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Best Router bit for surfacing slabs?

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Forum topic by WhiskeyCreek posted 01-21-2016 08:55 PM 1467 views 0 times favorited 12 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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WhiskeyCreek

16 posts in 844 days


01-21-2016 08:55 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question trick tip milling joining router

What is the best type of router bit to use for surface planing slabs, without paying for specialty planing bits? Straight bit, mortising bit, rabbet bits?

-- Whiskey Creek Woodmill & Co.


12 replies so far

View MadMark's profile

MadMark

979 posts in 1144 days


#1 posted 01-21-2016 09:10 PM

None. This job calls for a planer or sander or if all else fails, a hand plane.

If you are talking about an inlay mortise, the yes, a router is the tool. For surface planing, no.

M

-- Madmark - Madmark2150@yahoo.com Wiretreefarm.com

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WhiskeyCreek

16 posts in 844 days


#2 posted 01-21-2016 09:16 PM

I surface plane very successfully with a router and sled all the time. I wish I had a planer and wide belt sander big enough for 11’ slabs, but that’s far fetched. I just don’t want to pay for a $200 Amana bit or comparable bits and am looking for the next best bit.

Anybody have experience with the magnate bits?

-- Whiskey Creek Woodmill & Co.

View Tennessee's profile

Tennessee

2512 posts in 2205 days


#3 posted 01-21-2016 09:22 PM

My experience is that over time, you have to realize that you have spent maybe $200-300 on bits that wear out, when for the same money you could have a good used planer off CL, or add another hundred and get a new planer.

-- Tsunami Guitars and Custom Woodworking, Cleveland, TN

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chrisstef

16577 posts in 2697 days


#4 posted 01-21-2016 09:25 PM

Ive used a bowl bit with decent results but it still required a good amount of sanding. Wide slabs can be a real bear to flatten.

-- Something, something, something.

View Gixxerjoe04's profile

Gixxerjoe04

849 posts in 1267 days


#5 posted 01-21-2016 09:25 PM

This is what I bought to do some, still haven’t had the time to use it but has good reviews.
http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0006B0QX4?psc=1&redirect=true&ref_=oh_aui_detailpage_o00_s00

If I planned on doing a lot of flattening a lot of slabs, I’d probably go with one of those expensive bit with multiple square carbide bits. Of course with the square bottom type ones I’ve heard it leaving the lines with every pass, so some people use a big bowl bottom bit.

View SASmith               's profile

SASmith

1850 posts in 2678 days


#6 posted 01-21-2016 09:28 PM

I used the 1 1/2 inch bit from here to flatten a butcher block table:

A bowl bit would work equally well, I think.

Click for details

-- Scott Smith, Southern Illinois

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Gixxerjoe04

849 posts in 1267 days


#7 posted 01-21-2016 09:30 PM



My experience is that over time, you have to realize that you have spent maybe $200-300 on bits that wear out, when for the same money you could have a good used planer off CL, or add another hundred and get a new planer.

- Tennessee

Yea but he’s talking about slabs, most of which are too wide for mostly planers and def jointers, unless you have a huge bank account that is and space.

View shampeon's profile

shampeon

1775 posts in 1874 days


#8 posted 01-21-2016 09:34 PM

I’m going to use a bowl bit, like Stef sez. It’d be great to buy a 7HP 30” industrial planer to handle a 24” wide 200+ lb. slab, but for some people, that’s just not practical.

-- ian | "You can't stop what's coming. It ain't all waiting on you. That's vanity."

View HokieKen's profile

HokieKen

3328 posts in 829 days


#9 posted 01-21-2016 09:53 PM

I bought this one for flattening a slab. Never got around to building a sled but I have used the bit to form half lap joints and tenons and it works great. Leaves a sharp corner and smooth finish. I’ve definitely got my $s worth out of it. If you’re doing large slabs, you might want one a little bigger though.

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

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Ger21

1074 posts in 2822 days


#10 posted 01-21-2016 11:50 PM

Any large diameter carbide tipped straight bit will work.

-- Gerry, http://www.thecncwoodworker.com/index.html http://www.jointcam.com

View AandCstyle's profile

AandCstyle

2779 posts in 1948 days


#11 posted 01-22-2016 12:18 AM

Here is a link to a jig you can use, but you may already have one. I have been satisfied with the one Magnate router bit I bought. Get the biggest diameter bit you can find because an eleven foot slab will require a lot of passes. The bottom cleaning bit Scott suggested would be a good one.

-- Art

View stan3443's profile

stan3443

295 posts in 1966 days


#12 posted 01-22-2016 01:05 AM

The Magnate bits are very good they are a true flat bottom bit most bowl bits have a 1deg angle . They go up to 2.75 dia. make shure you have the power to spin it

-- If your not supposed to have hair on your face......why does it grow their

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