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Forum topic by Michael303 posted 01-26-2016 09:21 PM 1061 views 1 time favorited 20 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Michael303

8 posts in 338 days


01-26-2016 09:21 PM

I’m going to start slowly remodeling some of the rooms the new home we just purchased and I’m just not sure where to even begin with my woodworking education.

I’d like to do some fairly basic built in cabinets and shelves for our living room entertainment center and then replace the cabinetry in our walk in closet with something that looks a little nicer. We’d like both projects would have a modern look with full overlay doors/drawers. “European” style frameless cabinets, I guess.

Is there some sort of standard system to this? I’ve heard of the 32mm system but I’m not sure really what it is or if it’s relevant. Any books or training on this that you can direct me to would be very helpful. Heck, even terms to search or tool systems that make this kind of work easier would be great.

Any info helps!

-- I'm new to woodworking, so explain it like I'm a 5 year old. - Michael


20 replies so far

View waho6o9's profile

waho6o9

7176 posts in 2043 days


#1 posted 01-26-2016 10:03 PM

http://www.cabsystems.com/KISSII/KIIrivDe-mail.pdf

Available online at www.kissii.com

welcome to LJs Michael303 and hope that helps!

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MT_Stringer

2854 posts in 2697 days


#2 posted 01-26-2016 10:32 PM

Check out this guy – Kris Reynolds Custom Cabinets.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F3uOkMK4UqM

I have adopted his basic workflow when building cabinets and other projects. His videos are easy to watch with no rambling or BS. He is straight to the point and demonstrates all facets of the cabinet construction.

I have been pleased with my projects as have the recipients. :-)

Our Kitchen Remodel
Blake and Joanne's Kitchen Remodel
Mom's Kitchen Cabinets
Our Buffet

Good luck with your projects. Post some pics. We like pics.

-- Handcrafted by Mike Henderson - Channelview, Texas

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jusfine

2405 posts in 2392 days


#3 posted 01-26-2016 11:13 PM

Jim Tolpin has written a couple of excellent books, I would recommend them.

-- Randy "You are judged as much by the questions you ask as the answers you give..."

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AandCstyle

2575 posts in 1723 days


#4 posted 01-26-2016 11:30 PM

Michael, I highly recommend this book. HTH

-- Art

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Michael303

8 posts in 338 days


#5 posted 01-27-2016 06:32 PM

Thanks a bunch for the feedback. I’ll take a look at everything.

I have a dumb question. When building frameless cabinets from plywood, how are the ends typically finished to cover the plywood layers?

-- I'm new to woodworking, so explain it like I'm a 5 year old. - Michael

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SirIrb

1239 posts in 696 days


#6 posted 01-27-2016 06:35 PM

Edgebanding. It is—depending on the finish—a piece of raw (unfinished) lumber veneer that has heat activated glue on the back side. Use and iron and apply. Trim, sand, finish.

-- Don't blame me, I voted for no one.

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Michael303

8 posts in 338 days


#7 posted 01-27-2016 06:44 PM

Thanks for the answer. I suppose that makes the most sense.

-- I'm new to woodworking, so explain it like I'm a 5 year old. - Michael

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AlaskaGuy

2406 posts in 1775 days


#8 posted 01-27-2016 07:47 PM

For frameless cabinets the first thing you want to learn is how to cut truly square parts and be able to build a square box. A lot of the advantages of frameless depend on doing process accurately.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

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Michael303

8 posts in 338 days


#9 posted 01-27-2016 08:25 PM

Thanks for the tip. Are there any tricks to that other than checking with a square and measuring corner to corner?

-- I'm new to woodworking, so explain it like I'm a 5 year old. - Michael

View OggieOglethorpe's profile (online now)

OggieOglethorpe

1213 posts in 1576 days


#10 posted 01-27-2016 09:16 PM

If you have to ask, start in the closet, NOT the living room or kitchen. Even a bathroom vanity is a decent place to start.

You may “successfully” complete your kitchen or living room built-in, but by the time you do the others, you’ll know many better techniques and might even have very different ideas of what you want or can build.

View Michael303's profile

Michael303

8 posts in 338 days


#11 posted 01-27-2016 09:24 PM

Haha. That’s probably not a bad tip. I actually need a new bathroom vanity for my townhome rental properly. I’m sure I can buy a cheap vanity that would work but making one might be good practice. Maybe I could write off some tools too!

-- I'm new to woodworking, so explain it like I'm a 5 year old. - Michael

View waho6o9's profile

waho6o9

7176 posts in 2043 days


#12 posted 01-27-2016 09:29 PM

“I have a dumb question.”

Not ^^

It’s wise to ask and save yourself time and material :)

View MT_Stringer's profile

MT_Stringer

2854 posts in 2697 days


#13 posted 01-27-2016 10:32 PM

Sorry, I can’t help ya. I don’t do frameless. Much easier for me to build the face frames and git on down the road. :-)

-- Handcrafted by Mike Henderson - Channelview, Texas

View Mark Kornell's profile

Mark Kornell

1061 posts in 1997 days


#14 posted 01-29-2016 03:48 AM



Thanks for the tip. Are there any tricks to that other than checking with a square and measuring corner to corner?

- Michael303

Build some right-angle braces to help with squaring up the case. If you get one corner square, the 3 other corners fall in line. If you’re paranoid, you can use the braces on opposite corners.

This is the kind of thing I’m talking about (courtesy of Wood magazine, from http://www.woodmagazine.com/woodworking-plans/clamping/right-angle-jig-gives-you-a-corner-on-clamping-tasks/ ):

It helps to put packing tape on the edges that come in contact with your cases, makes sure glue doesn’t stick.

Also, typical cabinet construction will have you rabetting the back edges of the case for an inset back. If you make sure the back is an exact fit (and is also square!), you pretty much guarantee the case will be square.

Another tip: do everything you can prior to assembling the cases. The joinery is obvious, but also drill all the holes you need. Think through it, maybe take a look at some frameless cabinets up close and take note of the purpose of all the holes.

Build yourself a hole-drilling jig. In System32, all holes are drilled in the same layout. Take the time to understand the system layout and build a good template. That guarantees you will be able to use standard hardware.

-- Mark Kornell, Kornell Wood Design

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shastaman

30 posts in 315 days


#15 posted 01-29-2016 03:56 AM

You may “successfully” complete your kitchen or living room built-in, but by the time you do the others, you ll know many better techniques and might even have very different ideas of what you want or can build.

- OggieOglethorpe

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