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Purchased my first 13" thickness planer - some simple questions

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Forum topic by The__Dude posted 01-24-2016 06:20 PM 1336 views 0 times favorited 18 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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The__Dude

125 posts in 523 days


01-24-2016 06:20 PM

Topic tags/keywords: planer ridgid twist dust

Instead of working on my saw dust system , I played with my recent and first thickness planer purchase.
In hind sight, I should have worked on the dust system as this thing throws the chips!

I was playing with some construction lumber.

I learned this does not take twist out of the board.
I would need to hand plane one side flat, then I can thickness plane?
Or are there any tricks with the planer?

I am trying to see what this snip is, I saw it on the first pass of the first board.
But after that there is not much there.

I am planning to use the HF large dust system.
Is it typical to use this on a planer?
Or are people pushing direct into a garbage can?


18 replies so far

View Jim Finn's profile

Jim Finn

2408 posts in 2383 days


#1 posted 01-24-2016 07:12 PM

I have had my DeWalt planner discharge into a trash can and it works well with the bag designed for that. As far as I know that accessory is no longer available though. A few years ago I hooked the planer into a 2 HP Dust Collector that is outside in a small closet built for it. My shop is dusty enough. I do not need a dust collector discharging fine dust into my workshop. A jointer is used to flatten one side of a twisted board and then it is run through a planer with the flat side down. You can build a sled to use through the planer to straighten out a twisted board also. If you have a problem with snipe, a common problem, lift the trailing end of the board as the board enters the planner and then lift the leading end as it exits. This will demonstrate how you need to adjust the infeed and out-feed tables to eliminate snipe.

-- "You may have your PHD but I have my GED and my DD 214"

View Ger21's profile

Ger21

1047 posts in 2592 days


#2 posted 01-24-2016 07:21 PM

Ideally, yes, you want to use a dust collector. The Harbor Freight 2HP works great with a small planer.

No, a planer does not remove warp, twist, or bow. You need a jointer for that. A planer just changes the thickness of a board, and makes the face that your planing parallel to the bottom face.

-- Gerry, http://www.thecncwoodworker.com/index.html http://www.jointcam.com

View CharlesA's profile

CharlesA

3019 posts in 1258 days


#3 posted 01-24-2016 07:49 PM

You can use hand planes, a jointer, or a planer sled to flatten a board. I made a planer sled and find it to be a pretty cumbersome process. I spent a some time adjusting infeed and outfeed to be deal flat to the planer, but then discovered with mine (Ridgid) that I got a lot less snipe by raising each about 1/8”. I get very little that way.

-- "Man is the only animal which devours his own, for I can apply no milder term to the general prey of the rich on the poor." ~Thomas Jefferson

View teejk02's profile

teejk02

423 posts in 586 days


#4 posted 01-24-2016 08:57 PM

Shavings from the planer are pretty coarse…I let them hit the floor and sweep up later (that Libman dust pan with the upright handle is my fan as are the big paper lawn and leaf bags sold my any of the big box stores). That said I own a Delta 13” and have had no problems with clogging. A friend has the Dewalt 735 and he says it requires a vac.

View TheWoodRaccoon's profile

TheWoodRaccoon

364 posts in 390 days


#5 posted 01-25-2016 01:35 AM



Shavings from the planer are pretty coarse…I let them hit the floor and sweep up later (that Libman dust pan with the upright handle is my fan as are the big paper lawn and leaf bags sold my any of the big box stores). That said I own a Delta 13” and have had no problems with clogging. A friend has the Dewalt 735 and he says it requires a vac.

- teejk02

Which Delta do you have? The 22-555? If so, what are your thoughts?

-- still trying to think of a clever signature......

View lew's profile

lew

11335 posts in 3216 days


#6 posted 01-25-2016 01:49 AM

Jim mentioned the Dewalt chip collector that used to be available. I was too cheap to buy one and made this-

http://lumberjocks.com/topics/15116

-- Lew- Time traveler. Purveyor of the Universe's finest custom rolling pins.

View Alan72's profile

Alan72

187 posts in 1494 days


#7 posted 01-25-2016 02:51 AM

you can always use a shop vac until you save up for a dust collector. Go to CL and type in dust collectors there is always good deals
.

View JBrow's profile

JBrow

817 posts in 381 days


#8 posted 01-25-2016 04:53 AM

The__Dude,

Congratulations on your new toy!

The trick I use to manage and even eliminate snip is to keep the infeed and outfeed feed roller heights at the same height throughout the planer run – not letting the infeed or outfeed feed rollers return to their natural resting height. In principle it is as if you were running one really long board through the planer. I am not exactly sure why this works, but it does.

The way this is done is to start a planer run with a sacrificial piece of stock the same approximate thickness as the project stock and long enough to pass safely through the planer. Width does not seem to matter much. As the sacrificial stock is disappearing from view on the infeed side of the planer, begin running the project stock – butting it up to the end of the disappearing stock. As each piece of project stock begins to disappear from view, start the next piece of project stock. Repeat this process until the last piece of stock is about to disappear from view on the infeed side of the planer. At this point, as the last piece of project stock is about to disappear, run the sacrificial piece of stock through. Thus the sacrificial piece is run through the planer twice, at the beginning and at the end of the planer run. The snipe on all project stock is greatly reduced and often eliminated.

The key to succeeding with this method is to stay focused. From time to time, I lose focus and the infeed roller drops. This may result in snipe at the end of the exiting piece. If this happens, send the sacrificial piece of stock through and then resume running the project stock.

When you are all done, get rid of the sacrificial piece of stock to avoid mistakenly using it in your project. It may not be the thickness you need.

Other snipe managing tips I found successful is to run the shortest pieces of stock possible through the planer. When the stock is long, supporting the stock on both the infeed and outfeed sides of the planer reduces upward pressure on the feed rollers. Supporting the stock helps avoid the stock rotating up into the cutter head on the single engaged feed roller. A roller stand on the outfeed side helps but is a pain to use, especially if your planer bed raises or lowers to adjust for depth of cut. I normally support long stock on the infeed side with my hand, until it is at least a third of the way is through the planer.

Proceed with caution if you plan to adjust the feed roller tension. Too little tension on the feed rollers can lead to kick back. Too much feed roller tension can cause the lumber to stall while in the planer. If you adjust the feed rollers, do so while remaining within the manufacture’s specifications.

Any dust collection is better than no dust collection. Shavings trapped under a project board can affect the final thickness of the project stock, introducing unexpected thickness variations. These variations can make glue ups and joinery a greater challenge.

Dust collection is complex and can become costly. A 12” thickness planer requires about 500 Cubic Feet per Minute (CFM) of air flow to be effective. Since the published CFM on dust collectors is typically lower than can be achieved at the tool, going bigger is better. If a direct connection is made from the collector to the planer with the shortest length of flex hose possible, going not much bigger than 500 CFM would probably work. I collected shavings from my 12 thickness planer for years with a ½ hp dust collector. Even though it collected most shavings, I still had a mess to cleanup afterwards.

Cupped lumber (across the width) with no twist and no bow along its length can be planed flat without flattening one face first if planed so that the both outer edges of the lumber are in full contact with the planer bed during the first few runs. However, this is rare. There is usually a twist of some kind in or a bow in a length of the lumber. The extent of the twist or bow can sometimes by lessened by cutting the board to a shorter length. The twist or bow has to be removed from one face; by a sled (check out YouTube), hand planing, or a jointer in order to arrive at flat stock with parallel faces. The jointer, while it can be dangerous without proper safety precautions, is the fastest way to get stock flat on one face.

Generally:

1) Keep the planer bed slick. This helps to prevent stock from stalling inside the planer. Many reduce bed friction by using furniture paste wax, re-applying as needed.

2) Keep the feed rollers clean. Clean feed roller grip the stock better than when dirty and keep it moving through the planer. The manual should discuss this procedure.

3) Make a gauge block. I made mine by cutting dados of varying widths across the width of a single 6” wide flat board. As I plane, I check the thickness of the stock by trying to insert the edge of the planed board in the dado whose width corresponds to the thickness I am after. For example, if I am done planing to a thickness of ¾”, the project stock will just fit into the ¾” dado I cut into my gauge block.

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

4208 posts in 1660 days


#9 posted 01-25-2016 05:37 AM

My planer shoots chips out like a snow blower on steroids! I just open up the sliding glass door, point the planer in that direction, and blow them right out into the yard :) The shop vac is just used to pick up the errant bits that decided to go astray.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

View rwe2156's profile

rwe2156

2190 posts in 941 days


#10 posted 01-25-2016 11:31 AM

Snipe can be reduced by slight upward pressure as the board goes in and out.

Brad – when I had some tree stumps ground the shavings had to be cleaned up because they attract termites.
Something to think about if you’re looking at a pile of shavings in your yard.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

View teejk02's profile

teejk02

423 posts in 586 days


#11 posted 01-25-2016 01:00 PM


Shavings from the planer are pretty coarse…I let them hit the floor and sweep up later (that Libman dust pan with the upright handle is my fan as are the big paper lawn and leaf bags sold my any of the big box stores). That said I own a Delta 13” and have had no problems with clogging. A friend has the Dewalt 735 and he says it requires a vac.

- teejk02

Which Delta do you have? The 22-555? If so, what are your thoughts?

- TheWoodRaccoon

I think it’s a 22-580…have had it for a long time and I doubt it’s available anymore. Was not happy with it (too much spring in the infeed and outfeed tables leading to major snipe) but then I spent the time to fine-tune them and have no complaints since. I did learn to take very thin cuts though.

View geekwoodworker's profile

geekwoodworker

352 posts in 921 days


#12 posted 01-25-2016 01:42 PM

I use a 1.5 hp DC for my shop and always use it on the planer.

To understand snipe check these links http://www.woodcentral.com/bparticles/planer_setup.pdf
http://www.highlandwoodworking.com/understandingsnipe.aspx

Also to flatten boards you could build something like this. http://lumberjocks.com/projects/143266

Enjoy

View TheWoodRaccoon's profile

TheWoodRaccoon

364 posts in 390 days


#13 posted 01-25-2016 02:36 PM

Here is a video by Matthias Wandell that illustrates planer snipe really well:

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=XdDo3OEtjhc

-- still trying to think of a clever signature......

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

4208 posts in 1660 days


#14 posted 01-25-2016 04:26 PM

Brad – when I had some tree stumps ground the shavings had to be cleaned up because they attract termites. Something to think about if you re looking at a pile of shavings in your yard.
- rwe2156

LOL – yeah, I guess if you live in a residential area that is tree starved it might be a concern… but I’m surrounded by several hundred acres of hardwood forest with plenty of stuff for the little buggers to chew on regardless of how much more I may add :)

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

View CharlesA's profile

CharlesA

3019 posts in 1258 days


#15 posted 01-25-2016 04:29 PM

I have to say that one of the reasons I love my dc system is for my planer. I love the fact that 98% of the chips go straight into my barrel and I don’t have to deal with the spray all over the shop. A good planing session produces a lot of chips.

-- "Man is the only animal which devours his own, for I can apply no milder term to the general prey of the rich on the poor." ~Thomas Jefferson

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