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Removing a broken screw

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Forum topic by mramseyISU posted 01-23-2016 11:24 PM 732 views 0 times favorited 18 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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mramseyISU

419 posts in 1012 days


01-23-2016 11:24 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question

Ok now I’m mad. I broke off 3 screws into a box project where the hinge was going to go. First I tried grinding it off flat and using an ez-out that didn’t work it just drifted off to the side every time. Next I tried one of those hollow drills that look like a tiny hole saw to drill around the screw. That worked on one screw but the next two it walked and the teeth snagged on the screw and stripped every one of them out. I’ve got nothing. Any other ideas on how to get these things out. I think the hollow drill would have worked except the teeth are cut for CCW rotation on the drill, if they were CW I could have threw it in my drill press and that would have worked great.

-- Trust me I'm an engineer.


18 replies so far

View MadMark's profile

MadMark

978 posts in 920 days


#1 posted 01-23-2016 11:33 PM

Sand it flat and relocate the hinge slightly.

M

-- Madmark - Madmark2150@yahoo.com Wiretreefarm.com

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AandCstyle

2575 posts in 1724 days


#2 posted 01-23-2016 11:36 PM

MRamsey, sorry that I can’t help you with your current screw challenge. Did you drill a pilot hole and screw in a waxed steel screw before trying attempting to use your brass screws? Did you use a hand screw driver or attempt to use a drill to screw the brass screws in? You might be able to epoxy the broken off heads and the hinge in place, but I have never tried that. Good luck and let us know if you find a great solution because we have all experienced this at one time or another.

-- Art

View distrbd's profile

distrbd

2228 posts in 1913 days


#3 posted 01-23-2016 11:42 PM

move the hinge over to cover the old hole, Mark 3 new holes using an awl, drill 3 pilot holes, drive the screws in without the hinge .the holes are now ready to accept the screws/hinge,now you could confidently drive the screws in knowing the holes have all been already threaded.

-- Ken from Ontario, Canada

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distrbd

2228 posts in 1913 days


#4 posted 01-23-2016 11:45 PM

Art and I must have been typing at the same time,he has valid questions and a great tip about waxing the screws before hand driving them in.

-- Ken from Ontario, Canada

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johnstoneb

2148 posts in 1640 days


#5 posted 01-23-2016 11:47 PM

typical engineer thinking. The hollow drill is set for CCW rotation so it will grab and screw the screw out. Turning clockwise will screw the broken part in farther.

-- Bruce, Boise, ID

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mramseyISU

419 posts in 1012 days


#6 posted 01-24-2016 12:05 AM

I did drill a pilot for all the holes and waxed them up before trying to install them. The box is white oak so it’s not the easiest thing in the world to drive a screw in but I’ve never had screws break off like that before.

Bruce, I realize that CCW would turn the screw out and that’s great for an easy out but it shouldn’t matter when you’re cutting a plug like the hollow drills do. It’d be one thing if grabbing the screw would do something other than knock the teeth off the bit.

I may just have to move them over just a bit and hope for the best.

-- Trust me I'm an engineer.

View bc4393's profile

bc4393

21 posts in 609 days


#7 posted 01-24-2016 02:41 AM

Hard without seeing it but if you cant hide it, I’d chisel it out. (or where you can get ahold of it with pliers and get it out) drill it, plug it and start again. Use soap or wax next time and go slow so it doesn’t heat up the screw. I’ve done that a few times. Mostly because I’m too in a hurry to open the hole up a little bigger and just try to power through what I’m doing and be done. If you can hide it, get a 2 part epoxy to fill the gouged out hole. Something that is workable like wood, just harder than wood filler.

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Aj2

692 posts in 1265 days


#8 posted 01-24-2016 03:13 AM

I fixed broken screws in my boxes by drilling a hole Next to the broken screw and pushing the screw over in the hole.To pull out. After that’s done I drill a bigger hole and glue in a plug for a new screw. Sometimes you just cannot move the hinge without the box looking junkie.

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a1Jim

115206 posts in 3044 days


#9 posted 01-24-2016 04:17 AM

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Slemi

104 posts in 1008 days


#10 posted 01-24-2016 07:29 AM

If You have some solder iron, You can heat the screws to burn wood around them and then easier release them. After that You can drill a hole and plug it with wood and repeat fixing the screws.

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mramseyISU

419 posts in 1012 days


#11 posted 01-24-2016 04:32 PM



These work very well for me.

http://www.woodcraft.com/Product/124210/14-SCREW-EXTRACTOR.aspx?gclid=Cj0KEQiA5oy1BRDQh6Wd572hsfkBEiQAfdTPCgJzoGpC7tP_F6nTu7hwzLrt-2AvBQs4pCvXcBGJH34aAiym8P8HAQ

- a1Jim

I thought those would be the ticket too Jim but here’s what mine looks like after 3 screws. I got one of the 3 out with this.

-- Trust me I'm an engineer.

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a1Jim

115206 posts in 3044 days


#12 posted 01-24-2016 04:38 PM

mramseyISU
That’s strange I’ve used mine a number of times with out problems. Before I bought these I made some out of copper tubing(that’s all I had that would fit) and that even worked,but I did have to keep sharpening it because of the soft metal.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

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mramseyISU

419 posts in 1012 days


#13 posted 01-24-2016 05:10 PM

I think I needed to figure out some way to guide it. The bit wanted to walk and when it did that and hit the screw that’s where the problems happened.

-- Trust me I'm an engineer.

View MT_Stringer's profile

MT_Stringer

2854 posts in 2698 days


#14 posted 01-24-2016 05:13 PM

I don’t know what size your box is, but here is how I replaced a couple of broken screws. Dang hard maple and cheep screws. I broke one screwing it in and the other when removing it!

I used a 1/4 inch plug cutter to cut around the remaining threads. A gentle tug with a screwdriver and out it came. Then I cut the next size repair piece from some scrap and glued it in place. After a little sanding, I installed the hinge with new screws (and a slightly large pilot hole…and some bar soap for lube), and the repair was complete. And no visible evidence of a repair. :-)

Good luck.
Hope this helps.
Mike

Here are some pics and a link to the plug cutter I found at Lowe’s.

-- Handcrafted by Mike Henderson - Channelview, Texas

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a1Jim

115206 posts in 3044 days


#15 posted 01-24-2016 05:30 PM

mramseyISU
Oh I see,I think I just chucked mine in my drill and turned it by hand to get it started and then used the drill. I think you could also put in the right place and tap it with a hammer then remove and repeat until you feel you have it started properly.

Mike has a good idea,that should work great,you still have to be careful starting it.

I guess for those who are reading this there are ways to avoid this problem in the first place ,first buy quality screws,predrill your hole in harder woods,put wax on the threads of the screws before installing them a toilet bowl wax ring is a great source for wax(preferably new:), If you’re using soft screws like brass do all of the previous steps but install a steel screw first of the same size first and remove it, so less stress is put on the brass screw when installed.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

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