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Shellac...can or flakes

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Forum topic by TinWhiskers posted 01-14-2016 12:20 PM 802 views 0 times favorited 14 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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TinWhiskers

179 posts in 412 days


01-14-2016 12:20 PM

I have never used shellac. Would like to try on an indoor item over linseed oil. Would it be ok to get a can of dewaxed at the local paint store or should I get the flakes? Any flakes better than others?

Thx
Kim


14 replies so far

View OSU55's profile

OSU55

1056 posts in 1449 days


#1 posted 01-14-2016 12:39 PM

If the shellac will be the topcoat, the canned variety will be fine and it can be waxed or dewaxed. Zinsser seal coat is dewaxed, the other Zinsser cans labeled shellac have wax. I know Lowes has the waxed variety. I use flake shellac when using as a sealer/toner under a waterbased topcoat – some WB finishes don’t play well with Zinsser seal coat. Always use dewaxed shellac if it will be under any other topcoat. Transtinit dye can be added directly to shellac for toning.

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ellen35

2723 posts in 2892 days


#2 posted 01-14-2016 12:41 PM

I have used both. I love the flakes but they are very expensive and have to be mixed carefully.
The can is fine for most things. Just make sure it is DE-WAXED or you will not be able to get anything to stick.
I bought my flakes at Woodcraft but have priced them elsewhere and the cost is about the same.

-- "Don't let the perfect be the enemy of the good." Voltaire

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TinWhiskers

179 posts in 412 days


#3 posted 01-14-2016 01:17 PM

I will run to Lowes for Zinsser dewaxed. Don’t plan on a top coat. But it is always a possibility later on. A friend has what may be an antique square. Below is a pic of the holder for it. The square is about 2’ high by 1’ long. Made out of 1/4’’ stainless. Weighs about 20 lbs. Could be home made. The holder looks like an antique. Garage sale find. Hand sanded to get the coat of dirt off but retained the gouges and scratches. Linseed oil coated.

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WoodNSawdust

1417 posts in 636 days


#4 posted 01-14-2016 01:26 PM

I have found that shellac flakes will keep for years in a cool dry environment. When mixed (either by me or in a store bought can) will not last anywhere as long. So I favor the flakes. I mix them the day before I want to use. Every time I walk by I will give the glass container a shake to help the flakes to dissolve.

In any case I always get dewaxed.

Make sure that the undercoat (whatever the shellac is going over) is completely dry.

@OSU55: thanks I never thought about adding dye to the shellac. Learned something new today.

-- "I love it when a plan comes together" John "Hannibal" Smith

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AandCstyle

2561 posts in 1717 days


#5 posted 01-14-2016 02:03 PM

Tin, shellac is mildly acidic, so if the can is metal and you intend to store it for a long period of time (years), it would be better to store the liquid in a glass jar. There have been reports of the cans leaking or, rarely, the lids being blown off.

-- Art

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TinWhiskers

179 posts in 412 days


#6 posted 01-14-2016 02:09 PM

I did hear a guy on YouTube suggest to mix flakes in a non metallic comtainer. I will get a small can and transfer what I don’t use to a glass jar. Thx

View jdh122's profile

jdh122

879 posts in 2277 days


#7 posted 01-14-2016 02:42 PM

Like WoodNSawdust I prefer to mix my own.
People sometimes have issues with the pre-mixed being too old, at which point it won’t dry well. Zinsser’s says it should last a year in the container, but that is from time of mixing in the factory. Some people claim that it only really lasts six months. Regardless I suggest you only buy as much premixed as you can use over a few months.
Also, I don’t like the smell of the Zinsser’s – I think they dissolve in methyl hydrate, which is more toxic than denatured alcohol.

-- Jeremy, in the Acadian forests

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TinWhiskers

179 posts in 412 days


#8 posted 01-14-2016 02:51 PM

Back to the acidic issue…Would it be bad to use for a housing of a stainless steel square? I’d hate to see the square corrode. Home made or not, it is the best square I have seen.

After further thought…If it will eat a metal can I won’t use it.

Thx to all for tips.

View Bill White's profile

Bill White

4448 posts in 3420 days


#9 posted 01-14-2016 04:01 PM

You’ll be fine with the shellac. It won’t eat up the square or your insides. It is the liquid state that will sometimes corrode the can. Just had that happen last year.
Bill

-- bill@magraphics.us

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Mario

129 posts in 2856 days


#10 posted 01-14-2016 04:10 PM

Here you will find everything you need about shellac, I use dewaxed flakes all the time, IMHO there is nothing better for household, kitchen, or everyday accesories. http://www.shellac.net/

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TinWhiskers

179 posts in 412 days


#11 posted 01-14-2016 04:18 PM

The gig is back on. :o)

An extra caution…I won’t shellac the inside of the sheath.

More thx
Kim

View thirdrail's profile

thirdrail

54 posts in 2123 days


#12 posted 01-14-2016 05:08 PM

Shellac is my favorite finish. I mix it from flakes 4 to 8 oz at a time in a 2# cut so I don’t have to worry about how old the can is. Shellac.net – absolutely no connection – has good prices, fast shipping and a large variety of different colors available. If you do mix from flakes be sure to get the “green” version of denatured alcohol – it costs a dollar more a quart but isn’t cut with thinner or other unknowns.

-- Third rail

View Planeman40's profile

Planeman40

805 posts in 2221 days


#13 posted 01-15-2016 06:22 PM



Tin, shellac is mildly acidic, so if the can is metal and you intend to store it for a long period of time (years), it would be better to store the liquid in a glass jar. There have been reports of the cans leaking or, rarely, the lids being blown off.

- AandCstyle

Its interesting that you mentioned this. Just last week I opened a long time sitting can of Zinsser shellac-base primer and used it after a thorough stirring. Every time I picked the can up I noticed my fingers had primer on them. Looking further I noticed the table had a small puddle of primer where the can had sat. Checking the can carefully, I found a tiny rusted through hole in the side of the can. I moved all of the can contents to two glass jars. The rust must have weakened the side of the can and the pressure from holding it must have collapsed the can side opening the hole. I have never seen a rusted through paint can before unless it has been out in the weather for a very long time. Your comment answered my problem! Thanks!

-- Always remember: It is a mathematical certainty that half the people in this country are below average in intelligence!

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drake8595

3 posts in 497 days


#14 posted 07-23-2016 05:25 PM

You will find everything you need at http://wellermart.com/ WellerMart shellac is the best on the market and is less expensive than the prices I have seen elsewhere.

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