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Marine Plywood - Looking for Advice

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Forum topic by senomozi posted 02-03-2010 05:21 PM 2705 views 0 times favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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senomozi

60 posts in 1841 days


02-03-2010 05:21 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question marine plywood

Hello LJs,

I have a customer who wants me to build a table and a small cabinet for his sailboat. Even though these will not be exposed to the weather (they will be installed in the main cabin) I want to use marine plywood.

I have been researching marine plywood on the web and find it difficult to come up with a choice. I have seen 3/4” sheets ranging from CAD 115 to CAD 350. Some claim to be BS1088 compliant while others don’t claim any compliance but still call the product “marine” grade. I have to match the existing woodwork. ( http://i1022.photobucket.com/albums/af342/senomozi/existing_cabinet.jpg ). Not sure what type of face veneer this is and if it was stained or not.

Can anyone provide some guidance here. Links to useful documentation would be great too.

Thanks.

-- Senomozi - Gatineau, Canada


11 replies so far

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sras

3871 posts in 1814 days


#1 posted 02-03-2010 06:22 PM

The picture link is not working …

My only experience with marine plywood is in building a kayak from Chesapeake Kayaks. They used a marine plywood called okume – a type of mahogany I believe. The only thing I remember is that it has no voids – a bad thing if you are using it as a boat hull. I’m not sure that a cabinet needs marine plywood, but it won’t hurt.

Are you sure you need 3/4” material? I’m not sure how big the cabinet is, but a large cabinet would be lighter while a small cabinet could benefit from a little more space by using 1/2” (or maybe 3/8” ?)

-- Steve - Impatience is Expensive

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CaptainSkully

1190 posts in 2244 days


#2 posted 02-03-2010 06:23 PM

Your question is a bit over my head, but I know that sailboat interiors are usually teak (if that helps at all). I use Bristol Finish water-based polyurethane, which is available at your local West Marine.

BTW, the photo link didn’t work. Good luck and keep us posted.

-- You can't control the wind, but you can trim your sails

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senomozi

60 posts in 1841 days


#3 posted 02-03-2010 07:51 PM

OK, the picture link now works.

-- Senomozi - Gatineau, Canada

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pommy

1697 posts in 2377 days


#4 posted 02-03-2010 07:57 PM

can you get veneered WBP boarding that is close to your colour match as i think teak tho correct for what you want to do is very expensive i have made manty boat interiors with marine ply that is veneered but i’m in the UK so i cant surgest anywhere for you SORRY

Andy

-- cut it saw it scrap it SKPE: ANDREW.CARTER69

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senomozi

60 posts in 1841 days


#5 posted 02-03-2010 07:58 PM

Steve said: “Are you sure you need 3/4” material? I’m not sure how big the cabinet is, but a large cabinet would be lighter while a small cabinet could benefit from a little more space by using 1/2” (or maybe 3/8” ?)”

That’s a valid point. I want 3/4” for the table because it will be supported in only two points by the existing table support mechanism. I will need a little more than 1/2 a sheet for that so I figured I would use the rest of the sheet for the cabinet instead of buying a thinner sheet for it. Just trying to save the customer some money ;-)

-- Senomozi - Gatineau, Canada

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pommy

1697 posts in 2377 days


#6 posted 02-03-2010 08:00 PM

3/4 looks so much better as well

-- cut it saw it scrap it SKPE: ANDREW.CARTER69

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Chris Wright

534 posts in 2166 days


#7 posted 02-03-2010 10:06 PM

To my knowledge, marine plywood is made to be submerged or at least in repetative contact with water. If this is going inside the cabin, you should be fine useing regular ply with a marine grade finsh.

-- "At its best, life is completely unpredictable." - Christopher Walken

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Routerisstillmyname

712 posts in 2194 days


#8 posted 02-06-2010 08:09 AM

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rlwilson

46 posts in 1733 days


#9 posted 02-06-2010 09:48 AM

Marine ply has more to it than water resistance… the plys have to be solid with no voids because they are use as a structural core material. there are 2 grades 1088 (only buy if it has a lloyds of London stamp there are lots of fakes) which has the highest quality benchmarks and 6566 which is a little lower and good for smaller boats and parts with a lesser structural load… there are a few wood choices in either grade Okumie being the lightest, and some companies have even branded there own panels (hydrotech basically 6566 meranti) (powerply) (eurolite) and so on… Marine ply is quite confusing… however for your part I would use a exterior ply as anything else is overkill… if you must use marine ply find a 6566 grade as you do not need 1088.
I have been building ply core composite boats for 10 years.

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jackass

350 posts in 2398 days


#10 posted 02-06-2010 03:58 PM

You are in Quebec (La Belle Province) and quite likely your project will not see salt water. Depending on how large the table is, I would use solid wood if it is small. I’m no expert, but the wood pictured looks like mahogany, teak would be darker, so if you chose maple or birch I’m sure you could match the stain, and I think you, by the sound of things, could butt joint enough wood to complete what you want, biscuits, t&g etc. I don’t like working with plywood. Most manufacturers try to disguize plywood anyway.
Jack

-- Jack Keefe Shediac NB Canada

View JohnL's profile

JohnL

33 posts in 1554 days


#11 posted 12-10-2010 11:36 PM

Your project is probably already done but…

What I understand from a bunch of reading is that the only major difference between ‘marine grade’ and regular plywood is that marine grade has no surface knots and has no voids and the manufacturer certifies the boards as such. There is regular plywood which matches both of these requirements but does not go the level of certifying as such. The reason you’d want marine-ply would be for exterior and structural work, all of which would be sealed with epoxy, which would take care of the waterproof issue.

So, for your project, you’d be able to use any wood which would match.

-- I'm looking forward to regretting this.

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