak trim, the outfeed table is a full 4’x8’ sheet with oak trim and a cabinet made from 3/4 oak ply.

Most of the projects I’ve been doing are using 3/4 Oak ply or something similar. I’ve a rack of the stuff in another corner from HD waiting to use on shop remodel (router and downdraft cabinets), free standing closets for house, and other projects.

—still need to complete these though; doors and drawers for accessories. Oh well more projects stacking up.

-- bkseitz, Washington "if everything is going well, you've obviously overlooked something"

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MadMark

978 posts in 919 days


#5 posted 01-31-2016 05:10 PM

Turn it 90° …

M

-- Madmark - Madmark2150@yahoo.com Wiretreefarm.com

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JBrow

819 posts in 386 days


#6 posted 02-01-2016 01:38 AM

OldGuysRule,

Thinking about your problem a little more brought to mind another idea. Rather than permanently outfitting the table saw with an extension, perhaps a mobile support(s) could be built.

The mobile support could be a shop built plywood box with shelves and doors, mounted on locking casters and sized to slip between the front and back rails of the table saw with a finished height at or slightly below table saw height. The cubical panel would be the top. Since it is mobile and independent of the table saw, you can use it for other purposes around the shop.

Using the second cubic part, a second mobile workstation could be built, similar to the design just outlined. However, this mobile cabinet could serve as an outfeed support table for the table saw.

Either of these mobile workstations could be modified as a router table. In fact this is the design of my router table, which is parked as an outfeed support for the table saw when I am not using it as a router table. In addition to a router table, I use mine for storage, a portable work table, and outfeed support for the table saw.

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bkseitz

294 posts in 776 days


#7 posted 02-01-2016 05:13 AM

OldGuysRule, good suggestion. Before I started upgrading my saw I had the contractor saw on a movable base (added to standard base—still have that taking up space someplace till I can sell it off on Craig’s List. I used a combination of saw horses (not too great), then some of those roller supports (worked ok, but occasionally tipped over, which is why I went the route I did).

-- bkseitz, Washington "if everything is going well, you've obviously overlooked something"

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OldGuysRule

130 posts in 439 days


#8 posted 02-04-2016 09:40 AM

JBrow, darn good idea!!! I’ll have to study on that for awhile! My biggest problem with mobile roll around stuff is the floor in the shop is very uneven! Highs and lows. If I built it to roll into place I’d have to level it somehow every time. But, I do love the idea!!!!!

I’ve got the floor marked where the TS sits so that if I ever have to move it, like to work on the old car or something, I can put it right back in the same spot.

-- Rod P.........OLD GUY......Learning new things!

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OldGuysRule

130 posts in 439 days


#9 posted 02-04-2016 09:43 AM

bkseitz, I’ll flip you for your shop! Man I wish I had that kind of room!!!!!!

But, then I’m lucky to have a shop. There are guys on here working out of a closet or spare bedroom. I’m very thankful for the shop I do have!

-- Rod P.........OLD GUY......Learning new things!

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JBrow

819 posts in 386 days


#10 posted 02-04-2016 03:25 PM

OldGuysRule,

Not knowing just how uneven your shop floor is, I am not sure this info will be of much help. About a year ago I installed a floating floor on a concrete slab. It had to be flat +/- 1/16”. My solution to flatten the floor was to use an embossing compound I bought at the home center.

Embossing compound can be built up to ¼” and feathered to 0” without cracking (according to the manufacturer). It mixes like and has the consistency of cement, with an open time of 5 minutes. I mixed the dried powder with acrylic additive to keep the compound from cracking. It comes in a 5 lb. bag and sets up quickly.

I applied the embossing compound and leveled it with a length of MDF with a straight edge as a screed. I did the whole floor, but in your case that may not be necessary. You only need level where the support tables legs would set around the table saw.

Alternatively, you could use self-leveling compound and pour the thinnest lift recommended by the product but limited to the area where the table saw and the stock support table(s) would set. Self-leveling compound is also sold at home centers and is used by contractors to level floors before applying ceramic tile or wood flooring. There are probably YouTube videos showing how this is done.

Perhaps self-leveling compound could be used in your case by pouring the compound in a form to create a dead level surface on which the table saw and the support table(s) would set. Then use embossing compound to create a ramp from the floor to the just poured level area. Large diameter caster would make rolling the tables into place easier.

I think both products go over wood or concrete. Concrete would have to be clean.

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bkseitz

294 posts in 776 days


#11 posted 02-04-2016 04:35 PM

OldGuysRule, the floor on my shop is not exactly flat and level. It was an RV barn before, so the concrete was a rough job from what I could see. However, I used “4 caster lock wheels which makes my saw cabinet mobile; though I’ve only moved it when I’ve been reorganizing the shop workflow.

Pushing the TS around the shop is fairly easy with big wheels 3plus. I’ve even pushed it with little problem out of the shop onto and off of a cement pad just in front of shop (~1” drop). Had known about larger casters I would have gone with the “5 ones they sell also.

-- bkseitz, Washington "if everything is going well, you've obviously overlooked something"

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bkseitz

294 posts in 776 days


#12 posted 02-04-2016 05:07 PM

@OldGuysRule, My shop, mixed blessing right now and I’ve hardly have the time or space to work on anything. This past and this year has been different. Wife and I decided to do a massive declutter and cleanup around the property.

Lots of potential space I’ve been reclaiming as a shop, but more than half of it is an junk collection point or a parking lot for equipment that doesn’t work. I’ve a bobcat skip-loader with a backhoe attachment (my wife bought thinking it would help around the property) dead in the middle of the shop which blocks almost everything. Originally I had to move a lot of stuff just to use the contractor table saw without tripping over stuff. Working on cars meant rolling the tool boxes to the front of the barn door and working on these on the gravel.

Since its a steel barn, till I’m finished insulating, it is an icebox in the winter and an oven in the summer. I’ve (4) infrared heaters over the most used work areas and two propane barn heaters to warm up the place in general. Typically in the winter it takes about 2 hours to get the place from a bone numbing 35 to a chilly 60. The metal sides leach heat like you won’t believe.

I know I sound kind of whiney, but I do appreciate the face that I’ve a lot of potential space. Actually a real lot for just a hobby shop; well not exactly a hobby shop. I’ve become a captive vendor for my wife’s projects ;-) But over the years its been getting more useful and safer which each iteration which is making it more blessing. This coming summer we’ll be having a massive yard sale to get ride of stuff (skis, sleds, surfboards, clothing carts my wife picked up at a JC Penny’s that went out of business (that’s a 10’x10’ space all by itself), etc. And we’ll build garden and potting sheds for her to store supplies/tools and work on her gardening projects instead of dumping lawn equipment in the barn.

If you’re ever out my way PacNW, drop by the shop. The coffee is always on :-)

-- bkseitz, Washington "if everything is going well, you've obviously overlooked something"

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OldGuysRule

130 posts in 439 days


#13 posted 02-06-2016 04:01 AM

BK it sounds like your full to the brim! I guess I should have said I wish I had your potential space! LOL My shop is half round, you know like the old army Quonset huts. The shape drives me nuts!!!!! The walls curve to the point you lose a lot of floor space. Now the good thing about the walls, they help hold in the heat! I have been using one small infrared heater and if I want it will heat it up to over 80 degrees in there and hold it without using much gas. That part I love!!!

I’d like sitting down for a cup of coffee with you but, since I quit driving and started working in the office I don’t get out of Arkansas very often. My wife ”The Crazy Cat Lady” has a hard time getting me to go anywhere! I don’t even want to go to town unless there is a trip to Lowe’s or Home Depot in it for me. She will ask me to go somewhere with her and I’ll start whining about it and she’ll say we can go to Lowe’s too. Then I’ll give in and go. If there is wood, metal or tools involved in the trip to town I’m there!!!! I have been thinking about a trip to Springfield, Mo. to go to the Grizzly Tool showroom. Don’t need anything right now but just to look around. It’s only about 100 miles. So just a quick trip to do some tool envy drooling!

If you make it to Arkansas there is coffee here also!

-- Rod P.........OLD GUY......Learning new things!

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bkseitz

294 posts in 776 days


#14 posted 02-06-2016 07:05 AM

OldGuysRule, yup but “its getting better all the time”. Quonset huts, my steel barn is not to far from that expect its rectangular. Haven’t been to Arkansas for ages. Just came back from nieces wedding a couple of months ago in Texas (greater Austin area). Trips out from home. I understand. Been a road warrior for ages and the last several years I’ve managed to have a stay local and at time at home. Now I travel to a big conference in Phx once a year to speak and to family functions. I will go to Home Depot, Lowes, Woodcraft and Rocklers—all 45 minutes or more. Grizzly is ~3 hours North of me. The bummer is this year there are no woodworking shows on the West Coast.

Coffee in Arkansas, if I make it out there some time I’ll surely take you up on that.

-- bkseitz, Washington "if everything is going well, you've obviously overlooked something"

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OldGuysRule

130 posts in 439 days


#15 posted 02-06-2016 08:20 AM

JBrow

I’ve given some thought to trying to level the floor in the past but, just don’t want the hassle it would be. The floor is soaked with grease and oil. At one time this shop was my dad’s and he did mostly mechanical work in there. Couldn’t tell you how many old engines were rebuilt in there! Getting the floor clean enough to use a leveler agent would be next to impossible!! It would have to be ground down and if I was going to grind it, I could level it by grinding. Also more trouble then it’s worth.

I’m leaning to my original idea of using inch and a half angle iron to mount the desk top and go from there. If you think about it having the inch and a half on each side would be handy. A place to lay the rule and a pencil. And it would catch a lot of the dust to make easy clean up with the vac. Of course I’ll build in a vacuum port on the router to suck most of the dust but they never get it all. The metal would make a good base for mounting a router lift also. But, thanks for all the good idea’s!!!!! That is why I posted this to begin with IDEA’S. I love being able to pick the brains of others. I’m going to pick BK’s brain as much as I can for the down draft air system he mentioned.

You hear that BK? Get ready to have someone rummaging around inside you brain!!!!!

-- Rod P.........OLD GUY......Learning new things!

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