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Scraper vs Plane?

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Forum topic by nmssis posted 01-28-2016 04:05 PM 934 views 0 times favorited 44 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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nmssis

102 posts in 452 days


01-28-2016 04:05 PM

Once again, I’ve come to draw from the well of wisdom.

I’ve been practicing truing up 1 to 2 inch sides with hand planes n such and getting better at it…so that’s good news.

However, often times I come so very close and see like half the hair strand of gap on the side i’m truing up. But when I plane further I tend to do more damage than good. Because of this I have to plane more to correct and loose more wood. This has been very frustrating.

So the question: If I am that close to the end, can I use scraper to flatten the edge…has anyone tried?

Thanks, Everyone!!

PS: I know I have to keep practicing but that aside…

-- Learn something new everyday!


44 replies so far

View HokieKen's profile

HokieKen

1807 posts in 606 days


#1 posted 01-28-2016 06:50 PM

I think it would be much harder to true that last little bit with a scraper. Scrapers barely remove material and there is nothing to keep it flat. Add to that the flexibility of the scraper and you’re probably not even taking a flat pass.

I’d suggest keeping at it with the plane. When I just need to remove light cuts in a specific area, I will use a block plane set for a very light shaving. You might also consider dedicating a plane just for squaring edges and make a fence for it that you hold flush to the face. Then when you get a full width shaving down the entire board, you know it’s square.

Another alternative that I would opt for over a scraper would be a fine rasp.

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

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Smitty_Cabinetshop

13738 posts in 2086 days


#2 posted 01-28-2016 06:52 PM

If it feels smooth, it is smooth. Don’t fret too much over straightedge readings, but trust what you see.

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. -- OldTools Archive --

View James Wright's profile

James Wright

234 posts in 331 days


#3 posted 01-28-2016 08:13 PM

Depends on you. I personally have a smoothing plane (#3) that is always set so fine that I can not tell the difference between passes untell I make several. and I like to use that. but a lot of people have a solid skill with the card scraper. I say it is up to what you want to learn.

-- James Wright, Rockford IL, https://www.youtube.com/c/WoodWright

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HornedWoodwork

222 posts in 682 days


#4 posted 01-28-2016 08:51 PM

When I edge joint by hand, I know I am going to make a mistake, so I choose the mistake I want. First I make as few passes with the planer as possible to reduce the tendency to take the edge out of square, second I concentrate the majority of the passes on the middle of the boards. This way I am sure that the edges will meet nicely and if I don’t have a perfect joint, I have at least made a “spring joint” which means I can close it with clamping pressure and it is actually less likely to open over time. I would not recommend a card scraper, it’s poorly suited to what you want to do.

-- Talent, brilliance, and humility are my virtues.

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bandit571

14640 posts in 2150 days


#5 posted 01-28-2016 09:01 PM

Olde School way? Scrap piece of window glass. Freshly cut straight edge. Either pull or push, works either way. There is no flex to this, just push or pull tilted in the direction you are going. Edge getting dull? Cut a fresh one, and carry on….

IF the piece has molded curves? match them with the cut on the glass. Had a shop a long time ago….there were a few windows getting broken from the neighborhood’s ball players. I’d even repair the broken window(s) just to get another decent piece of glass to scrape with.

I do use a hand plane as well. I have a couple with straight edges to their irons. I have a light that shines across the piece, when it all shines back at me the same way, piece is smoothed and flat enough.

-- A Planer? I'M the planer, this is what I use

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nmssis

102 posts in 452 days


#6 posted 01-28-2016 10:00 PM

Thanks, everyone for the replies. it’s awesome to be able to see the possibilities…will go n experiment some more.

-- Learn something new everyday!

View SirIrb's profile

SirIrb

1239 posts in 698 days


#7 posted 01-28-2016 10:59 PM

I love card scrapers. I no longer sand. I scrape. Better and faster finish. Make one out of an old hand saw blade. Better steel. And yes, I think it is proper to follow up planing by scraping.

-- Don't blame me, I voted for no one.

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nmssis

102 posts in 452 days


#8 posted 01-29-2016 12:02 AM



I love card scrapers. I no longer sand. I scrape. Better and faster finish. Make one out of an old hand saw blade. Better steel. And yes, I think it is proper to follow up planing by scraping.

- SirIrb

so you plane then scrape? even for prepping sides for glue jointing?

-- Learn something new everyday!

View shampeon's profile

shampeon

1718 posts in 1651 days


#9 posted 01-29-2016 12:13 AM

There’s no need to scrape glued faces. Scraping is done in lieu of sanding, or for dealing with wood that’s difficult to plane (highly figured wood, reversing grain, knots).

-- ian | "You can't stop what's coming. It ain't all waiting on you. That's vanity."

View Tim's profile

Tim

3119 posts in 1429 days


#10 posted 01-29-2016 12:18 AM

Even if you could improve the squareness a little with a scraper, it would be hard not to create some peaks and valleys in the direction you are scraping in, so you’d make it less flat.

Basically you just need more practice. I’m still not perfect at edge jointing, but if I wrap my fingers from the hand guiding the plane under to slide along the wood gently then I can do a pretty decent job. I just need more practice too.

View Timmy2Hands's profile

Timmy2Hands

109 posts in 432 days


#11 posted 01-29-2016 12:22 AM

When I edge plane and I’m getting close to my final dimension, I back the iron off until it no longer cuts, then I sneak it back down until it takes a very very light cut and finally I work down to the line. That adjustment wheel is there for a reason and should be used.

-- Tim

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JeffP

573 posts in 859 days


#12 posted 01-29-2016 12:26 AM

if this is about prepping for edge glueing, I would think that some sort of a jig to be used with the plane might be advantageous.

Something sort of “shooting board” like such that you can make use of the fact that not only the sole of a plane, but also the sides are flat. The sides of a well adjusted plane would be very accurately at 90 degrees to the sole/iron.

Just thinking out loud, but seems like this could use some of the same advantages that the architecture of a powered jointer makes use of to get a true 90 degree and very straight edge on a board.

-- Last week I finally got my $*i# together. Unfortunately, it was in my shop, so I will probably never find it again.

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bandit571

14640 posts in 2150 days


#13 posted 01-29-2016 12:48 AM

Best way to joint two edges (or more..) is to clamp them together, like closing up a book. Plane all the edges at once…the unfold like opening a book. All edges will maych their neighbors. makes doing a panel glue up a lot less stessfull…. to the one holding the glue bottle.

A LONG bodied plane will give a straighter edge than a short smoother ever could. That is why they are called Jointer Planes. About anything over 20” long will do. Bear down on the front for the start, shift that pressure to the rear as you go along. the main reason for the fingers over the side of a plane is to help register to the board being planed. You can feel if the plane tilts to either side, and helps keep things centered on the iron’s cutting edge.

-- A Planer? I'M the planer, this is what I use

View nmssis's profile

nmssis

102 posts in 452 days


#14 posted 01-29-2016 12:55 AM



There s no need to scrape glued faces. Scraping is done in lieu of sanding, or for dealing with wood that s difficult to plane (highly figured wood, reversing grain, knots).

- shampeon

so sanding and scraping can be substitute for each other?

going back to my original question, i was referring to truing up the surface in preparation for gluing

-- Learn something new everyday!

View SirIrb's profile

SirIrb

1239 posts in 698 days


#15 posted 01-29-2016 01:06 AM

Scrape finished/almost finished surfaces.

I love card scrapers. I no longer sand. I scrape. Better and faster finish. Make one out of an old hand saw blade. Better steel. And yes, I think it is proper to follow up planing by scraping.

- SirIrb

so you plane then scrape? even for prepping sides for glue jointing?

- nmssis


-- Don't blame me, I voted for no one.

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