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Forum topic by Matt15 posted 01-22-2016 11:00 PM 939 views 0 times favorited 28 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Matt15

14 posts in 407 days


01-22-2016 11:00 PM

Topic tags/keywords: bandsaw blade lathe

So Im in bad need of a new bandsaw blade
and I thought I would give the 3/4” 2/3 vpc
timberwolf blade but ive just relised that they
dont ship to Ireland and I was hoping that
someone here could point me in the direction
of a supplier in the uk

thanks in advance
Matt


28 replies so far

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

4220 posts in 1662 days


#1 posted 01-22-2016 11:10 PM

If you are looking for something for that 10 inch bandsaw you mentioned before, I doubt a 3/4” blade would work. Is that the saw in question or did you get different one?

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

View Matt15's profile

Matt15

14 posts in 407 days


#2 posted 01-22-2016 11:18 PM



If you are looking for something for that 10 inch bandsaw you mentioned before, I doubt a 3/4” blade would work. Is that the saw in question or did you get different one?

Cheers,
Brad

oh god no I saw reality and bought the charnwood W730 14inch bandsaw

Matt

View conifur's profile

conifur

955 posts in 614 days


#3 posted 01-22-2016 11:48 PM

Kudos on your new saw, can it handle the tension needed for a 3/4” blade? Cant help on a supplier, here in the USA. I am Irish though, a Watt.

-- Knowledge and experience equals Wisdom, Michael Frankowski

View Matt15's profile

Matt15

14 posts in 407 days


#4 posted 01-23-2016 01:30 PM


Kudos on your new saw, can it handle the tension needed for a 3/4” blade? Cant help on a supplier, here in the USA. I am Irish though, a Watt.

- conifur

well the manual says blade sizes from 6-19mm which is basically 3/4” so hopefully it can
any suggestions on any other blades for resawing??

-Matt

View GeneralDisorder's profile

GeneralDisorder

45 posts in 803 days


#5 posted 01-23-2016 01:51 PM

I dont think you will benefit with anything over 1/2” on that saw.

View patcollins's profile

patcollins

1420 posts in 2328 days


#6 posted 01-23-2016 01:58 PM

Yea, that don’t go over 1/2 inch.

I pretty much just use 3/8” blades for everything unless I need to cut some sharp curves.

View Kelly's profile

Kelly

1113 posts in 2407 days


#7 posted 01-23-2016 10:04 PM

I’ve a fourteen inch Powermatic and I”m pressing it to run a 5/8” blade. This is not because of the spring tension capacity, but because I run my gullets on the center of the wheel, which allows me to use a stock fence without suffering drift. That puts me fractions of an inch off the back of the saw. Tip it a bit more and it starts running against the cabinet back cover.

Have you ran 3/4” blades on it before? I do well with 1/2” 3 TPI’s at ten inches of material.

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Matt15

14 posts in 407 days


#8 posted 01-23-2016 11:55 PM

well I needed to resaw some 10” oak and anytime I tried oak before I got bad blade drift and literally wrote off the timber.This never happened with any other timber even the likes of mahogany and from what i’ve read a good blade should fix that but today I badly needed the oak so i decided to try cutting it at the slower speed,370m/min instead of 800m/min, I cant say it was a complete success but it did the job so I think im alright for a resaw blade but if anyone has any suggestions of good quality bandsaw blade supplier that’d be much appreciated


I ve a fourteen inch Powermatic and I”m pressing it to run a 5/8” blade. This is not because of the spring tension capacity, but because I run my gullets on the center of the wheel, which allows me to use a stock fence without suffering drift. That puts me fractions of an inch off the back of the saw. Tip it a bit more and it starts running against the cabinet back cover.

Have you ran 3/4” blades on it before? I do well with 1/2” 3 TPI s at ten inches of material.

- Kelly

I also run my blades with the deepest part of the gullet in the center of the wheel and it looks like i still have plenty adjustment in the thrust bearing and plenty of room between the wheel and the covers but i must look into that before I do eventually buy a 3/4” blade
Thank you kelly I would of never thought of that


I dont think you will benefit with anything over 1/2” on that saw.

- GeneralDisorder

why not? I cant see why the saw would accomidate such a blade if it could not run it? Or is there another reason?

Thank you for the response everyone

-Matt

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

4220 posts in 1662 days


#9 posted 01-24-2016 12:21 AM

Couple of thoughts, but first, here is a picture of your saw so others can see what you have:

(Mfg web page is here)

Your saw has two speeds – and the high speed (800m/min which is approx. 2600 sfpm) is typically what most wood cutting bandsaws use (such as the Delta 14” and clones). The slow speed (370m/min or about 1200 sfpm) is typically used for cutting soft metals and plastics. Excessive drift usually is a result of improper tension and/or a dull blade, so I would check that first along with verifying your guide setup.

And no bandsaw thread would be complete without the obligatory bandsaw tune up video link:
Band Saw Clinic with Alex Snodgrass

Being in Ireland, I guess your blade selection is limited… do you have any local suppliers?

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

View Matt15's profile

Matt15

14 posts in 407 days


#10 posted 01-24-2016 12:53 AM



Couple of thoughts, but first, here is a picture of your saw so others can see what you have:

(Mfg web page is here)

Your saw has two speeds – and the high speed (800m/min which is approx. 2600 sfpm) is typically what most wood cutting bandsaws use (such as the Delta 14” and clones). The slow speed (370m/min or about 1200 sfpm) is typically used for cutting soft metals and plastics. Excessive drift usually is a result of improper tension and/or a dull blade, so I would check that first along with verifying your guide setup.

And no bandsaw thread would be complete without the obligatory bandsaw tune up video link:
Band Saw Clinic with Alex Snodgrass

Being in Ireland, I guess your blade selection is limited… do you have any local suppliers?

Cheers,
Brad

- MrUnix

unfortunitly there are no blade suppliers near me as far as I know so that leaves the uk but i cant find any suppliers there either so thats what kinda brings me here hoping that someone here might know of a few.
I actually followed alex’s guide to set up the bandsaw and it works really well most of the time except for oak which I find really strange even though oak is very hard i have managed mahogany with no trouble at all so that leaves me confused as to why oak could be so bad. Ive just read through the manual and it does suggest that you can use the slower speed for very hard woods but ive never seen or heard of anyone doing it?? is it a solution or should i be able to cut all wood with the higher speed ??

-Matt

View TheWoodRaccoon's profile

TheWoodRaccoon

364 posts in 392 days


#11 posted 01-24-2016 05:22 PM

I was reading the Ittura Design catalog, and I learned a few things. At least when it comes to lower end saws, Mr Snodgrass is incorrect when he says “band saw manufacturers know their saws better than anyone”. Mr Ittura wrote in his catalog that he pointed out a huge design flaw in the castings of Delta 14 inch saws, and Delta wasn’t even aware! Though I’m sure the people who make the MiniMax and other high end equipment have higher quality standards and DO in fact know more about their saws, most people don’t have higher end saws.

I’m not stating anything as fact, I’m just saying that Mr Ittura makes a little more sense to me.

-- still trying to think of a clever signature......

View Kelly's profile

Kelly

1113 posts in 2407 days


#12 posted 01-24-2016 06:13 PM

To be fair, Raccoon, companies are peopled by, well, people, so errors are sure to occur. I worked with engineers at Keyport Naval Torpedo Station, a/k/a the Naval Underwater Warfare Engineering Station [NUWES], and Banger Sub Base. Complex equipment, programs and so forth often, had bug that weren’t caught and needed to be worked out.

On the Delta, people had a right to get what they expect, so the company should have (may have) provided fixes for the problems.

I was at the bottom of the food chain, with regard to the engineers, and I, often, caught things, some little, some big, that had escaped their attention.

I think what Snodgrass was trying to get across was, band saws have been being produced for a lot of years (decades) and, for example, if the lower tire needed to be co-planar to the top, one of them would have adjusted assembly for it by now.

My tires are anything but co-planar, but I get veneer cuts, with the right blade, it sharp, proper tension and centering the gullets of the blade on tire.

Of course, there are lemons. Go read a few Amazon and other reviews on various saws and that’s clear.

View patcollins's profile

patcollins

1420 posts in 2328 days


#13 posted 01-25-2016 01:59 AM



I was reading the Ittura Design catalog, and I learned a few things. At least when it comes to lower end saws, Mr Snodgrass is incorrect when he says “band saw manufacturers know their saws better than anyone”. Mr Ittura wrote in his catalog that he pointed out a huge design flaw in the castings of Delta 14 inch saws, and Delta wasn t even aware! Though I m sure the people who make the MiniMax and other high end equipment have higher quality standards and DO in fact know more about their saws, most people don t have higher end saws.

I m not stating anything as fact, I m just saying that Mr Ittura makes a little more sense to me.

- TheWoodRaccoon

So what was this flaw in the castings?

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

4220 posts in 1662 days


#14 posted 01-25-2016 02:07 AM

So what was this flaw in the castings?

Pretty sure he’s talking smack about the tension pivot bracket, of which Ittura sells a more robust replacement for :)

But as Kelly points out… that design was used for a half a dozen decades or more, and it was only a problem if you tried to push the machine past its capabilities, which doesn’t really really constitute a flaw IMO.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

View TheWoodRaccoon's profile

TheWoodRaccoon

364 posts in 392 days


#15 posted 01-25-2016 02:50 AM


So what was this flaw in the castings?

Pretty sure he s talking smack about the tension pivot bracket, of which Ittura sells a more robust replacement for :)

But as Kelly points out… that design was used for a half a dozen decades or more, and it was only a problem if you tried to push the machine past its capabilities, which doesn t really really constitute a flaw IMO.

Cheers,
Brad

- MrUnix

The casting design flaw was the placement of a reinforced section of cast iron on the upper arm. The part where the tensioning rod pushes down on the casting to move the sliding bracket up or down. I read about it in the Ittura Design catalog. So i went over to my Delta 14”, and there it was!

EDIT: This flaw is only present on saws who’s castings were made after the foundry moved to Mexico, but before it was bought by Chang type.

-- still trying to think of a clever signature......

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