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Need best long term idea for having Planer table smooth and glide nice

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Forum topic by stoutrugby posted 01-21-2016 04:45 PM 1320 views 0 times favorited 17 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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stoutrugby

6 posts in 320 days


01-21-2016 04:45 PM

Topic tags/keywords: planer table top lubrication friction

I have a 20” Powermatic Planer and I wanted to know what everyone’s thoughts are on the best coating for long term lubrication on the table. I’ve heard wax is bad due to friction/heat build up and then it slows parts down.

I know GlideCote formally knows as TopCote works well, but I wanted to see if there is something else out there that doesn’t need to be applied as often.

Thanks for any input,
Tracy


17 replies so far

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MadMark

977 posts in 916 days


#1 posted 01-21-2016 05:57 PM

Johnson’s Paste Wax is what I use on everything. You want to be careful with any silicon based lube as this will poison the surface againt finishing. Your poly will convert to orange peel at the slightest trace. Wax works and doesn’t contaminate finishing.

M

-- Madmark - Madmark2150@yahoo.com Wiretreefarm.com

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HokieKen

1752 posts in 602 days


#2 posted 01-21-2016 06:29 PM

Put me down for Johnson’s too. I put formica on my planer tables but I have paste wax on my table saw and bandsaw tables and have never had any issue with friction. Quite the opposite.

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

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MrUnix

4224 posts in 1662 days


#3 posted 01-21-2016 06:38 PM

have a 20” Powermatic Planer and I wanted to know what everyone s thoughts are on the best coating for long term lubrication on the table. I’ve heard wax is bad due to friction/heat build up and then it slows parts down.
- stoutrugby

Where did you hear that?!? The most common treatment is paste wax. And the manual for the PM 20 inch planer even says:

The table should be kept clean and free of rust. Some users prefer a paste wax coating. Another option is talcum powder applied with a blackboard eraser rubbed in vigorously once a week; this will fill casting pores and form a moisture barrier.

I’ve used paste wax for decades, along with keeping the table surfaces covered when not in use. Never had a rust problem even in the worst humidity/conditions – and it makes stock glide over them easier, not harder, and I’ve certainly never experienced it to cause friction/heat!

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

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AandCstyle

2569 posts in 1720 days


#4 posted 01-22-2016 12:33 AM

Tracy, another happy Johnson’s paste wax user here. You could also look at Boeshield T-9.

-- Art

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builtinbkyn

651 posts in 404 days


#5 posted 01-22-2016 12:36 AM

Wax. Oh, I see it’s already been mentioned ;)

-- Bill, Yo!......in Brooklyn :)

View gfadvm's profile

gfadvm

14940 posts in 2153 days


#6 posted 01-22-2016 01:47 AM

I use paste wax on my big planer and it works great.

Never heard of the talcum powder thing. Interesting. It sure makes it easier to pull my boots on!

-- " I'll try to be nicer, if you'll try to be smarter" gfadvm

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JBrow

818 posts in 383 days


#7 posted 01-22-2016 01:57 AM

stoutrugby,

I use Minwax paste wax on my Woodmaster planer bed. I have had no problems other than having to re-apply wax on a regular basis.

Since I do not like applying the wax (just too much trouble), I will be giving serious thought to a planer bed upgrade to my Woodmaster 12” planer. Woodmaster Tools offers a polypropolene polymer surface that is 1/2-inch thick and mounts on top of their planer beds. Woodmaster claims this planer bed accessory reduces friction by 70%, increases roller life, and increases feed motor performance. It is supplied with two poly guide rails and mounting hardware. They want $289 for this bed cover for their 25” wide planer. This product is at:

http://www.woodmastertools.com/NS/accessdetail.cfm?PID=60

I did a quick search of the internet and found a .500” x 24” x 48” sheet of Natural Polypropylene Stress Relieved Sheet for $59 from Ridout Plastics Co. Inc. They also offer a straight line cut of the sheet for an additional charge of $18. This company is found at:

http://www.eplastics.com/Plastic/polypropylene_sheet/PRONAT0-500SR24X48

Since I am not yet ready to upgrade, I have not contacted Woodmaster to determine why they are charging such a premium. Nor do I know whether Woodmaster’s product and that of Ridout Plastic is the same material. There may be more to this slick surface than meets the eye. But at this time, ending the routine of regularly waxing the planer bed is pretty attractive to me.

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gfadvm

14940 posts in 2153 days


#8 posted 01-22-2016 02:06 AM

JBrow, I wax my Woodmaster with a piece of Scotch Brite pad rubbed in paste wax and do not buff it off. This is really quick and has never caused a problem with the boards being planed.

-- " I'll try to be nicer, if you'll try to be smarter" gfadvm

View TheFridge's profile

TheFridge

5765 posts in 949 days


#9 posted 01-22-2016 02:32 AM

I leave a rag in the JPW can. Occasionally, I actually have to turn the crank on the planer to wax the bed. Aside from that. 2-5 minutes a week maybe for upkeep. On all tools.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

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JBrow

818 posts in 383 days


#10 posted 01-22-2016 03:04 AM

gfadvm,

Thanks for the tip. I’ll give the Scotch Brite pad try. I assume you use the Scotch Brite pad on your other cast iron?

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gfadvm

14940 posts in 2153 days


#11 posted 01-22-2016 03:52 AM

Yep, I use the same process on all the cast iron surfaces. Leaving the wax rather than buffing makes this quick and easy. They will hold a lot of wax and they are abrasive enough to remove sap and light surface rust. I leave a square of it in the wax can.

Edit: I use the grey pads or the green ones (don’t think that’s important though). They will get black and nasty but just keep using them.

-- " I'll try to be nicer, if you'll try to be smarter" gfadvm

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stoutrugby

6 posts in 320 days


#12 posted 01-22-2016 05:27 PM

Thanks to everyone with the helpful insight. I do have to tell you the Bostik GlideCote is nice, but I’ll go buy some of the Johnson paste wax and give it a fair shake before committing.

Thanks again and have a great weekend.

View ErnestP's profile

ErnestP

14 posts in 375 days


#13 posted 01-23-2016 01:26 AM

If your intent is less effort, get a can of Glide Coat/Dri-Glide, etc.
It is a teflon-based spray, on a super volatile carrier.
Spray, polish briefly and you’re good to go, for quite awhile.

It wears really well, about 3-4x a wax finish (imo).
It is crazy expensive, at about $20 a can, but it goes a long way.

Otherwise, my favorite wax brand is Trewax (I think it lasts longer).
It can be hard to find, though Brewax is a close second.
The plus side to Johnson’s, you can find anywhere…cheap.
Basically, any wax will serve, given regular use.

The caution on the use of silicon-based solutions, is also ‘spot-on’.
They can contaminate the wood, requiring extra effort to avoid finish problems.
So, with wax and teflon spray available, I would steer clear of the possibility.

Ern

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

2406 posts in 1772 days


#14 posted 01-23-2016 03:47 AM

I’ve heard wax is bad due to friction/heat build up and then it slows parts down.

That has to be one of the most WRONG things I heard in a long time.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View JoeinGa's profile

JoeinGa

7481 posts in 1470 days


#15 posted 01-23-2016 01:03 PM

Hmmmm, 14 answers and no one has mentioned Johnsons Paste Wax yet? Geeze, I thought everybody used wax on their tools.
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-- Perform A Random Act Of Kindness Today ... Pay It Forward

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