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Forum topic by DannyBoy posted 02-02-2010 09:45 PM 1004 views 1 time favorited 7 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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DannyBoy

521 posts in 3325 days


02-02-2010 09:45 PM

Topic tags/keywords: flooring dricore workshop

This will probably be the first of many questions I ask as I try to decide whether to stay in the basement or kick my wife’s garden stuff out of the tiny (18×9) garage and setup shop in there. Before I go into the floor issue, don’t think that it can’t been done in that space. Read this to see how it has been done successfully. (My motivation is to have a full 8ft cutting capacity which I don’t have in the basement.)

Anyway, step one of the decision is the floor. What can I do with it. So far, this is my obstacles:
  • Limited Ceiling Height (7’ 4”)
  • Drain in the Center of the Floor (approx center)
  • Known Water Travel from Garage Door and Laundry Room (opposite ends)
  • Hardened Concrete
  • Noticeable Drop from Edges to Drain

Obviously, the drain needs to be functional in some amount. Removing it not only poses it’s own hazards, it can also hinder sale of the house (since pooling water from a wet car in a garage is not a good thing). Also, I can’t change the grade to the drain for the same reason (so, no leveling compound).

The water drainage from the laundry room and the garage door are easy to fix. I’m planning on replacing the garage door anyway since I don’t want the role up in the way of a shop light. And the washing machine can either be fixed (new gasket) or I can put a plastic tray underneath to catch any drips.

The only option that I can conceive of is these DriCore panels available at Lowes.com. Does anyone have an opinion of them?

~DB

-- He said wood...http://hickbyassociation.blogspot.com/


7 replies so far

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Waldschrat

505 posts in 2896 days


#1 posted 02-03-2010 04:08 PM

I wish I could say something about these DriCore panels, but I have never used them before, at first they look like they should work and probably quick to install. They even include (or sell with) plastic shims to level out any spots where its not level.
So I would say I would probably shy away, becausewhen working in a workshop where the floor is not level is a pain. In my opinion, you would be saving a lot of aggrivation, if you built a sub frame of sort to take out this slight elevation in the floor…. then you save your self from always walking up hill in one direction, or having to constantly shim up work benches and tables and saws, and what ever else when you move it around, and in a small workshop, most things are mounted on wheels to be able to move out of the way. 7 foot 4 inches is a small ceiling but I do not think you can tell the difference if its circa 7 foot 2 inches instead.

That would make me a bit skeptical. especially if your garage has a grade several metres… one can not but the shims over all. It would be best maybe to sacrifice a couple of inches maybe 1.5 or so and make a frame under neath and install some proper 4X8 sheets of flooring panels, (osb plywood, you pick whats in your budget… I read the discription and it said that they should be finished again anyway with polyuerathane.

I think it would be worth the extra work.

just some things to think about….

By the way what is the difference from the garage door opening and the drain… i mean the fall? by how much must you compensate?

-- Nicholas, Cabinet/Furniture Maker, Blue Hill, Maine

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DannyBoy

521 posts in 3325 days


#2 posted 02-03-2010 04:22 PM

I’m not exactly sure what the total fall there is. I haven’t measured it yet. However, about three years ago we had a major sewer problem (that is fixed now) and water backed up in that room. It’s the only time it has happened. When it did, there was about an inch of water over top of the drain and the pool ended about three to four feet from the door. Assuming the grade is pretty constant and the drain is about ten feet away, I’d say I’m looking close to 2 inches of fall overall.

-- He said wood...http://hickbyassociation.blogspot.com/

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Waldschrat

505 posts in 2896 days


#3 posted 02-03-2010 04:32 PM

thats about what I would expected… building a small frame work underneath is not difficult, does not need to be pretty and should not use up that much wood. I would even consider building in smaller modules(say maybe 6 or 8), you are able to assemble together and each one is then probably easier to pass to the changing floor, (the garage is longer than wide so the side slope to I would expect).

And even if water backed up, only the frame work would get wet and as long as you could remove the flooring panels again, then it could dry out and your smiling! problem solved. I think it could work.

-- Nicholas, Cabinet/Furniture Maker, Blue Hill, Maine

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asmitty

39 posts in 2495 days


#4 posted 02-04-2010 07:55 PM

Danny, can you let me know what you end up doing about your floor and how it easy/hard it was? I have a similar problem with my garage floor. There is a drain in the center of the floor and everything “falls” to that train. Best of luck to you on your switch

-- even a mosquito doesn't get a slap on the back until he starts to work...

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russv

262 posts in 2629 days


#5 posted 02-04-2010 09:50 PM

DB,
I had a concrete floor in my old house lower level with similar attributes. I fixed it using ready made materials and for a minimum amount of money. It has lasted for at least 10 years so far and I spend only about $200 for a 16’x22’ area I believe.

the materials I used are 1”x4”x8’ pressure treated lumber and 1/2” OSB plywood sheets. I layed out the 1×4 on the floor in a 4×8 pattern to accomadate the plywood sheets eventually. Do not lay them on edge. Lay them flat. Pocket screw the frame together and shim the low places between the floor and the slants. be sure to shim no more than 4” apart and just shoot a brad nail to hold them in place. I would probably build a 2’x2’ squre frame around the drain area and make sure it it slightly raised with shims or the boards have plenty of dados on the bottom side to allow water to run to the drains. Once everything is reasonably level (doesn’t have to be perfect), fill in between with more boards(pocket screw everything) so that you have a frame with gaps of no more than 12” x 4” anywhere. Then you can lay 7/16’s or 1/2” OSB on the frame and just screw it down. By using screws, you can pull up sections to reshim if needed or check for water draining to the drain. use a small piece over the frame around the drain that you can pull it up easily to check it when needed. Shimming the frame and pocket screwing it together makes build it easy, solid, and cheap. I put indoor/outdoor carpet down on mine, but I suspect painting might work for you.

any questions?
russv

-- yknotwood.com: where to go because you don't want no stinking plastic!

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Waldschrat

505 posts in 2896 days


#6 posted 02-04-2010 10:20 PM

thats kind of what I was trying to describe! russv must have been reading my mind!;-) much better described!

-- Nicholas, Cabinet/Furniture Maker, Blue Hill, Maine

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russv

262 posts in 2629 days


#7 posted 02-04-2010 11:07 PM

I’ll be darn, I thought I forgot how to read & speak German. lol

I didn’t mention before. When building the frame, to level it, I screw it together and then use 4” screws and a 4’ level to level the frame. Go around and where ever it’s low, screw a long screw through the board into the floor till it raises the board level. leave the screws in place till all is level and shimmed.

russv

-- yknotwood.com: where to go because you don't want no stinking plastic!

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