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Made a table saw foot switch

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Forum topic by RobinDobbie posted 01-28-2016 08:24 PM 1373 views 0 times favorited 52 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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RobinDobbie

133 posts in 1200 days


01-28-2016 08:24 PM

52 replies so far

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716

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#1 posted 01-28-2016 08:31 PM

Looks more like a suicidal device. What are the chances of accidental turn on ? 50/50 ?

-- It's nice!

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RobinDobbie

133 posts in 1200 days


#2 posted 01-28-2016 08:37 PM

Nope.

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ThomasChippendale

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#3 posted 01-28-2016 09:30 PM

...What are the chances of accidental turn on ?... given time, 100%

-- PJ

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ste6168

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#4 posted 01-28-2016 09:42 PM

No thanks.

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DirtyMike

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#5 posted 01-28-2016 09:56 PM

i would say the chance of accidental power up is 80 % , for those that prefer that in a fraction see below.

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RobinDobbie

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#6 posted 01-28-2016 10:43 PM

I could see accidentally hitting it while sweeping or vacuuming. Maybe you all can explain how an upside down switch, to the side of the saw, that would require a foot to lift up and pull out, could get turned on accidentally? I mean it seems really obvious to you folks, I feel silly for missing it.

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MrUnix

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#7 posted 01-28-2016 10:53 PM

Not going to address the accidental start scenario, but gotta ask why you would want a foot switch on a table saw in the first place? Seems really inconvenient, and would be really difficult to turn the machine off in the event something goes wrong and you need to stop it in a hurry. Kind of the reason why you see them with the big huge red “STOP” buttons, and some go even further with the emergency stop bar across the front that you can hit with you knee.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

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RobinDobbie

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#8 posted 01-28-2016 11:05 PM

I certainly don’t see how it’s difficult to turn off. That just doesn’t make any sense, Brad.

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716

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#9 posted 01-28-2016 11:19 PM


I could see accidentally hitting it while sweeping or vacuuming. Maybe you all can explain how an upside down switch, to the side of the saw, that would require a foot to lift up and pull out, could get turned on accidentally? I mean it seems really obvious to you folks, I feel silly for missing it.

- RobinDobbie

It does not require lift up, it requires push away and towards the operator. So:

1. Relocating the saw away from you will guarantee to turn it on every time something big enough is on the floor. Worse yet it might cause the situation at p.5 pr p.6.
2. Tripping over a cord has a very high chance of pulling the switch.
3. A cat deciding to scratch on the piece of that wood will switch the saw on.
4. A piece of wood fallen from the table can ricochet is the wrong direction and turn the saw on.
5. A piece of wood stuck under the switch will prevent the saw from turning off at a critical moment.
6. Hitting the switch from the side will break the lever off with no means to turn the saw off.

Need more?

-- It's nice!

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RobinDobbie

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#10 posted 01-28-2016 11:47 PM

Well, thanks for the feedback.

1 and 2 could be eliminated if I put a guard on the back and side.

No cats allowed in the workshop, so 3 is out.

I think the guard for 1 and 2 could eliminate 4 as well.

I think if the shop is messy enough for 5, then there could be problems anyway.

Again, side and back guard would eliminate 6.

I think they’re all super unlikely, but I don’t want you to think I don’t appreciate your feedback.

As someone pointed out on YouTube, the switch I used isn’t really meant to have it’s lever extended, and they could brake easily. That’s the main problem I see at the moment.

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MrUnix

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#11 posted 01-28-2016 11:58 PM

I certainly don t see how it s difficult to turn off. That just doesn t make any sense, Brad.
- RobinDobbie

Well, if you are cool with it, that’s all that counts :)

I just can imagine scenarios where trying to hit that switch with your foot might be challenging given it’s position and relative obscurity, particularly in an emergency type situation where you may need to focus your attention on other areas. That’s why those mag safety switches have an enlarged area that can be hit with just about anything to stop the machine. Yours is pretty much limited to the tip of your foot.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

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716

502 posts in 381 days


#12 posted 01-29-2016 12:15 AM


I just can imagine scenarios where trying to hit that switch with your foot might be challenging given it s position and relative obscurity, particularly in an emergency type situation where you may need to focus your attention on other areas. That s why those mag safety switches have an enlarged area that can be hit with just about anything to stop the machine. Yours is pretty much limited to the tip of your foot.

Cheers,
Brad

- MrUnix


On the bright side he can leash a dog to the switch and yell at it when something happens. The dog would run away and turn off the switch. So in some scenarios it can be even safer than the standard switch.

-- It's nice!

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RobinDobbie

133 posts in 1200 days


#13 posted 01-29-2016 12:23 AM



I just can imagine scenarios where trying to hit that switch with your foot might be challenging given it s position and relative obscurity

I wonder what position would I need to be in where I couldn’t hit that with my foot, but I would be able to reach a higher hand switch.

On the bright side he can leash a dog to the switch and yell at it when something happens. The dog would run away and turn off the switch. So in some scenarios it can be even safer than the standard switch.

- 716

Wut?

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Nubsnstubs

826 posts in 1195 days


#14 posted 01-29-2016 12:30 AM

Yeppers, try cutting a 4×8 sheet and have an urgent need to access the switch. Looks like a lot of fun is in your future. Toss the switch location, and practice your woodworking adventure safely. ........... Jerry (in Tucson)

-- Jerry (in Tucson)

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RobinDobbie

133 posts in 1200 days


#15 posted 01-29-2016 12:34 AM

Thanks for the feedback and advice, Jerry. I currently don’t put entire 4’ x 8’ sheets on my saws. But if I’m 4 or 8 feet away, I still don’t think I’d be able to reach a standard switch.

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