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Shooting board question

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Forum topic by bbasiaga posted 01-29-2016 01:34 PM 638 views 0 times favorited 10 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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bbasiaga

757 posts in 1460 days


01-29-2016 01:34 PM

Relatively new to hand planes. So far I have only really used them for spot fixes and some smoothing work. I was thinking of building a shooting board, but I have a question about how they work.

I see most are constructed of a base layer, then a support platform for the piece to be planed. The plane rides along the base layer, and against the support platform which is also acting as a straight edge/guide. From surfing around Youtube, etc., it seems like the platform is usually say 1/2” thick or so. But most planes don’t have 1/2” on either side of the mouth. So how are you not just constantly planing away the support platform?

-Brian

-- Part of engineering is to know when to put your calculator down and pick up your tools.


10 replies so far

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hotbyte

842 posts in 2440 days


#1 posted 01-29-2016 01:37 PM

I had similar question a while back. The edge of plane mouth leaves a small lip on support platform…basically, plane makes a small rabbet on platform.

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hotbyte

842 posts in 2440 days


#2 posted 01-29-2016 01:45 PM

Here’s image showing it…

Link

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bbasiaga

757 posts in 1460 days


#3 posted 01-29-2016 02:45 PM

Man, I feel like I should have been able to figure that out….lol.

That picture was worth a thousand words for sure.

Thanks,
Brian

-- Part of engineering is to know when to put your calculator down and pick up your tools.

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JayT

4783 posts in 1676 days


#4 posted 01-29-2016 02:47 PM

Here is a good graphic from an article on Derek Cohen’s website.

The other thing to keep in mind is that the shooting plane is riding on and referencing off of the side, not the sole any more. That little lip now becomes just a stop and you have to be conscious of not tipping the plane into the cut. The side and sole on a plane used for shooting need to be exactly perpendicular because of this.

Edit: Nevermind, I see you’ve got it. Oh well, maybe it’ll help someone else with the same question that clicks on this thread.

Don’t feel too bad, Brian. That question comes up quite a bit in regards to shooting boards.

-- "Good judgement is the result of experience. A lot of experience is the result of poor judgement."

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Bill White

4456 posts in 3425 days


#5 posted 01-29-2016 02:58 PM

Cheeks and sole don’t have to be exactly 90 degrees. The iron lateral adjuster can compensate for irregularity.
Bill

-- bill@magraphics.us

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paratrooper34

892 posts in 2416 days


#6 posted 01-29-2016 09:40 PM


The side and sole on a plane used for shooting need to be exactly perpendicular because of this.

- JayT

No, they do not. The only relationship to square is between the blade and the piece being cut. Use lateral adjuster or if you have a wood bodied plane, tap iron to be straight to the piece.

-- Mike

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JayT

4783 posts in 1676 days


#7 posted 01-29-2016 10:05 PM

I understand and agree that you can use the lateral adjuster to get a square cut. That’s not what I was saying above, read the statement again. What I am saying is that you want the perpendicular relationship to help prevent tipping the plane into the cut. Just makes it easier to keep the plane body straight up and down and consistent when shooting.

-- "Good judgement is the result of experience. A lot of experience is the result of poor judgement."

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paratrooper34

892 posts in 2416 days


#8 posted 01-30-2016 12:40 PM



I understand and agree that you can use the lateral adjuster to get a square cut. That s not what I was saying above, read the statement again. What I am saying is that you want the perpendicular relationship to help prevent tipping the plane into the cut. Just makes it easier to keep the plane body straight up and down and consistent when shooting.

- JayT

I read very well, thanks. You stated “The side and sole on a plane used for shooting need to be exactly perpendicular because of this.” And I said that is not true. I have LN shoot board plane; the side and the sole ARE exactly perpendicular. Guess what? You can still tip that plane into the work piece if not careful. It has absolutely nothing to do with the squareness of the plane. So, sorry if that hurts your feelings, but I am not the one who came up with this, it is very well distributed in multiple books and articles. Don’t shoot the messenger, go after the people who researched this and put it in print if it does not fit your message.

-- Mike

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JayT

4783 posts in 1676 days


#9 posted 01-30-2016 02:23 PM

Then we will have to agree to disagree. My personal experience says it is much easier to prevent tipping into the cut with a perpendicular corner when using a bench plane for shooting.

Can you get a square cut with a not perpendicular corner? Of course. Can you take a plane that has a 90 degree corner and still tip it if not using proper technique? Yes. But why not try to set up everything in your favor to start with instead of having to make accommodations?

What I am saying and will continue to say is that doing this one small thing helped me tremendously and I believe it can help others.

-- "Good judgement is the result of experience. A lot of experience is the result of poor judgement."

View Aj2's profile

Aj2

692 posts in 1263 days


#10 posted 01-30-2016 03:20 PM

I would like to add my experience.Other have given excellent advice.Since its your first or second chute board try to keep everything square and flat.Also square the fence to the sole of your plane.Not he edge where your plane rides.There are small adjustments you can make as others have mentioned.Good luck.

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