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Buffing motor power ?? need advice

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Forum topic by lepelerin posted 01-25-2016 04:41 PM 619 views 0 times favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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lepelerin

478 posts in 1790 days


01-25-2016 04:41 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question buffer buffing wheel beall motor

Hi,

I am considering to get a Beall buffing system in the future.
I cannot use my grinder for it, it’s too small and too weak. I then need a motor. I am a hobbyist and the system won’t see a continuous use so I do not need something that will run for hours on. Room being utterly limited I am looking for a small footprint motor. I will install it on a base that I can move away when not needed.

I will start looking for a motor in local ads however I am wondering how much power is considered acceptable. 1/2HP, 1HP, ... and will look for a 1725RPM.

If you have experience with a similar setup would you mind sharing some information.

Thank in advance for your help and time.

Arnaud


11 replies so far

View TheFridge's profile

TheFridge

5765 posts in 951 days


#1 posted 01-25-2016 04:43 PM

I’d go with a 15 horse

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

View Lee's profile

Lee

51 posts in 343 days


#2 posted 01-25-2016 05:46 PM

Well, according to Woodcraft a 1/2 hp would work

-- Colombia Custom woodworking

View ThomasChippendale's profile

ThomasChippendale

244 posts in 397 days


#3 posted 01-25-2016 06:02 PM

For the occasional use, if you have a lathe, this is what I use : http://www.leevalley.com/US/Wood/page.aspx?p=46880&cat=1,190,43040

-- PJ

View slimpickens's profile

slimpickens

10 posts in 1416 days


#4 posted 01-25-2016 09:31 PM

I have the Beal system, I tried it on my small Delta Midi lathe. It didn’t have enough HP to turn it correctly. I now use my drill press, I can adjust the speed for the finish applied. I have found that about 800 rpms is the speed needed for my waterbase lacquer.

-- Slimpickens, Be true to yourself and helpful to others

View lepelerin's profile

lepelerin

478 posts in 1790 days


#5 posted 01-25-2016 09:54 PM

@The Fridge: 15, you are very modest :)

@LeeL Thank you,

@ThomasChippendale: I do not have a lathe but it’s a nice setup.

@slimpickens: Drill press. I thought about it and I was not sure how it would be convenient to use. vertical vs horizontal wheel. I measured and 8” is the absolute maximum I can run on my DP. That might be an option.

Thank you.

Edit PS: Is there anything in particular I should be looking for for this motor. Enclosed, ...

View Tennessee's profile

Tennessee

2410 posts in 1979 days


#6 posted 01-25-2016 10:00 PM

Have you taken a look at this?

This one is from Harbor Freight, for $39.99 retail, $32.00 with a 20% coupon.

This is the one I bought a couple years ago, and stripped off the grinding end and added another buffing wheel. Thing has buffed a LOT of golf club heads for my golf club hat racks.
It currently retails for $79.99, or $64 with a 20% off coupon.

-- Paul, Tennessee, http://www.tsunamiguitars.com

View Kelly's profile

Kelly

1113 posts in 2409 days


#7 posted 01-25-2016 10:51 PM

I have a couple dental buffers. The first Redwing I picked up for five at a second hand store and the second came with cabinet, lighting and dust collection for one hundred. Even used, it’s a thousand dollar unit. So, keep your eyes peeled. Both mine work great and you do have two speeds.

The nice thing about mine is, you can swap wheel quickly. If you could put spindles on yours, that would make it easy to swap them out.

https://www.google.com/search?q=buffing+spindles&ie=utf-8&oe=utf-8

I keep buff pads in a marked Zip Lock to keep them from getting contaminated and to see, at a glance, which compound is one them.

I suspect the forty dollar one Tennessee showed is worth looking at. For the money, it’d probably perform well. Remember, it doesn’t take any pressure to buff things out, for the most part.

View sawdustdad's profile

sawdustdad

131 posts in 350 days


#8 posted 01-25-2016 11:16 PM

Depends on what you are buffing. The bigger the item, the bigger the motor needed. You can buy a mandrel and use your own motor. I’d want a 1HP 1725rpm motor for a pair of 10 inch buffing wheels. 1/2 hp for 6 inch wheels would be the minimum.

http://www.grainger.com/product/DAYTON-Mandrel-6L099?s_pp=false&picUrl=//static.grainger.com/rp/s/is/image/Grainger/6L098_AS01?$smthumb$

-- Murphy's Carpentry Corollary #3: Any board cut to length has a 50% probability of being too short.

View lepelerin's profile

lepelerin

478 posts in 1790 days


#9 posted 01-26-2016 06:45 PM

No Harbour freight in my area. I wish there was one.
So from the comments and what I’ve read a 1hp motor would be more versatile and more of a jack of many trades.

Thank you

View moke's profile

moke

861 posts in 2241 days


#10 posted 01-26-2016 09:30 PM

I bought the Beall buff three wheel system and got a small MT2 Head stock lathe…..it works awesome. I have seen various used lathes for 100.00 here and there. I bought a Rikon econo for 199.00 and just use it for buffing. Its nice as you can regulate the speed. Beall makes nice buff wheels too. I have used Caswell as well…they are also reasonable. The lathe itself is only 1/2 horse and seems to do quite well…..make sure if you do that, you get an MT2 headstock, I don’t thing they make an MT! Beall buff, and if you use an adapter I doubt the ways would be long enough to accomidate it.

I did the exact same thing as “Tennessee” and took off the grinder part of the HF grinder-buffer. I put three bigger, softer Caswell buffs together ( they are cheap enough to do that) on one end and left the other end with the buff it came with . It works well, but I believe it is 3450rpm and you have to be careful with it, as it is very aggressive. The lathe system is much more managable, but cost at least twice as much too.

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lepelerin

478 posts in 1790 days


#11 posted 01-26-2016 10:10 PM

Lathe is not an option, money wise and I would have no room for it.
Yes I see lathes from time to time in my area that are pretty cheap and would be a good solution. In the meantime I have and will adapt.

I am wondering on which type of appliance I could get a motor (furnace, dryer, ...) Any ideas?
Thank you

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