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Wood Veneer on Cube?

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Forum topic by Luke2 posted 01-26-2016 07:57 PM 668 views 0 times favorited 15 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Luke2

10 posts in 1909 days


01-26-2016 07:57 PM

Hi,
I need some help. I have a project where i need to make a bunch of 3” wood cubes that have veneer on 5 sides (none on back since it will hang on the wall). I’ve watched a bunch of videos on laying veneer, but mostly on the surface of the projects. I’m wondering what the proper way is to lay the veneer, then trim without scratching the previously placed veneer? Thanks for any help. I attached a picture of what i want to make.


15 replies so far

View dhazelton's profile

dhazelton

2324 posts in 1760 days


#1 posted 01-26-2016 08:23 PM

You could use 3M spray cement to put the veneer on and trim off the excess with a razor knife. That’s what I would do. If you spray both surfaces to tacky and put them together the bond is pretty quick so you won’t be waiting forever for glue to dry.

View shipwright's profile

shipwright

7170 posts in 2262 days


#2 posted 01-27-2016 12:50 AM

I would hammer veneer them with hot hide glue. It would be an easy way to get them done quickly and permanently without the need for any clamping rigs. I would not consider spray or contact adhesives if you want a quality job.

Hammer veneering has a learning curve but it is a skill that will serve you well if you want to get serious about veneering.

-- Paul M ..............If God wanted us to have fiberglass boats he would have given us fibreglass trees. http://thecanadianschooloffrenchmarquetry.com/

View Luke2's profile

Luke2

10 posts in 1909 days


#3 posted 01-27-2016 02:26 AM

So what is the easiest way to cut off the excess veneer? Is there a special tool or is a razor blade acceptable?

View JAAune's profile

JAAune

1643 posts in 1781 days


#4 posted 01-27-2016 02:38 AM

Sharp razor and a slicing cut works fine. Angle the blade so that it pushes the veneer into the cube instead of away from it. Cut from both ends towards the middle to avoid blowing out the corners.

-- See my work at http://remmertstudios.com and http://altaredesign.com

View shipwright's profile

shipwright

7170 posts in 2262 days


#5 posted 01-27-2016 03:14 AM

+1 JAAune.
You can also use an Exacto knife or scalpel on thin commercial veneer.

-- Paul M ..............If God wanted us to have fiberglass boats he would have given us fibreglass trees. http://thecanadianschooloffrenchmarquetry.com/

View Ger21's profile

Ger21

1047 posts in 2595 days


#6 posted 01-27-2016 12:56 PM

A simple way to veneer those is with titebond, clamped between two cauls. Do two sides at a time, and the face last.
You can trim it with a laminate trimmer and a SHARP bit. It shouldn’t splinter if it’s glued well. It might get a little fuzzy, but that’s easily sanded off.

-- Gerry, http://www.thecncwoodworker.com/index.html http://www.jointcam.com

View Luke2's profile

Luke2

10 posts in 1909 days


#7 posted 07-06-2016 02:53 AM

So finally getting around to doing this. The block in the middle that I will be veneering to is soft maple I believe. I bought a small pack of purple heart unbacked veneer to try it with. Is there a difference in gluing with unbacked veneer compared to backed? Would using paperbacked be easier? I don’t have a vacuum press or anything. I like the titebond glue between two cauls idea.

View Kiwib0y's profile

Kiwib0y

89 posts in 487 days


#8 posted 07-06-2016 08:41 AM

Hi Luke2. Do not be wary to learn a new way and a proven way to glue veneer as Shipwright has stated. If you don’t get the glue task correct you can heat the hide glue and it releases and you can re-glue unlike Titebond or other glues once set nearly always set with no chance of recovery. Give hide glue a try you will not go back.

-- "It is only a silly question if it is not asked" Don,New Zealand

View Luke2's profile

Luke2

10 posts in 1909 days


#9 posted 07-06-2016 02:48 PM

I’m going to try two methods and hide glue will be one. Is there a difference in hide glue as far from brand to brand? I know titebond makes one but am unsure of a quality brand.

Does hide glue work on thicker veneer, such as 1/16, or do most people use regular wood glue for that thick?

Thank you guys for all your help!

View shipwright's profile

shipwright

7170 posts in 2262 days


#10 posted 07-06-2016 07:11 PM

Hide glue will work on any thickness of veneer or solid wood for that matter but there is one major difference in types of it.
Hide glue comes in liquid and hot. Titebond’s hide glue is liquid. You can’t hammer veneer with it but it will work fine if you clamp it like you would pva. It will still give you the reversible qualities that KiwibOy referred to.

-- Paul M ..............If God wanted us to have fiberglass boats he would have given us fibreglass trees. http://thecanadianschooloffrenchmarquetry.com/

View Luke2's profile

Luke2

10 posts in 1909 days


#11 posted 07-07-2016 06:22 PM

would a vacuum press also work to do this? It would have be placed in a bunch of times to do all 5 sides though.

Also, should the side that goes against the wall be veneered or is that overkill? Not sure if the block could warp or anything.

View Waldo88's profile

Waldo88

188 posts in 760 days


#12 posted 07-07-2016 06:35 PM

A block isn’t going to warp.

3” is small enough that you should be fine with a few clamps and a caul. Using a vacuum press would be awkward and overkill.

View Waldo88's profile

Waldo88

188 posts in 760 days


#13 posted 07-07-2016 06:35 PM



A block isn t going to warp.

3” is small enough that you’ll be fine with a few clamps and a caul. Using a vacuum press would be awkward and overkill.

- Waldo88


View Luke2's profile

Luke2

10 posts in 1909 days


#14 posted 07-07-2016 07:00 PM

I might have to make a ton of these little things and wasn’t sure if a vacuum press would be any easier or not since they are pretty small. Thanks

View Richard's profile

Richard

1898 posts in 2154 days


#15 posted 07-07-2016 07:20 PM


I might have to make a ton of these little things and wasn t sure if a vacuum press would be any easier or not since they are pretty small. Thanks

- Luke2


If you buy a vacuum press that is large enough I would think you could do several at the same time and also be able to do two sides of each block at the same time on each block since one side would be down and the other side up.

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