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jig for cutoff saw

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Forum topic by 3285jeff posted 01-18-2016 01:47 AM 652 views 0 times favorited 8 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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3285jeff

152 posts in 1177 days


01-18-2016 01:47 AM

can anyone tell me if there is a jig you can purchase or make for your cutoff or miter saw for cutting small pieces,,something that will not let the wood twist,,and will not move and is safe,,thank you


8 replies so far

View gfadvm's profile

gfadvm

14940 posts in 2149 days


#1 posted 01-18-2016 01:54 AM

A tablesaw sled with holddowns is a MUCH safer option for cutting small parts accurately.

-- " I'll try to be nicer, if you'll try to be smarter" gfadvm

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woodbutcherbynight

2408 posts in 1868 days


#2 posted 01-18-2016 02:32 AM



A tablesaw sled with holddowns is a MUCH safer option for cutting small parts accurately.

- gfadvm

Absolutely, just built mine and used it today for just that.

-- Live to tell the stories, they sound better that way.

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waho6o9

7166 posts in 2036 days


#3 posted 01-18-2016 02:41 AM

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devann

2200 posts in 2152 days


#4 posted 01-18-2016 05:26 AM

Yes there is a method I use to cut small pieces with a miter saw that doesn’t place my hand in danger of cutting cutting myself.
It’s not a jig, it’s more of a technique.
First I begin by placing a sacrificial fence against the miter saw fence. I generally use MDO,MDF or plywood. It needs to be a straight and flat piece you’re using. Make a plunge cut in the sacrificial fence so you can align the piece of wood you wish to use to the proper length. You’re using this sacrificial fence so the piece you want to keep doesn’t get shot out of the back of the saw after the blade cuts it. It also prevents the piece you want to keep from twisting and ricocheting off the back of the saw and coming back at you. Or abruptly stopping the saw blade, damaging the saw blade.
Here’s a picture showing a setup I use to cut a small piece on the miter saw;

I the photo above I held the top, sacrificial/hold down piece with my hand just to the left of the clamp of the left side of the blade.
The piece I want to keep it this photo is the one on the bottom, just left of where the blade cut.

I’m comfortable with this.

If you’re not you can use your hold down clamp that comes with your miter saw.

Or use a longer piece of sacrificial/ hold down piece of wood placed on top of the desired piece of wood to be cut allowing you to place your hand further from the blade.

Just be aware that there can be no movement of any of the pieces shown during the cut. Don’t stop the blade until the cut is fully made.

And DO NOT RAISE the blade after completing the cut until it has STOPPED spinning.

Sometimes I have to cut even smaller pieces and this could mean even placing the sacrificial/hold down piece where it is also being cut. Again, it is important that there is no movement of any wood during the cut so take note that I use a piece of wood,( lower left piece shown) that is the same thickness has the piece of wood that I want to keep. (lower right, the piece that was cut by the saw)

I hope this helps you. Remember, don’t get your fingers anywhere close to that saw blade while cutting for any reason.

-- Darrell, making more sawdust than I know what to do with

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ChrisK

1809 posts in 2541 days


#5 posted 01-18-2016 01:29 PM

I do what devann does, if the pieces are big enough. I had a piece kick back on me once. The piece hit my thumb pretty hard. It was three days before I was back in the shop. If a table saw is an option, it is much safer.

-- Chris K

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WoodNSawdust

1417 posts in 636 days


#6 posted 01-18-2016 03:32 PM

A table saw with a sliding sled would be safer.

In addition to Darrell’s suggestion about a zero clearance fence on the back of a miter saw I also replaced the insert in the table of my miter saw with a zero clearance insert. This way both backwards (toward the fence) and downward directions have zero clearance.

I have never tried cutting very small parts with the miter saw but I have seen pictures of people using a pencile eraser to hold pieces smaller than one inch.

If it is a small piece I clamp it in my vice and use my Veritas (human powered) crosscut saw. I find this to be much safer.

-- "I love it when a plan comes together" John "Hannibal" Smith

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brtech

893 posts in 2382 days


#7 posted 01-18-2016 03:53 PM

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devann

2200 posts in 2152 days


#8 posted 01-18-2016 04:24 PM

A table saw sled can work for some small pieces, but Jeff ask for a miter saw solution.

I do what devann does, if the pieces are big enough. I had a piece kick back on me once. The piece hit my thumb pretty hard. It was three days before I was back in the shop. If a table saw is an option, it is much safer.

—Chris K

Remember, don’t get your fingers anywhere close to that saw blade while cutting for any reason.

And DO NOT RAISE the blade after completing the cut until it has STOPPED spinning

I’ve never seen the million dollar stick, Wish I’d thought of that $$! ;^)

But I see it does use the same principle. The rubber is a good idea. it will allow for use instead of where I specify using a scrap piece the same thickness has the keeper piece.

I agree a table saw sled can be used to safely cut a small piece. But sometimes I need to cut a piece smaller than the the sled will allow. example; A piece of shoe mold that needs to end when butting another trades finish product, no end grain allowed. Or the end of the window skirt, when no visible end grain is allowed. etc…. These pieces are too small to viably clamp and cut on a sled without the possibility of it ricocheting out into work area. My table saws don’t have a blade brake where miter saws commonly do.

-- Darrell, making more sawdust than I know what to do with

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