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Forum topic by oldwolf posted 1541 days ago 1281 views 0 times favorited 7 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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oldwolf

100 posts in 1760 days


1541 days ago

Topic tags/keywords: question jointer sharpening traditional

I have been working on restoring all my handsaws to full working order, especially several older Disston saws I inherited from my wife’s grandfather after he passed away. Replacing some handles, removing a ton of rust, and now I’m headed down the path to learning to sharpen them. Earlier this week I happened to fall upon a great saw vise in an antique store in town. Just today I was driving the family home from a movie matinee and caught a sign advertising an indoor flea market. . . Well I couldn’t say no to that as I was hoping to get my hands on what I felt was the missing piece before I could really get into sharpening, a saw set. I found one guy selling tools at the market, and he had good prices too, I got a set for 5$, and I also found next to it on the table a saw jointer, so I bought them both. Now I get to looking at the jointer and there are some things about it that just are not intuitive to me. Let me throw up some pics quick.




I get that the screw coming up from the bottom tightens into the file to hold it in place. The part that just doesn’t make sense to me is the top plate, held in place by a screw so it can adjust for something. . . I just can’t imagine what it’s for, without finding this piece I would have just cut a kerf in a piece of wood to use as a jointer but it seemed like such a waste not to rescue this tool from someone’s collectors shelf and put it to work again. Working tools are happy tools!

No name, numbers or marks on the tool, I hope someone out here can fill me in with some info about this jointer and how to use it properly, I tried to do a web search almost all afternoon and could only find this

thank you for all your help

-- Oldwolf - http://insidetheworkshop.blogspot.com/


7 replies so far

View Peter Oxley's profile

Peter Oxley

1425 posts in 2377 days


#1 posted 1541 days ago

I have one of these. My dad worked on a logging crew when he was a kid, and he calls it a “Set”. They used it on big saws – cross-cuts and the like. I’m not totally clear on how it was used, but I think the top plate you mention is to set the rakers.

-- http://www.peteroxley.com -- http://north40studios.etsy.com --

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oldwolf

100 posts in 1760 days


#2 posted 1541 days ago

OK I can see what you are saying, and my mistake in the pics is not offering any reference for the size of the jointer. It’s only 5” wide and 2 1/4” tall. smaller than my opened hand. I have seen the big jointers that you are talking about on the big saws and in relation to what I have seen this jointer is much smaller than those. I have one of those big 2 man saws in my shop, painted as a sign, see here

I don’t think that this tool is taller than the gullets are deep on the saw, and I would think you’d need something larger to register on the blade of the saw for jointing, not mostly on the teeth.

I hope you don’t think I’m discounting you, I really don’t know any specifics, only what I’ve seen in some pictures while researching saw sharpening. Is the one you have really about the size of this one??

I do want to thank you again for your help.

-- Oldwolf - http://insidetheworkshop.blogspot.com/

View Peter Oxley's profile

Peter Oxley

1425 posts in 2377 days


#3 posted 1538 days ago

Nope, mine must be the bigger type, but they look almost exactly alike, so that top plate must serve the same purpose on both. I’ll ask my dad to explain it to me again and I’ll get back to you.

-- http://www.peteroxley.com -- http://north40studios.etsy.com --

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oldwolf

100 posts in 1760 days


#4 posted 1535 days ago

cool! Thanks for your help Peter. I can’t wait to hear what he has to say.

thank you

-- Oldwolf - http://insidetheworkshop.blogspot.com/

View Peter Oxley's profile

Peter Oxley

1425 posts in 2377 days


#5 posted 1500 days ago

Oldwolf – sorry it’s taken me so long to follow up on this. This is how my dad explained it to me …

The plate in question moves in and out as the screw is tightened or loosened. On either side of the plate are ledges. If you turn the blade so the teeth are pointing up (as in sharpening), you can set the ledges on the teeth and one or more of the teeth or rakers will pass into the slot on the plate. When properly adjusted (flush for teeth or slightly recessed for rakers), any tooth or raker that protrudes through the plate is filed down to maintain equal and correct height.

I don’t know if it will help with your research, but mine is marked as follows:

ATKINS & CO
IND’P’LS IND
PAT
MAY 5 74
JUN 75
AU 81
JA 88

-- http://www.peteroxley.com -- http://north40studios.etsy.com --

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oldwolf

100 posts in 1760 days


#6 posted 1500 days ago

Oh, that makes sense… I can really se how that would work on a larger saw blade.

I can tell you from practice it works very well just to hold a file and joint a regular handsaw as well :) That will help me as I am building a set up to perform hand tool woodworking in front of the public at Renaissance Faires for crowds, It’s conceivable that I would have to sharpen a saw on the go and I would get asked about specifics of the joiner. This at least helps me understand and explain.

I appreciate the extra effort here Peter, Thank you so much for going the extra mile. The understanding was worth the short wait. And please tell your father I said Thank You as well.

Oldwolf

-- Oldwolf - http://insidetheworkshop.blogspot.com/

View araldite's profile

araldite

187 posts in 1907 days


#7 posted 1500 days ago

Ya know, it’s funny, I have one that looks a lot like it and I had no idea what it was. I bought a saw on Ebay and the seller threw it in for nothing. I was wondering what it was and it’s just been sitting in my shop collecting dust. Mine says “Disston USA Pat’d Nov. 9, 1916”. Now at least I know what it is. Thanks.

-- Failure is the road to success if you learn to learn from your mistakes - Vince, Greenville, SC

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