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Question re: powering in-wing router from 220V saw supply

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Forum topic by theo posted 1677 days ago 1727 views 0 times favorited 9 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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theo

6 posts in 2246 days


1677 days ago

Topic tags/keywords: router electrical

I’m looking for advice on home to most easily power the router I have in my unisaw extension wing.

The 220V outlet I have is wired with 10/3 to the outlet, 12/3 to the saw so, since there’s no neutral there (correct?) I don’t believe that I can pull 120V off before the saw (I have hot-hot-ground not hot-neutral-ground correct?). Does this sound correct? My electrical knowledge is a bit rusty when you get larger than BJT’s.

Since this isn’t going to work, how does everyone manage the extra cord? I know I can simply run the cord, but was hoping for something more elegant (I think I should have run 10/4, then a 12/4 extension cord, but that’s not financially feasible at the moment).

So, how do others manage this?

Thanks for the input!


9 replies so far

View lew's profile

lew

10006 posts in 2391 days


#1 posted 1677 days ago

10/3 and 12/3- is this “with ground”? In other words, do you have 4 wires? If so, then one of them is probably neutral. 10/3 with ground is usually Red, Black, White and bare. The white should be the neutral.

-- Lew- Time traveler. Purveyor of the Universe's finest custom rolling pins.

View sIKE's profile

sIKE

1271 posts in 2390 days


#2 posted 1677 days ago

Not that this helps now, but was how I handled it….

-- //FC - Round Rock, TX - "Experience is what you get just after you need it"

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TopamaxSurvivor

14727 posts in 2312 days


#3 posted 1677 days ago

If you have 2 hots and no neutral you are correct. I doubt if your cord cap and plug have 4 connections. If they have 3, you have 2 hots and a ground.

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

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theo

6 posts in 2246 days


#4 posted 1676 days ago

sIKE – I’d love to take advantage of your solution, but I’m thinking it may be a bit challenging currently (I’m not really in a position to rip up my shop/garage floor, unfortunately)

lew – There is definitely no uninsulated wire, the extension cord is terminated with L6-20 twist locks, and the cable that I made the cord from is what’s pictured below:
12/3 extension cord

So, from what TopamaxSurvivor says, I have no neutral. I’m definitely wishing I’d had the foresight to run 10/4 and 12/4…

So, given that I didn’t do a ton of thinking when I wired this, I guess I’m hoping that someone has some brilliant/elegant way of handling the extra cord for the router (preferably one that doesn’t involve significant construction – see sIKE’s enviable solution).

Thanks for the input so far!

View lew's profile

lew

10006 posts in 2391 days


#5 posted 1676 days ago

Sorry,
I thought you were talking about the “house side” wiring that came to the female receptacle. If the receptacle is wired with the Red, Black, White, bare (ground), you could maybe tap into the White, Black, Ground for 120v and wire in a separate receptacle for the router.
Lew

-- Lew- Time traveler. Purveyor of the Universe's finest custom rolling pins.

View MarkwithaK's profile

MarkwithaK

370 posts in 1814 days


#6 posted 1676 days ago

Many times when I’m working on a roof top unit and need a 120VAC connection I have used the female end of an extension cord with alligator clips to go from one leg on the 240 disconnect and the other to ground. I know it works in a pinch but not sure I would trust it long term

-- If at first you don't succeed then maybe skydiving isn't for you.

View Steven Naslund's profile

Steven Naslund

12 posts in 2137 days


#7 posted 1676 days ago

1. An L6-20 is two hots and a ground. No Neutral so you can’t run 120VAC. Using one hot and one ground as suggested above will provide 120V but the problem is that you don’t have an additional ground left. This violates code and is unsafe since the purpose of the ground is to provide an alternate return path. It can compromise your entire building grounding system to do this because power applied to the ground will appear system wide. Bad idea. This is a technicians trick used for temporary purcposes only. It appears that you have another outlet opening available in your box, you could pull a neutral in or just add another circuit.

You may also want to check if your router can handle 240V, alot of tools can now handle either voltage if the right cord set is put on it.

-- Steven Naslund, Chicago IL

View sIKE's profile

sIKE

1271 posts in 2390 days


#8 posted 1672 days ago

Oh and the 220V side is 10/4. I have the neutral capped off at this point as there is no need for it. If I had to do it again, I would of gone with much bigger PVC as a conduit to enable me to pull more down if I ever needed.

-- //FC - Round Rock, TX - "Experience is what you get just after you need it"

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

14727 posts in 2312 days


#9 posted 1672 days ago

It is good for 30 amps, that should be plenty, #12 would probably have been fine at 20 amps.

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

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