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tools in the 1890s

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Forum topic by whiteshoecovers posted 01-28-2016 06:23 PM 706 views 0 times favorited 10 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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whiteshoecovers

41 posts in 545 days


01-28-2016 06:23 PM

Just curious here. I own a victorian home in Denver, CO built in the 1890s. All of the woodwork is exquisite. I was wondering what type of tools they would have used. Both to produce all of the various moldings and for the finish carpentry.

Thanks.


10 replies so far

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Tim

3110 posts in 1422 days


#1 posted 01-28-2016 07:22 PM

I’m no expert, but I’ve read by that time most molding was made on belt driven machines in production shops. The amount of finish work done on site with hand tools would vary a lot I’m thinking.

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James Wright

228 posts in 324 days


#2 posted 01-28-2016 08:17 PM

After the civil war to the turn of the century more and more was moved to manufacturing, but a lot was still made on site with hand tools. the tools they would have used on site would have nee a broad list of things. from molding planes, and chisels to dove tale saws, and gouges. if you have a picture of the molding you are asking about we can give you a few ideas of what methods could have been used to make it.

-- James Wright, Rockford IL, https://www.youtube.com/c/WoodWright

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hotbyte

841 posts in 2436 days


#3 posted 01-28-2016 08:27 PM

Our home here in GA was built in 1895. It was built by church to be a parsonage so it is not overly ornate. My dad used to talk about there being a “planing mill” mill here that made local molding, milled lumber, etc. I’ve always envisioned something like from the Waltons tv show :)

Our casing are all fluted so likely ran on some type of shaper with knives. We also have rosettes that were likely made on a lathe with a face plate. Several still have an X penciled on back and small hole where it was attached.

View lateralus819's profile

lateralus819

2236 posts in 1350 days


#4 posted 01-29-2016 02:13 AM

Id be curious of this too.

My inlaws own an old farm house in Upstate NY that was built circa 1860/70. I would be surprised if there was a home anywhere in the world with more woodwork in it. I’ve never seen so many raised panels. I bet there is over 200 panels.

The ceilings have this incredibly intricate moldings with curved corners and the like. Quite incredible to say the least.

View Rick M's profile

Rick M

7909 posts in 1841 days


#5 posted 01-29-2016 04:57 AM



Id be curious of this too.

My inlaws own an old farm house in Upstate NY that was built circa 1860/70. I would be surprised if there was a home anywhere in the world with more woodwork in it. I ve never seen so many raised panels. I bet there is over 200 panels.

The ceilings have this incredibly intricate moldings with curved corners and the like. Quite incredible to say the least.

- lateralus819

Not to go off topic but you should get pictures and post in a blog. I’d love to see and bet many others would too.

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

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oldnovice

5721 posts in 2828 days


#6 posted 01-29-2016 06:47 AM

Aren’t some of the crown moldings made of plaster?
Same with some of the ceiling medallions.

-- "I never met a board I didn't like!"

View rwe2156's profile

rwe2156

2190 posts in 941 days


#7 posted 01-29-2016 12:45 PM

Of course moulding planes can produce any type but in small runs for furniture usually I think.

That amount of moulding at that time its doubtful hand made.
A little research would prove but I think in that era a carpenter would buy factory mouldings produced in steam powered mills.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

View ChuckV's profile

ChuckV

2880 posts in 2988 days


#8 posted 01-29-2016 02:23 PM

I volunteer at our town’s Historical Society. I preserved a large two-man molding plane very similar to this one:

One person pushes and the other pulls.

-- “Big man, pig man, ha ha, charade you are.” ― R. Waters

View bold1's profile

bold1

261 posts in 1308 days


#9 posted 01-29-2016 02:44 PM

Most were made in mills in the area. Before kiln drying most lumber wasn’t shipped far after it was milled. But I remember my father talking about my Great grand-father making Gingerbread for trimming houses in his shop, with a coping saw, in the winter time. Hoping to sell it on the next home he would build. It didn’t cost much in material and was time he wasn’t working building homes. He never said, but I’ve always thought that most of the little extras like rounded moldings were probably done like that. Cottage industry, you would call it, with some big shops making things by hand on order. Just like now.

View Bill White's profile

Bill White

4449 posts in 3421 days


#10 posted 01-29-2016 03:10 PM

Don’t ya just love the old craftsmanship? Kinda wish I had a time machine to watch those folks at work.
Bill

-- bill@magraphics.us

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