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Anyone know how to make an adjustable dough board?

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Forum topic by NY_Rocking_Chairs posted 01-31-2010 03:24 PM 5440 views 0 times favorited 14 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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NY_Rocking_Chairs

507 posts in 3064 days


01-31-2010 03:24 PM

So my sister inquired if I would make her an adjustable dough board.

I told her the rolling pin is no problem and I could easily do a double thickness board, one side is thickness A and flip it over for thickness B, would make it end-grain and it could double as a cutting board.

Just wondering if anyone has any idea how the one for sale there is “adjustable”. My best guess is that one side comes off, the boards slide out and go in a different groove.

Later.

-- Rich, anybody want a peanut?


14 replies so far

View mtkate's profile

mtkate

2049 posts in 2792 days


#1 posted 01-31-2010 03:43 PM

The grooves would have to be 1/8” apart (as those are the increments advertised) but I can’t imagine the board being the adjustable part. If the board itself is one piece, I am wondering if the side bars simply have inserts to make them higher. The other side is supposed to be usable as a cutting board which leads me to believe it’s the sides that move up and down?

Maybe there are biscuits in the pastry board (LOL).

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CaptainSkully

1437 posts in 3025 days


#2 posted 01-31-2010 04:53 PM

What about a flat board and different sized rings to go over the ends? This would actually allow you to use the countertop and lose the board altogether if needed. If you can turn the pin, I wouldn’t think the rings would be too difficult.

-- You can't control the wind, but you can trim your sails

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SteveB

57 posts in 3524 days


#3 posted 01-31-2010 05:02 PM

My guess on how it works:

  • Serrated edges on the board and the frame every eight of an inch. Sorta like finger joints.
  • Threaded rods through the sides so you can disassemble the frame and move it to different slots.

The “adjusted quickly and easily” is marketing-speak for “it’s possible”.

-- Steve B - New Life Home Improvement

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

17674 posts in 3142 days


#4 posted 02-01-2010 01:08 AM

You notice it is square. My guess is 2 sides are for 1/8 and 3/8 and the other 2 are for 1/4 and 1/2. 1/8 is too close to have them all on one set of sides.

-- Bob in WW ~ "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

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Bob Areddy

192 posts in 2869 days


#5 posted 02-01-2010 01:26 AM

Don’t know if this is for the product you’re looking at, but here’s a patent for the same kind of board:
http://www.wikipatents.com/US-Patent-6607187/board-for-rolling-dough/Page-1

What about this idea, however:
Make a board which is supposed to be used on either side. Each opposite rail is a certain height above the board. So on Side A, the rails on the left and right are 1/8” above the board. The rails on the top and bottom are 1/4” above the board… flip the board over, the rails on the right/left are 3/8”, and the rails on the top/bottom are 1/2” (or choose your own heights).

So while the board isn’t adjustable, you could still make it with 4 different heights.

OR, instead of a board which determines the height, what about a rolling pin with replaceable “wheels” that go on the outer edges of the pin which holds the rest of it off of a flat surface?

-- --Bob http://www.areddy.net/wood

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Karson

35035 posts in 3867 days


#6 posted 02-01-2010 01:35 AM

It looks to me that they state you roll it on the diagnal so I’m guessing that the side rails are tapered 1/2 on one corner and 1/8 on the other corner.that you roll across the surface with the rolling pin on the diagional

-- I've been blessed with a father who liked to tinker in wood, and a wife who lets me tinker in wood. Southern Delaware soon moving to Virginia karsonwm@gmail.com †

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

17674 posts in 3142 days


#7 posted 02-01-2010 01:44 AM

That patent may be it. It gives me an idea to have on set of sides dadoed for 1/4 and the other for 1/8. on the opposite side the rails edges could be made higher to give you 1/2 and 3/8. You would have all the slats the same. One set of side rails to give you 1/4 and 1/2 depending on which you used for the top and the same thing for the 1/8 and 3/8 set.

-- Bob in WW ~ "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

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Karson

35035 posts in 3867 days


#8 posted 02-01-2010 01:47 AM

I also see the pegs in the ends (They’re white) I think they are locking screws or cap nuts, The sides could be moved up and down by pulling the pins and then reassembling them. Pins could be in the side board that go into matcvhing holes in the base boards. If there two rows of holes you could have spacing of 1/8” apart .

The screws in the end keep everything all locked together.

-- I've been blessed with a father who liked to tinker in wood, and a wife who lets me tinker in wood. Southern Delaware soon moving to Virginia karsonwm@gmail.com †

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papadan

1178 posts in 2835 days


#9 posted 02-01-2010 01:50 AM

Here is Bobs idea.

-- Carpenter assembles with hands, Designer builds with brains, Artist creates with heart!

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

17674 posts in 3142 days


#10 posted 02-01-2010 01:53 AM

That would be a lot easier than making the adjustable board :-))

-- Bob in WW ~ "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View dennis mitchell's profile

dennis mitchell

3994 posts in 3781 days


#11 posted 02-01-2010 02:03 AM

Maybe board pops out of the frame with a dado on the inside so it is 1/8 and 1/2, top and bottom, then if you flip the board over it becomes 1/4 and 3/8.

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

115202 posts in 3044 days


#12 posted 02-09-2010 08:25 AM

I agree with Bob

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View Derek Lyons's profile

Derek Lyons

584 posts in 3035 days


#13 posted 02-09-2010 08:02 PM

Folks are proposing all kinds of solutions, but let me toss a cook/bakers opinion into the mix….

You can’t have fixed sides with four different heights. Think of this board as a thickness planer with the rolling pin as the ‘cutter head’ – unless the rolling pin is parallel with the board, you aren’t going to get dough of consistent thickness, which is the point of this device after all.

You could have two different heights (that is two parallel sides one height, and the other two at a second) but at the cost of rendering the edges of the lower side that are adjacent to the higher sides somewhat useless because the rolling pin will bump up against the higher edge before reaching the edge of the board. (This is really not desirable as you’ll get a hump of dough in the resulting dead space.) You also can’t use such a board diagonally, which means you can’t properly work your dough.

So all four sides have to be adjustable for this to be really useful.

You can get the same effect by putting some kind of ring around the rolling pin, but many bakers dislike this solution because you have to keep track of a bunch of little parts. (And heaven help you if you have, as I do, multiple rolling pins of different sizes for different uses.)

-- Derek, Bremerton WA --

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MrsN

975 posts in 2992 days


#14 posted 02-10-2010 02:43 AM

My thought would go something like this.

Put some pegs on each side of the rolling surface, make them off center like off to the right side.
Drill corresponding hols into the sides. Since they are off to one side you could drill one set to make a 1/8 & 1/2 set up. flip the sides to drill holes to correspond to the 3/8 & 1/4 side.

Mrs. N

-- ----- www.KNWoodworking.com ----- --

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