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Band saw, or router?

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Forum topic by huyz posted 01-18-2016 07:26 PM 636 views 1 time favorited 24 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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huyz

49 posts in 325 days


01-18-2016 07:26 PM

Topic tags/keywords: band saw router zero clearance insert inserts throat plates

Basically I’m trying to make zero clearance inserts for my table saw. I don’t like the idea of paying $30+ for them when I might want to make 4+ of them and could just put that money towards a tool that will have more use later.

Seems like the easy/popular way to cut the insert is to use a band saw. But it also seems possible with a router.

Which would you say has more utility than the other after having made these inserts? I plan on making tables & desks (not requiring curve cutting I think) and am leaning towards the router.. would love to know what you all think.

Thanks again!


24 replies so far

View conifur's profile

conifur

955 posts in 615 days


#1 posted 01-18-2016 07:31 PM

I dont really understand what you are asking? To buy a router or band saw, or to use them to make your inserts?

-- Knowledge and experience equals Wisdom, Michael Frankowski

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MrUnix

4225 posts in 1663 days


#2 posted 01-18-2016 07:31 PM

Either way will work. Not everyone has a band saw, and some don’t have a router… so you use what you got and what is easiest for you. Here is a good example of using the bandsaw by Matthias over at woodgears:

Making a zero clearance table saw insert

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

View ThomasChippendale's profile

ThomasChippendale

244 posts in 396 days


#3 posted 01-18-2016 07:32 PM

Rough cut your insert 1/8 oversize with the band saw, then screw it to you current insert and use the router with a trim bit to replicate exactly your current insert outline. Then place the new insert in the table saw and raise the blade through it. Use weight or other meand to keep the insert from raising with the blade.

-- PJ

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huyz

49 posts in 325 days


#4 posted 01-18-2016 07:36 PM



I dont really understand what you are asking? To buy a router or band saw, or to use them to make your inserts?

- conifur

Hey sorry I wasn’t clearer. My question was.. I’m going to buy only one of those tools. But which will be more useful in general, after I make this insert?

View builtinbkyn's profile

builtinbkyn

651 posts in 404 days


#5 posted 01-18-2016 07:36 PM

What PJ said. Cut it a little oversized then use double sided carpet tape to adhere it to you OEM insert. Use a flush cut bit with a bearing to dimension it to your original insert. Clamp a length of 2×4 or other scrap across the table and over the new insert and raise the blade thru your new blank.

-- Bill, Yo!......in Brooklyn :)

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HokieKen

1753 posts in 602 days


#6 posted 01-18-2016 07:37 PM

I do what PJ does ^ but with carpet tape instead of screws to hold the template to the blank. When you install the insert initially (at least in my saw) it won’t sit all the way down because the blade doesn’t lower enough. I put a 7-1/4” circular saw blade on to make the initial cut in the insert. Then, I can get the regular 10” blade in with the insert in place and finish cutting the slot out.

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

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builtinbkyn

651 posts in 404 days


#7 posted 01-18-2016 07:37 PM

Two very different machines with very different price points and skills required. A router would be the way to go. You could use a jig saw to rough cut your blank. Much cheaper option.

I dont really understand what you are asking? To buy a router or band saw, or to use them to make your inserts?

- conifur

Hey sorry I wasn t clearer. My question was.. I m going to buy only one of those tools. But which will be more useful in general, after I make this insert?

- huyz


-- Bill, Yo!......in Brooklyn :)

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huyz

49 posts in 325 days


#8 posted 01-18-2016 07:39 PM



Either way will work. Not everyone has a band saw, and some don t have a router… so you use what you got and what is easiest for you. Here is a good example of using the bandsaw by Matthias over at woodgears:

Making a zero clearance table saw insert

Cheers,
Brad

- MrUnix

Thanks, I’ve seen this and it looks good. The first time I just looked at pictures and the text and was thoroughly confused because he didn’t explain “why” for a lot of steps, but the video clears it up quite well :).

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HokieKen

1753 posts in 602 days


#9 posted 01-18-2016 07:40 PM


I dont really understand what you are asking? To buy a router or band saw, or to use them to make your inserts?

- conifur

Hey sorry I wasn t clearer. My question was.. I m going to buy only one of those tools. But which will be more useful in general, after I make this insert?

- huyz

Sorry, missed that. Can’t answer it either. Personally, I could get by without my bandsaw if I had to but no way I would want to give up my router. But I’m sure there are others that feel just the opposite. For tables and desks though, unless your resawing your own veneers, I’d definitely think the router would be more useful.

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

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huyz

49 posts in 325 days


#10 posted 01-18-2016 07:43 PM



Two very different machines with very different price points and skills required. A router would be the way to go. You could use a jig saw to rough cut your blank. Much cheaper option.

- builtinbkyn

Interesting, didn’t consider that. $30 jig saw should do the trick. Now to choose a router… Thank you Bill.

View huyz's profile

huyz

49 posts in 325 days


#11 posted 01-18-2016 07:45 PM



resawing your own veneers

- HokieKen

I appreciate the reply Kenny. Do you mean cutting my own veneers from blocks of wood? If so, yeah not quite at that level yet. But for trimming sheets of pre-made veneer I assume I can just cut it with a table saw/scissors, then trim edges with a router.

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HokieKen

1753 posts in 602 days


#12 posted 01-18-2016 07:58 PM


resawing your own veneers

- HokieKen

I appreciate the reply Kenny. Do you mean cutting my own veneers from blocks of wood? If so, yeah not quite at that level yet. But for trimming sheets of pre-made veneer I assume I can just cut it with a table saw/scissors, then trim edges with a router.

- huyz

Yep. Resawing is just slicing thin (or even thick) pieces out of thicker pieces. You can do it on the table saw but your height is more limited and there’s more waste.

For applying veneer, at least IMHO, a router is a necessity. You just rough cut it with your jig saw or table saw so it overhangs the edges then run the router around with a flush trim bit and you have a perfectly flush fit.

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

View MrUnix's profile (online now)

MrUnix

4225 posts in 1663 days


#13 posted 01-18-2016 08:01 PM

For making furniture and desks and such, a router would be almost required I would think… unless you plan on doing your round overs, decorative and other edge treatments by hand. And a router table would probably be a good first project as well.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

View 716's profile

716

502 posts in 380 days


#14 posted 01-18-2016 08:02 PM

Making a zero clearance insert should have zero impact on your decision what tool to buy. ZCI is a very minor project, that you can accomplish with whatever you have on hand already, even with a pocket knife and some sand paper.

-- It's nice!

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knotscott

7214 posts in 2839 days


#15 posted 01-18-2016 08:33 PM

I use both to make inserts, but a jigsaw or even a coping saw could handle the rough cutting. It’s personal and subjective, but I find the router to be about the most versatile tool in the shop. It’s much easier to find alternative methods for rough curve cutting than routing IMO.

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

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