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Forum topic by AWood posted 01-29-2016 06:19 PM 873 views 0 times favorited 22 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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AWood

49 posts in 3211 days


01-29-2016 06:19 PM

I bought a 2 hp General International Dust Collector and I want to hook up a remote control on/off system. I checked out Amazon and they have a few remote control plugs. A couple in particular shows heavy duty applications. I not that “up”on ratings electrical stuff. Is there anyone using these remote control power plug attachments on such an electronic motor and if not has anyone used an alternative remote control system for controlling motor on dust collection system.

-- AllWood


22 replies so far

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

3942 posts in 1958 days


#1 posted 01-29-2016 06:38 PM

I would think a true 2 HP motor would be 240V. Anyway, check the motor plate for the amp draw…the switch will have to be able to handle that load (and voltage). It’s likely you won’t find one that’s rated for it…though a lot of guys have some they use on the HF “2” HP collector and seems to get by. I’d consider either buying one made for a DC (like a Long Ranger) or making your own with a contactor, some wire/plugs, and any old cheap lamp remote. With a setup like this, the contactor has a coil that switches the DC on/off, that coil is switched by the lamp remote. You can probably build one for $30 or so.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

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716

502 posts in 381 days


#2 posted 01-30-2016 12:09 AM


I would think a true 2 HP motor would be 240V.
- Fred Hargis

Why ? There is plenty of 115V 2HP motors:

-- It's nice!

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hotbyte

842 posts in 2440 days


#3 posted 01-30-2016 12:40 AM

This is only 2HP listed on website and it doesn’t show anything less than 220v as option…

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firefighterontheside

13487 posts in 1321 days


#4 posted 01-30-2016 12:53 AM

I’m using the long ranger for my harbor freight that says its 2hp. It’s working great. It’s in another room with a glass door in between and it reaches. It was recommended by another LJ. It is 120V.

-- Bill M. "People change, walnut doesn't" by Gene.

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Paul

721 posts in 1030 days


#5 posted 01-30-2016 01:05 AM


I would think a true 2 HP motor would be 240V.
- Fred Hargis

Why ? There is plenty of 115V 2HP motors:

- 716

A true 2hp motor can’t be run on 110v.

Paul

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MrUnix

4230 posts in 1664 days


#6 posted 01-30-2016 01:46 AM

A true 2hp motor can’t be run on 110v.
- Paul

Why not?

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

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runswithscissors

2189 posts in 1490 days


#7 posted 01-30-2016 04:50 AM

Most 240 volt motors that claim 2 hp draw 10 to 12 amps. I’m not sure what hp is available from 15 amps at 120v, but I have seen 120v motors (old timers, of course) that were pulling 24 amps. Obviously that would need a 30 amp circuit, and some seriously heavy duty wire.

I have Grizzly’s 240v remote for my DC, and it works very well. Don’t remember what it cost, though.

-- I admit to being an adrenaline junky; fortunately, I'm very easily frightened

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TopamaxSurvivor

17671 posts in 3141 days


#8 posted 01-30-2016 05:15 AM

A true 2 hp 120 volt motor would take at least a 30 amp circuit.

The original question about ratings. Motor switches are supposed to be rated by HP and voltage. In the real world, most the the switches you will find in the reatail market will be by amps and voltage.

-- Bob in WW ~ "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

3942 posts in 1958 days


#9 posted 01-30-2016 12:29 PM


A true 2 hp 120 volt motor would take at least a 30 amp circuit.

The original question about ratings. Motor switches are supposed to be rated by HP and voltage. In the real world, most the the switches you will find in the reatail market will be by amps and voltage.

- TopamaxSurvivor

What he (and some others) said^^^^^^^^^!

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View JeffP's profile

JeffP

573 posts in 856 days


#10 posted 01-30-2016 01:02 PM

Average Power (in watts) = amps * volts(RMS)

In the US, there are domestically available UL rated 20 amp outlets for 120V connection.

Max power from such an outlet would be 20 X 120 = 2400 watts.

2400 watts equal 3.217 Horsepower.

For the more commonly seen 15A outlets, the max calculated HP would be: 2.413 Horsepower

That said, the actual current used by a DC would be dependent on the airflow as discussed in another recent thread. At the end of the day, “2 HP” is what engineers call a “marketing number”. It has very little connection to reality. If the same company makes two models of DC, and one is a “1.5 HP” and the other is a “2 HP”, there is a good chance the bigger one will use more juice than the smaller one with the same ducting setup. That’s about all those numbers mean.

Nowadays a clamp-on current meter can be had pretty cheap. You could just measure your DC with your ducting system in place and see what it’s typical current draw is, and then choose a switch accordingly…or you could pay for a super expensive one…or you could just “wing it”.

The right choice for you has more to do with your own personal temperament than with the “marketing numbers”.

-- Last week I finally got my $*i# together. Unfortunately, it was in my shop, so I will probably never find it again.

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

17671 posts in 3141 days


#11 posted 01-31-2016 12:28 AM

Sorry, but there are too many erroneous assumptions in that calculation. 2400 watts equal 3.217 Horsepower #1- everything motor related requires 125% full load amps. #2- those watts to HP calcs are based on DC (direct current not dust collector;-) ). 746 watts per HP does not apply to AC motors. The code requires 16 amps used for sizing 1 HP at 120 v.

The only way to really tell what size the motor is is to look at the name plate. As has been stated, manufacturer’s using locked rotor current to calculate HP means nothing; it is BS propaganda! ;-( I my experience, a 1 hp at 120 volts will be slightly less than the code 16 amps. 16 amps is a generic number that will cover any motor of that hp rating. The code allows for actual nameplate full amps to be used if available.

-- Bob in WW ~ "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

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TheFridge

5765 posts in 951 days


#12 posted 01-31-2016 12:46 AM

Motor startup amperage is taken into account on motor rated switches and devices.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

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WhyMe

614 posts in 1026 days


#13 posted 01-31-2016 02:31 AM


746 watts per HP does not apply to AC motors.

- TopamaxSurvivor

Since when?

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

4230 posts in 1664 days


#14 posted 01-31-2016 03:12 AM

Wow.

From the Engineeiringtoolbox web site:

Electrical Motors - Hp and Amps
Electrical Motor - Full Load Current
Electric Motor Online Calculator
Electrical Motor Efficiency

Note: In all the above, 1 hp = 745.7 W, rounded to 746

AC or DC, it’s still the same:
For DC: HP = ( I x E x Eff ) / 746
For single phase AC: HP = ( I x E x Eff x PF ) / 746
For three phase AC: HP = ( I x E x Eff x 1.73 x PF ) / 746

I = Amps, E = Volts, Eff = Efficiency and PF = power factor

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

View bbain32's profile

bbain32

21 posts in 640 days


#15 posted 01-31-2016 03:46 AM

AWood, since you are a fellow canuck, check out these remotes at Busy Bee.

240V: http://www.busybeetools.com/products/switch-remote-d-collector-220v.html

120V: http://www.busybeetools.com/products/switch-remote-d-collectors110v-15amp.html

Just figure out if you need 120 or 240. (the current offerings from General International rated 2HP are 240V I don’t know about older models)

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