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Forum topic by Will Merrit posted 01-30-2016 02:54 AM 1658 views 1 time favorited 40 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Will Merrit

52 posts in 357 days


01-30-2016 02:54 AM

Topic tags/keywords: bandsaw rockwell

Well I scored this at a auction for $180.00. Fixing to start cleaning up and tuning in. Any one have any special reccomendactions on what I should do to her while she is torn down? Anyone ever built their own riser block? Welp I appreciate all the help I can get…here goes


40 replies so far

View conifur's profile

conifur

955 posts in 615 days


#1 posted 01-30-2016 03:12 AM

Nice!!! I am not a metal man, but to make a riser block out of wood I dont think it could handle the tension. I have read here, I think the Grizzly will work, but let some one confirm that.

-- Knowledge and experience equals Wisdom, Michael Frankowski

View runswithscissors's profile

runswithscissors

2189 posts in 1489 days


#2 posted 01-30-2016 04:36 AM

I fortunately live near both an aluminum smelter and a metal recylcler, so I can get big blocks of AL by the pound. I actually have such a block if I ever need to raise mine a couple of inches (18” saw with only 10” over the table), and I figure it will work well for that.

-- I admit to being an adrenaline junky; fortunately, I'm very easily frightened

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

4225 posts in 1663 days


#3 posted 01-30-2016 05:02 AM

Welp I appreciate all the help I can get…

Start by tearing it apart, then clean and paint:

Get some new bearings, belts, tires and a good blade, and then put it back together agian so it looks all purdy :)
After that, tune it up and start making sawdust.

Here is the obligatory band saw tune up video:
Band Saw Clinic with Alex Snodgrass

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

View Will Merrit's profile

Will Merrit

52 posts in 357 days


#4 posted 01-30-2016 07:29 AM

Brad,

I have seen that picture before and whoever did that really set the bar high. I got a littlemail bit done this evening. I took it off the base trashed the belt and tires and started taking apart and cleaning. I am amazed at how many parts there are but even more impressed with how many cast parts there are! I hit the whole saw with a wire wheel brush and that took care of surface rust and chipped paint. On to the stand tomorrow I reckon. I do have a few questions though.

1. I couldn’t figure out how to remove the lower wheel. Do you have to use a puller?

2. Would I be ostracized and kicked off of here if I painted over all the previously painted surfaceS with back bed liner paint?

4. Dear Lord I can put this all back together! Any good resources you know on these saws would help a lot.

Night

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

4225 posts in 1663 days


#5 posted 01-30-2016 07:51 AM

1. I couldn’t figure out how to remove the lower wheel. Do you have to use a puller?
2. Would I be ostracized and kicked off of here if I painted over all the previously painted surfaceS with back bed liner paint?
4. Dear Lord I can put this all back together! Any good resources you know on these saws would help a lot.
- Will Merrit

What happened to #3?? [insert evil-grin here]

1) No. Take off the nut and it comes right off. There is a key in there and sometimes the wheel can be a little stubborn, but some gentle force and maybe a couple taps with a rubber mallet in strategic locations should get it off. Just go easy on it as you don’t want to bend or break anything.

2) Nope – It’s your saw… paint it however you want (but please don’t make it pink!)

4) The parts diagram in the manual is your best guide. And take lots of pictures along the way so you can go back and check how things went if you get stuck. There aren’t really that many parts involved… at least not compared to some machines, and it’s pretty simple to figure out.

Cheers,
Brad

PS: It’s my saw in that picture :-)

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

View SirIrb's profile

SirIrb

1239 posts in 694 days


#6 posted 01-30-2016 07:54 AM

PICTURES PICTURES PICTURES!!! You have to take pictures as you tear it down.


Brad, I have seen that picture before and whoever did that really set the bar high. I got a littlemail bit done this evening. I took it off the base trashed the belt and tires and started taking apart and cleaning. I am amazed at how many parts there are but even more impressed with how many cast parts there are! I hit the whole saw with a wire wheel brush and that took care of surface rust and chipped paint. On to the stand tomorrow I reckon. I do have a few questions though.

1. I couldn t figure out how to remove the lower wheel. Do you have to use a puller?

2. Would I be ostracized and kicked off of here if I painted over all the previously painted surfaceS with back bed liner paint?

4. Dear Lord I can put this all back together! Any good resources you know on these saws would help a lot.

Night

- Will Merrit


-- Don't blame me, I voted for no one.

View onoitsmatt's profile

onoitsmatt

227 posts in 640 days


#7 posted 01-30-2016 02:32 PM

Hi Will. Cool saw. I blogged a pretty full restoration of my 1950s Delta Band Saw here:

http://lumberjocks.com/onoitsmatt/blog/64834

This is part 1 of 6. Each part tackles a different set of components.

I couldn’t find a one-stop resource for a beginner like me that fielded all the dumb questions I had. So I learned and blogged and learned some more.

It is a great way to learn about the machine.

I have more photos if you need to see how something fits together. I tried to include pretty comprehensive photos of each component in the blog. Just PM or ask here.

-- Matt - Phoenix, AZ

View Will Merrit's profile

Will Merrit

52 posts in 357 days


#8 posted 01-30-2016 02:51 PM

Matt

Thanks a million. I will be using this!

View Will Merrit's profile

Will Merrit

52 posts in 357 days


#9 posted 01-31-2016 04:32 AM

Matt and Brad
I have a issue. I have taken the lower pull your and nut off. I have also take off the nut off off the wheel side but I cannot get the wheel off of the shafts. I accidently tried to drive the woodruff key inwards toward the body, and now I cannot remove the wheel from the shaft. I have put a puller on there with no success I cannot figure it outo. The bearing seems good here is the question

1. Leave it be and run with the old bearing or .

2. Keep working till I get two wheels off?

3. Does the key come out on the lower wheel assemby before you can pull the tite?

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

4225 posts in 1663 days


#10 posted 01-31-2016 04:42 AM

No on 1, yes on 2.

Once you take the nut off the wheel side, the wheel comes off. Not always easily though :) Usually a little cleaning up, some penetrating oil and gentle persuasion is all that is needed. As an alternative, you can remove the lower drive shaft with the wheel still in place. Tap the shaft out from the rear towards the front. Make sure you have removed the pulley, key and nut on the back first. Not sure what you are asking about in #3, but AFAIK, the key can’t be removed before taking off the wheel.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

View Will Merrit's profile

Will Merrit

52 posts in 357 days


#11 posted 01-31-2016 12:30 PM

I have tried it all and the blasted tire won’t come off. I even put a puller on it but gave up because I am scared it will bend the tire. I think I messed up without thinking I drove the key holding the tire on further in towards the bearing. My only option at the point is to cut the bearing off and drive the key back out. Thoughts?

View onoitsmatt's profile

onoitsmatt

227 posts in 640 days


#12 posted 01-31-2016 02:00 PM

Ditto to what Brad said. I don’t think the key is a problem. It is a semicircle, rounded on the bottom. It won’t cause the wheel to get stuck. Gear puller should work if you have removed the nut. Or tapping the shaft may help. You may want to disassemble the pulley side first or do the top wheel to get more familiar.

-- Matt - Phoenix, AZ

View TheWoodRaccoon's profile

TheWoodRaccoon

364 posts in 393 days


#13 posted 01-31-2016 02:08 PM


I have tried it all and the blasted tire won t come off. I even put a puller on it but gave up because I am scared it will bend the tire. I think I messed up without thinking I drove the key holding the tire on further in towards the bearing. My only option at the point is to cut the bearing off and drive the key back out. Thoughts?

- Will Merrit

Just keep in mind, the “tire” is the rubber or urethane strip that covers the outer circumference of the wheel. What you’re referring to is the “wheel”, just clearing up any confusion.

As for the your issue:

On the bottom wheel, there are bearings that are encased by the lower half of the cast iron frame, and there is a shaft that protrudes from both sides. One side has the wheel on it, the other has a pulley. If the “wheel” is still on the shaft, how do you plan on cutting the bearing off? The bearings are behind the wheel, not in the wheel like on the top wheel. Do you mean the shaft? DO NOT cut the shaft, or anything for that matter…..Just keep hitting it with WD-40. If not, gently heat the wheel itself with a propane torch and a circular motion around the hub close the shaft, and use the puller. That should work. Just keep at it, however long it takes, and it will eventually come off.

-- still trying to think of a clever signature......

View TheWoodRaccoon's profile

TheWoodRaccoon

364 posts in 393 days


#14 posted 01-31-2016 02:13 PM

Post some pictures of what you are doing and how you are doing it, it might help us help you!

-- still trying to think of a clever signature......

View TheWoodRaccoon's profile

TheWoodRaccoon

364 posts in 393 days


#15 posted 01-31-2016 02:16 PM

Ill go down to my bandsaw and do a little demontration video to help you out, ill post it ASAP!

-- still trying to think of a clever signature......

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