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Hollow legs.

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Forum topic by 716 posted 01-18-2016 07:30 PM 909 views 0 times favorited 28 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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716

502 posts in 379 days


01-18-2016 07:30 PM

I want to make a piece of furniture that requires some thick legs. I want to save some material and make them from a 4/4 boards beveled at 45 degrees hollow inside. Would I be better to fill the empty space inside with some filler, for example expandable foam that is used for window frame sealing to give it a bit more substance (not to sound as a drum when knocking on it) ?

-- It's nice!


28 replies so far

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

3933 posts in 1955 days


#1 posted 01-18-2016 07:37 PM

I wouldn’t, but you can test them easily. Make them without the foam, and see if they have the drumming effect you want to avoid. I’ve have them on some heavy stuff and didn’t see any drumming (like a pool table), but then no one was tapping on them loudly, either. But if they do have an objectionable noise, you could go back and fill them later.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

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716

502 posts in 379 days


#2 posted 01-18-2016 08:26 PM

I guess I can cut a dado inside every foot or so and insert a piece of thick plywood. That should besides limiting drummines make them stronger and easier to glue.

-- It's nice!

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

2406 posts in 1771 days


#3 posted 01-18-2016 08:31 PM

I didn’t know people went around knocking on table legs. I guess you learn some new everyday.

If you think that’s going to be a problem….........................................................

http://www.woodworkersjournal.com/quad-linear-legs-stickler-inspired-settle/

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

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jdh122

879 posts in 2280 days


#4 posted 01-18-2016 08:32 PM

I don’t know if it will sound hollow. But if it were me I’d just glue the wood around a piece of construction-grade lumber (making sure it was dry enough). Probably cost less than the expanding foam.

-- Jeremy, in the Acadian forests

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AlaskaGuy

2406 posts in 1771 days


#5 posted 01-18-2016 08:41 PM



I don t know if it will sound hollow. But if it were me I d just glue the wood around a piece of construction-grade lumber (making sure it was dry enough). Probably cost less than the expanding foam.

- jdh122

Beat ya by less that a minute.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

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716

502 posts in 379 days


#6 posted 01-18-2016 08:53 PM



I don t know if it will sound hollow. But if it were me I d just glue the wood around a piece of construction-grade lumber (making sure it was dry enough). Probably cost less than the expanding foam.

- jdh122


I would naively think that this approach requires too tight tolerance both in the thickness of the central piece and the width of the outer planks.

-- It's nice!

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716

502 posts in 379 days


#7 posted 01-18-2016 08:54 PM


I didn t know people went around knocking on table legs. I guess you learn some new everyday.
- AlaskaGuy

Sure they do. Just spend some time at a furniture store.

-- It's nice!

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

3933 posts in 1955 days


#8 posted 01-18-2016 08:55 PM

I still don’t think there will be a problem (with noise), but your idea about the plywood (or the construction lumber, etc.) will make it easier to keep them square when you clamp them up.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

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AlaskaGuy

2406 posts in 1771 days


#9 posted 01-18-2016 09:28 PM


I don t know if it will sound hollow. But if it were me I d just glue the wood around a piece of construction-grade lumber (making sure it was dry enough). Probably cost less than the expanding foam.

- jdh122

I would naively think that this approach requires too tight tolerance both in the thickness of the central piece and the width of the outer planks.

- 716


The hardest part of making that leg with a solid wood filler inside is setting up the lock miter bit.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

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716

502 posts in 379 days


#10 posted 01-18-2016 09:31 PM

Why would you need a lock miter bit if you are going to glue it around a solid wood filler?

-- It's nice!

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AlaskaGuy

2406 posts in 1771 days


#11 posted 01-18-2016 09:43 PM



Why would you need a lock miter bit if you are going to glue it around a solid wood filler?

- 716

Because a lock miter is a great joint to use for something like this.

Did you watch the video in the link I posted????

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View AandCstyle's profile

AandCstyle

2566 posts in 1719 days


#12 posted 01-18-2016 11:24 PM

716, make the legs from MDF (or other cheap material) and veneer all four sides with shop cut veneer. Then plane to the desired dimensions but leaving the planed veneer about 1/8 to 3/16” thick . The veneer edges will be virtually invisible.

-- Art

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716

502 posts in 379 days


#13 posted 01-19-2016 12:18 AM

Thanks AandCstyle,
But the sole reason I got into woodworking because I am sick of mdf covered with veneer.

-- It's nice!

View builtinbkyn's profile

builtinbkyn

651 posts in 403 days


#14 posted 01-19-2016 01:04 AM

Plane the boards and use a miter cut. I’ve made columns the same way using anything from maple to mahogany. They’ll be fine. Solid and strong if you’re using 4/4 stock.

These weren’t yet finished at the time the pic was taken, but they’re hollow and made from mahogany. It’s a job I did for a friend. It was a reconstruction of a 100 year old tudor that was neglected. I opened up that wall from the living room to the dining room and used the columns as a decorative element.

-- Bill, Yo!......in Brooklyn :)

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

2406 posts in 1771 days


#15 posted 01-19-2016 03:05 AM

Since it’s MLK day and I get to sit home without not much to to do today I thought I go out to the shop and do a show and tell for 716. This is the first time I’ve this style leg. But how hard can be with all the good instructions you can find on the internet.

That was picture of the milling of the 4/4 rough stock to 3/4

See next post for setting up the Lock Miter cutter and shaper fence.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

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