LumberJocks

Questions about refinishing doors

  • Advertise with us

« back to Finishing forum

Forum topic by tealetm posted 01-20-2016 06:22 PM 461 views 0 times favorited 12 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View tealetm's profile

tealetm

61 posts in 324 days


01-20-2016 06:22 PM

Hi all- I’m new to this website and am looking for some help.

To give a short backstory, I recently purchased my first house just outside of Albany, NY. The original part of the house is late 1800’s, but the part I’m working on is newer (I’m unsure of age of the addition). So after gutting the soon to be dining room (major structural work) I’m now into the finishing stages.

I’ve been stripping a set of doors that lead into the dining room. The doors are very nicely made and I’d like to stain them, while keeping all the other trim in the room painted. I’ll eventually do a pine beadboard wainscot, and think I’ll stain the beadboard and paint the baseboard/chairrail.

So my #1 question is: Can anybody identify what wood the doors are made of?

And my #2 questions is: If I stain over paint that is left behind (hard to get, rounded areas), will it look ok or am I inviting problems? What type of stain would you recommend, I’m assuming i would use a top coat of something to make it durable). As I mentioned, I’d like to have the pine beadboard somewhat match the doors.

Thanks for your help!!


12 replies so far

View SirIrb's profile

SirIrb

1239 posts in 697 days


#1 posted 01-20-2016 06:49 PM

Id need some better closeups but my gut says Doug Fir, My eye says Cherry.

Going with my gut till more pics are posted.

I dont think you will have a problem with stain other than it not being able to penetrate past the paint. Aesthetically I would say to repaint them or get all the paint off.

-- Don't blame me, I voted for no one.

View tealetm's profile

tealetm

61 posts in 324 days


#2 posted 01-20-2016 07:23 PM

I don’t think that they are cherry, but I’m not an expert…

The remaining paint is just in some of the detail work, I’ve used several strippers and its just not coming off. I’ve done distressed looking projects before where you stain, then paint and sand and it looks good, I just didn’t know if it worked the other way around or if it would look half done.

This is the only other photo i have on me. The stripper that worked the best on the paint (and was also the most expensive…) darkened the wood, and this is before I detail sanded it.

Before I do anything- should i do something with the joints that have opened up a little bit? Overall the doors are in excellent condition but there are two or three joints that have opened up like this one.

View SirIrb's profile

SirIrb

1239 posts in 697 days


#3 posted 01-20-2016 07:35 PM

Doug Fir. Im sold.

You could blow glue in them and clamp them. Use a compressor.

-- Don't blame me, I voted for no one.

View tealetm's profile

tealetm

61 posts in 324 days


#4 posted 01-21-2016 09:06 PM

So what about a finish like this? GOLDEN SPIKE RAILROAD VARNISH

I’ve seen this product used on floors and they came out great. I’m not a finish expert (yet) so I need to do my research.

View tealetm's profile

tealetm

61 posts in 324 days


#5 posted 01-26-2016 04:18 PM

Wainscotting is going up and looking good. Trim is just mocked in place.

I ordered the varnish listed above and will do all the pine prior to putting the trim in.

Any need for anything on the pine prior to coats of varnish? Depending on color, I may not stain.

View tealetm's profile

tealetm

61 posts in 324 days


#6 posted 02-02-2016 07:14 PM

Well, the stain and varnish is on. A conditioner and two coats of stain for both the doors and the wainscot, followed by two coats of Golden Spike Railroad Varnish.

The wainscotting turned out great, but I’m rather dissapointed with the door. Its blotchy due to the wood type and the little bit of leftover paint was too much. Oh well, it doesn’t look bad but I just wanted better for the amount of time I put into it.

The varnish is great and I’d highly recommend it to anybody looking to try a new finish.

View HokieKen's profile

HokieKen

1807 posts in 605 days


#7 posted 02-02-2016 07:54 PM

Everything looks good and is coming along nicely.

Today is the first time I’ve seen this thread and just had to chime in because I have the same Christmas Story lamp window film! I got a good laugh when I saw it in the first pic :P Great taste in furnishings and decor!

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

View tealetm's profile

tealetm

61 posts in 324 days


#8 posted 02-02-2016 07:56 PM

The window film is hilarious not only because of the movie, but because its a cheap way to show it off! From the outside it really does look like a giant lamp inside your house.

View dhazelton's profile

dhazelton

2326 posts in 1763 days


#9 posted 02-02-2016 09:46 PM

Did you use a sanding sealer or prestain conditioner before you stained them? That helps with blotchiness on soft woods.

View tealetm's profile

tealetm

61 posts in 324 days


#10 posted 02-02-2016 09:50 PM

Yes, I used Minwax pre-stain conditioner. It made a difference on the pine beadboard and I was happy with it there but on the doors it didn’t seem to do much.

View dhazelton's profile

dhazelton

2326 posts in 1763 days


#11 posted 02-03-2016 02:07 AM

Sometimes things were built to be paint grade. Can’t beat yourself up over it. Overall effect when the room is done is all that matters.

View sras's profile

sras

4392 posts in 2596 days


#12 posted 02-03-2016 03:14 AM

Just remember, you’re going to see defects that no one else will notice. Sometimes even after you try to point them out!

-- Steve - Impatience is Expensive

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com