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Auto OFF switch for shop appliance?

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Forum topic by mdoleman posted 01-19-2016 05:22 PM 747 views 1 time favorited 16 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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mdoleman

36 posts in 332 days


01-19-2016 05:22 PM

In a previous thread I was asking all about dust collectors vs. shop vacs and, of course, my intention is to configure things such that the dust solution is plugged to power-up automatically when plugged-in tools are activated…

I am very limited on amp capacity out to my detached workshop, and desperately wish to avoid the expense & hassle of running an additional circuit. But in the Wintertime I do need a bit of light heating out there, and electric heat is the most convenient (I’d looked into some form of propane or kerosene solution, but the drawbacks to either are too great).

Anyway…

What I am wondering is whether there is such a thing as an auto switching plug that does the opposite of a vacuum trigger: i.e., shuts-off power to an appliance when a tool is turned-on. I’d like to plug an overhead quartz heater into such a unit, if possible. I know that I’m still going to be facing the fact that the wires might not have time to really cool enough, and I’ll still trip the breaker. But I think it would at least take the additional load off and perhaps allow me to work without that constant nagging fear that I’m about to lose power.

I’ve also seen overhead heaters that operate via pull-chain, and I’m okay with something like that. But it’d be nice if the solution could be automated.

Thanks.


16 replies so far

View conifur's profile

conifur

955 posts in 619 days


#1 posted 01-19-2016 05:44 PM

How about a remote switch, I use one for my DC, the key bob hangs on my belt loop and I push the button to start or stop it, got mine for 15$, just have to check it for amperage that it can handle.

-- Knowledge and experience equals Wisdom, Michael Frankowski

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MadMark

978 posts in 920 days


#2 posted 01-19-2016 06:14 PM

Wire a 4×4 wiring box with a 3-way switch and a standard duplex outlet with the hot link removed. Wire neutral & ground to outlet per normal. Run feed hot to common on switch. Each switch leg wires separately to one hot on outlet. This will give you an opposite switch where one outlet feeds the heater & the other the dc. Parts s/b $20 or so at your local home center.

M

-- Madmark - Madmark2150@yahoo.com Wiretreefarm.com

View mdoleman's profile

mdoleman

36 posts in 332 days


#3 posted 01-19-2016 09:33 PM

Well, I love this:


Wire a 4×4 wiring box with a 3-way switch and a standard duplex outlet with the hot link removed. Wire neutral & ground to outlet per normal. Run feed hot to common on switch. Each switch leg wires separately to one hot on outlet. This will give you an opposite switch where one outlet feeds the heater & the other the dc. Parts s/b $20 or so at your local home center.

If I had a diagram I might even understand it… Sounds like exactly what I want, but without seeing an actual wiring diagram, I don’t stand a chance of actually executing it. I’m one of those “visual learners.”

View HokieKen's profile

HokieKen

1812 posts in 606 days


#4 posted 01-19-2016 11:13 PM

I tried a quick search for a diagram but couldn’t find one showing what Mark is talking about. I don’t have access to anything but iPad right now so I just scribbled this out. If this doesn’t clear it up, let me know and I’ll draw a proper diagram on my desktop tomorrow.

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

View mdoleman's profile

mdoleman

36 posts in 332 days


#5 posted 01-19-2016 11:19 PM

Holy smoke, you rock. Thanks for that! I think I can probably decypher that, yes!

View MadMark's profile

MadMark

978 posts in 920 days


#6 posted 01-20-2016 12:03 AM

HokieKen tyvm! Lol

M

-- Madmark - Madmark2150@yahoo.com Wiretreefarm.com

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HokieKen

1812 posts in 606 days


#7 posted 01-20-2016 02:31 PM

Here’s a better schematic. Sorry but that chicken scratch I posted last night was just buggin’ me :P

FWIW, if you are using seperate boxes for the switch and outlet, and you want it to be to code, you’ll have to run the neutral through the switch box. NEC requires all switch boxes to have available neutral. So you’ll need 2 wire cable coming to the switch and 3 wire cable going from the switch to the outlet. If you’re putting both in the same box, just ignore this paragraph.


HokieKen tyvm! Lol

M

- MadMark

Been a while since I had to google an acronym but that the first time I’ve seen tyvm! Learn something new every day… And, ywvm ;)

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

115207 posts in 3045 days


#8 posted 01-20-2016 02:46 PM

View mdoleman's profile

mdoleman

36 posts in 332 days


#9 posted 01-20-2016 03:08 PM

Man, thanks SO much for all the amazing input on this! What a great forum. I really do appreciate all the help, and I do believe that lovely schematic up there will find its way implemented in my garage this very weekend. :-)

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

17677 posts in 3143 days


#10 posted 01-21-2016 05:22 AM

It could easily be done with a normally closed contact on a relay that operates to start your dust collector. Probably a little deeper into wiring than you really want to get ;-)

-- Bob in WW ~ "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View TheFridge's profile

TheFridge

5765 posts in 953 days


#11 posted 01-21-2016 05:27 AM

On the 3 way: black screw common and the brass screws are the 2 travelers.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

View MadMark's profile

MadMark

978 posts in 920 days


#12 posted 01-21-2016 05:37 AM

Adding a relay creates a mounting issue, the original should fit in a 4×4 J-box.

M

-- Madmark - Madmark2150@yahoo.com Wiretreefarm.com

View HokieKen's profile

HokieKen

1812 posts in 606 days


#13 posted 01-21-2016 12:15 PM

Yeah, that’s spam^


It could easily be done with a normally closed contact on a relay that operates to start your dust collector. Probably a little deeper into wiring than you really want to get ;-)

- TopamaxSurvivor

That was my initial thought but MadMark beat me to the first post and I liked his solution better. Cheaper and easier. And relays go bad in my experience. But that’s definitely another working plan.

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

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TopamaxSurvivor

17677 posts in 3143 days


#14 posted 01-22-2016 08:17 AM

Definitely cheaper and easier, but not automatic as requested. ;-( If an automatic version were not done correctly, the there is a good chance the heater load would still be on long enough for the first few cycles of motor startup current to trip the breaker. That would get a little annoying very quickly ;-))

-- Bob in WW ~ "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View HokieKen's profile

HokieKen

1812 posts in 606 days


#15 posted 01-22-2016 12:36 PM



Definitely cheaper and easier, but not automatic as requested. ;-( If an automatic version were not done correctly, the there is a good chance the heater load would still be on long enough for the first few cycles of motor startup current to trip the breaker. That would get a little annoying very quickly ;-))

- TopamaxSurvivor

It automatically disconnects the heater… when you flip the switch ;P

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

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