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Forum topic by Partridge posted 11-12-2007 09:35 PM 1562 views 0 times favorited 14 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Partridge

296 posts in 4043 days


11-12-2007 09:35 PM

I am looking for a good rout table setup..as far as router and lift or is there a good one that is combined
I thought i had a good one (Freud 2200e) but am disappointed in function in a table set up.

I started making a router table top out of a solid core door(3’x6’9) will be cut down late. This table will double as a out feed table for my TS and a work bench for now. I cut a hole for a plate for router to mount to and put T-track in for my fence and mounted th fence. I went to line up the plate on my router, to drill holes to mount up … It just was not working out. I all so tried to envision it in the table. It did not seem very table freindly to me.

I need to get some thing that is going to work.

help?????

-- I get out in the shop when I can


14 replies so far

View Lee A. Jesberger's profile

Lee A. Jesberger

6860 posts in 4066 days


#1 posted 11-12-2007 09:54 PM

Hi Partridge,

Something to keep in mind when building any router table is the substrate you are mounting the router to.

If your adding this to the table board extension on your table saw, you most likely too much flexing in the 3/4” melamine surface. especially if you recess the router base into it so the router base is flush with the surface.

Also, when I was using a router table, instead of a shaper, I made a new base for my router out of 1/4” plexiglass.

I was using incra accessories that require extreme accuracy. Mt router table top is 1 1/2” thick, covered with a plastic laminate. The recess in the top was about 12” square, as was the mating base for the router. This made
inserting and removing very easy. That helped with changing bits, as well as cleaning out the sawdust.

The plexiglass would flex just enought to throw the accuracy required out the window. I replaced that with 1/4” aluminum, which solve the problem.

Also making a split fence system, as those found on a shaper is very handy. They are not difficult to make and will allow you to make a dust collection connection that is very effective.

If you would like I will post pictures on the fence I made. The original design came from frued, but I altered it.

Using that fence system, I avoided buying a shaper for about fifteen years, and mage hundreds of raised panel cabinet doors with it, as well as thousands of feet of molding.

Have fun;

Lee

-- by Lee A. Jesberger http://www.prowoodworkingtips.com http://www.ezee-feed.com

View ben's profile

ben

158 posts in 3957 days


#2 posted 11-13-2007 01:36 AM

Lee—would this be true of any 3/4” surface, or when you mention melamine are you assuming particle board underneath? I built a small table from 3/4” MDF that has 2×1 wide supports under the table making a 8×8” square (roughly). So far I have never found any flex, although I do try to remove the router when not using it (this is a portable table that I set on top of a wheeled cart). Should I expect it to flex as well?

Partridge—if it’s useful I can post pics of mine, but it’s free standing and small, so the design would be quite different from yours.

View Lee A. Jesberger's profile

Lee A. Jesberger

6860 posts in 4066 days


#3 posted 11-21-2007 01:25 PM

Hi Ben;

On a small square like that, I don’t think you’ll have a problem, especially with the frame below.

Lee

-- by Lee A. Jesberger http://www.prowoodworkingtips.com http://www.ezee-feed.com

View miles125's profile

miles125

2180 posts in 4092 days


#4 posted 11-21-2007 01:52 PM

My router table is simply an approx 18×18 x 12” tall box that i clamp on my work bench when i want to use it. I have an overhang on the top so i can pretty much clamp any kind of fence configuration i need to it. Sure a big honkin table would be nice sometimes….But they also take up some big honkin space!

-- "The way to make a small fortune in woodworking- start with a large one"

View Alex Lane's profile

Alex Lane

512 posts in 3977 days


#5 posted 11-21-2007 02:17 PM

Lee, where do you get the 1.5” thick melamine board for the router table? I’ve looked, and looked, and looked…online and at kitchen shops, and no one has ANY!! I would love to find some of this stuff to make a better router table for myself and not have to worry about it being non-flat. OR DO YOU THINK I need a torsion box under some 3/4” board?

-- Lane Custom Guitars and Basses

View Thos. Angle's profile

Thos. Angle

4444 posts in 4049 days


#6 posted 11-21-2007 02:58 PM

I use a Bosch 1617? router mounted in a Jessom FX lift. I’ve beat the crap out of these for a couple years and can recommend them both . I do need to build a new table top. I’ll use two layers of particle board and surround it with laminate with a wood edge. I have 3/4 inch angle iron under mine to hold it straight. I think when I build new I will switch to the Jessom Master lift and the 3 1/4 horse PC. I also need a shaper. My table is 24×42.

-- Thos. Angle, Jordan Valley, Oregon

View Partridge's profile

Partridge

296 posts in 4043 days


#7 posted 11-21-2007 06:05 PM

thank you for your comment.
I did get a new router(porter cable 3 1/4hp ) and lift(woodpecker) . I plunged the old plate hole with 3/4 oak and routed out the new hole. I have not had time to uses it but, it is ready and waiting for me.

-- I get out in the shop when I can

View Blake's profile

Blake

3443 posts in 3961 days


#8 posted 11-21-2007 06:22 PM

I have the Bosch 1617 like Thos. I love that router. It was a kit with the plunge base and fixed base. The height adjustment for the fixed base has a built-in above-the-table adjustment hole so if you drill a hole in your router table plate you can fine-tune bit height with an allen wrench. If you can’t afford a lift this is a great feature. I usually leave the fixed base attached to the plate in the table and just switch the motor to the plunge base when I need mobility.

My model also has soft start and variable speed. All in all I think it is well designed and a great medium-duty router for the hobby woodworker, and plenty powerful for most folks.

-- Happy woodworking!

View Partridge's profile

Partridge

296 posts in 4043 days


#9 posted 11-21-2007 06:43 PM

i do only have a night maybe two a week and a day on weakened and when your tools do not work.. It is a real time killer. next project is to adjust my new jointer (Rikon 6”) and fine tune the tables on my Ridged Planer to minimize snipe.

next tool will have to be TS… there is always Santa…

-- I get out in the shop when I can

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Blake

3443 posts in 3961 days


#10 posted 11-21-2007 06:49 PM

Make sure you have a big chimney if you want a table saw from Santa… and be sure to leave lots of cookies.

-- Happy woodworking!

View Thos. Angle's profile

Thos. Angle

4444 posts in 4049 days


#11 posted 11-21-2007 07:29 PM

Lots of cookies!!!

-- Thos. Angle, Jordan Valley, Oregon

View Partridge's profile

Partridge

296 posts in 4043 days


#12 posted 11-21-2007 08:41 PM

I do not want it in the house shop is fine …. and Santa can take it thought the 10f wide over head door. just in case I am going to clean out a spot i shop so Santa as no problems

as for the cookies,, I will have my wife make two batches one to leave in shop and one to leave in house.

-- I get out in the shop when I can

View Thos. Angle's profile

Thos. Angle

4444 posts in 4049 days


#13 posted 11-21-2007 09:13 PM

good idea

-- Thos. Angle, Jordan Valley, Oregon

View Lee A. Jesberger's profile

Lee A. Jesberger

6860 posts in 4066 days


#14 posted 12-13-2007 05:34 AM

Hi all;

In the post above I made a few errors. I mixed up two of the router tops we had been using. The heavier duty model is better described below.

The top is 1 1/2” thick pine, with laminate on top and bottom. 1×2 ’s glued on edge. I didn’t make it, somebody gave it to me.

Even with a miter slot and a fairly deep recess cut into the underside for the router base, it remained flat. reason for the recess being deep was to allow the router bits to penetrate the top enough to make them usable. The screws used for the plastic base were replaced with longer ones, and were recessed into the top. These screws held the router in place. The router is a 3 H.P. Hitachi plunge router with the plunge springs removed. This made adjusting it mush easier.

For the miter gauge slot I rabited a 1×4 piece of teak into it, then rabited a miter gauge slot into that. The oils in the teak kept it sliding easilly and it never warped.

I guess I have to write something about the table with the 1/4” plate of aluminum.

Sorry for the screw up.

Lee

-- by Lee A. Jesberger http://www.prowoodworkingtips.com http://www.ezee-feed.com

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